Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Discussion
  • Summary

The last test of the Crosman 100 was back in December, when I shot a remarkable 5 pellets into 0.145-inches at 10 meters. That engendered the question of whether it was just a lucky group or the rifle was really that accurate. I said at the end of that report that I would return and shoot 10 five-shot groups at 10 meters with the same pellet, so we could see whether that target was a fluke or representative. I waited until my right eye was corrected again, to give the test the best chance for success. So, today is the day! read more


Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic .177 PCP repeater: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Breaker rifle
Kral Puncher Breaker bullpup with synthetic stock.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • What happened?
  • The test
  • Sight in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Not a benchrest rifle
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.50mm head
  • Crosman Premier heavy
  • Evaluation
  • Next

What happened?

We will start with an explanation of why I had to abandon this test until today. When I tried to scope the Kral Puncher Breaker all the shots landed quite low. At 12 feet they were 5 inches too low and even when I backed up to 19 meters they only rose an inch. I was planning to show you some new scope mounts with this rifle, but they will have to wait for another rifle that’s not a bullpup. Scoping a bullpup can be a challenge if you’re not used to it.

I searched through all my mounts and scopes, looking for a good match. The Kral rifles have Weaver/Picatinney bases, so 11mm airgun mounts won’t work. read more


Hatsan Bullmaster PCP: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan Bullmaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test
  • H&N Baracuda
  • Trigger
  • Field Target Trophy
  • H&N Sniper Light
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Bug Buster performance
  • Summary

Happy Thanksgiving to my U.S. readers! I hope all of you have lots to be thankful for!

Today we complete the first accuracy test of the Hatsan Bullmaster. Let’s get right to it.

The test

I told you how I sighted in in Part 3. Today I set up at 25 yards and started shooting with the H&N Baracuda pellets that were used to sight in. The first round landed on paper, and 3 rounds later I was sighted in. I normally don’t like to hit the center of the bull because it destroys the aim point, but the reticle in the UTG 3-12X32 AO Bug Buster scope is so clear and sharp that I could guesstimate exactly where the center of the bull was. read more


Hatsan Bullmaster PCP: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan Bullmaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Comments
  • New Bug Buster
  • Power
  • H&N Baracuda 5.50mm head
  • H&N Sniper Light 5.50mm head
  • H&N Field Target Trophy with 5.53mm head
  • Shot count
  • Trigger
  • Sound
  • Summary
  • Next

Comments

I’ll start today’s report by listing some of the comments you readers made to Part 1. Several of you don’t care for the Hatsan BullMaster’s looks. That’s why I show a picture of the gun at the top of each report. You have to be satisfied with the appearance if you’re going to buy an airgun this expensive.

Next, several of you commented on the weight. At more than 10 pounds before the scope is mounted, this is not a lightweight airgun. Bullpups are small, but not necessarily light.

Then there is the size, itself. For a bullpup, the Bullmaster is on the large side. The overall length of just under 31 inches is very short compared to a conventional air rifle, but for a bullpup it’s on the long side. That length does give you a fully shrouded barrel that’s just under 20 inches, and you need the barrel length for power, but the point of a bullpup is its compact size. read more


Hatsan BullMaster PCP: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan BullMaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

This report covers:

  • Like the Sortie
  • Comparisons?
  • Companies change over time
  • Description
  • Fill
  • Pressure gauge
  • Magazines
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • So much more to tell
  • Next

Today I start my review of the Hatsan BullMaster precharged pneumatic air rifle. This is a repeating semiautomatic air rifle in bullpup configuration. It is available in both .177 and .22 calibers and the published energies, 21/31 foot-pounds, respectively, are right where they should be for a handy hunting air rifle. I am testing the .22, but since it was sent directly from Hatsan, I won’t publish the serial number. Your chances of getting this particular airgun are slim.

Like the Sortie

I tested the Sortie semiautomatic air pistol for you in a 5-part review back in September and October, and I did it intentionally. I had this BullMaster at that time, and since the actions of the two airguns are so similar, I wanted to start with the smaller one first. Testing the Sortie got me ready for the BullMaster. read more


The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Crosman Premiers
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 5.51mm heads
  • Top speed?
  • Hobbys
  • Firing cycle
  • Cocking
  • Trigger pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today we learn how powerful this smooth-shooting .22-caliber HW85 is. You may remember from Part 1 that I bought this rifle because of its super-smooth tune. So, let’s get right to it.

Crosman Premiers

The first pellet to be tested was the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier. These loaded easily and averaged 678 f.p.s. The range went from 672 to 693 — a spread of 21 f.p.s. At the average velocity this pellet produces 14.6 foot pounds. This was so close to the “magic” velocity of 671 f.p.s., where the weight of the pellet in grains equals the muzzle energy in foot pounds. I mention that because it’s just a handy thing to know. read more


Kral Puncher Pro B W PCP rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Pro
Kral Puncher Pro PCP. The test rifle’s walnut stock is not as blonde as this one.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • First test
  • Wind
  • Third test
  • RWS Superdome
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Adjust the scope
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.53mm heads
  • Evaluation
  • Next

You have waited patiently for this 50-yard accuracy report since the middle of May. I have had the rifle to the range several times, and today I’ll tell you what happened.

First test

The first time I went out, I couldn’t get the rifle to group with any pellet. No matter what I did with the power level, the pellets went all over the place. The groups were 5 to 7 inches. After seeing what the rifle could do at 25 yards with the same pellets, I knew something was wrong, and I thought I knew what it was. read more