Walther LP2 target pistol

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther LP2 left
Walther LP2 single stroke pneumatic target pistol.

History of airguns

This report covers:

History
LP3
Pumping an LP2
Lookalike
What the LP2 was
Next

Today we start looking at a Walther LP2 single-stroke pneumatic target pistol. I recently acquired one for a reasonable price, but when it arrived it did not pump. That is the bane of the LP2 — their valves were not robust and they tend not to work.

History

The LP2 was Walther’s first commercial success with a single stroke target pistol. It was produced from 1967 through 1972. Was there ever an LP1? There might have been, but if there was it didn’t last long enough to be officially recognized or to enter the market. read more


Sharpshooter pistol resurrection: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sharpshooter pistols
The Bulls Eye pistol (left) came first. Manufacture started in 1924 in Rawlins, Wyoming. The smaller Sharpshooter pistols at the right were made in Rawlins until sometime in World War II and then manufacture moved to La Jolla, California in 1946.

Part 1
Part 2

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • 1938 prices
  • Prototype Sharpshooter
  • Did you notice?
  • Stamp pad to make targets
  • Size
  • Oil the rails
  • Oh — my gosh!
  • Shot may be reused
  • But wait!
  • Accuracy
  • Velocity
  • Summary

Well, I just can’t put them down! I own four Sharpshooter pistols and one Bulls Eye and I’m finding them so much fun to shoot — now that I have a target that traps all the shot and shows all the hits. And, there is so much more to tell you!

I wrote about the Sharpshooter being the darling of the pistol shooting world. The French especially liked it so much that it was a featured product in World and Olympic champion Leon Johnson’s Paris catalog. Apparently he bought a lot of them because Dr. Bunten of Rawlins Wyoming went to the effort to apply for a French patent! In my research I discovered French markings on one pistol, and also found them on the box! All pistols made at a certain time probably had them, because that particular pistol was sold by a sporting goods store in Pennsylvania in 1942. read more


Beeman P17 valve modification: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is a guest blog from reader Streetmusician. As far as I can remember he has never signed into the blog under that name, but that is his handle. He tells us how he got more velocity out of his Beeman P17.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me at [email protected].

This report is an important part of the Beeman P17 series, so I am linking it to the other reports we have done on the pistol. The first two parts tell you how to reseal the gun, so if today’s report becomes a project you want to do, you now have the rest of it.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5 read more


Crosman Mark I and II reseal: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier


Crosmnan Mark schematic

Today’s report is another guest blog from reader Ian McKee who writes as 45 Bravo. He’s going to finish the report on resealing the Crosman Marks I and II CO2 pistols.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

History of airguns

Part 1 — resealing the end cap

Over to you, Ian.

Crosman Mark I and II reseal

Ian McKee 
Writing as 45 Bravo

This report covers:

  • Disassembly
  • Bolt removal
  • Hammer spring
  • Remove trigger guard
  • Remove the valve
  • Prep and assembly
  • The 4 o-rings in the pistol
  • Piercing cap o-rings
  • Assemble the pistol in the reverse order
  • Test the function

So, your Crosman MK1 is still leaking, even after you replaced the seal in the piercing cap as we covered in an earlier blog. 

There are only 4 o-rings in this pistol, only 3 have constant gas pressure on them when the gun is charged, and 2 of those are in or on the piercing cap assembly, and those we already covered.  read more