Date: 23/10/2018 17:41
0

Customers Q&A on Diana RWS 34 Striker Combo, TO6 Trigger

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  • Ethan from USA asked:

    is the scope good?

    • Richard from USA:

      I'm a newb to air guns and this is my first. That said, I think this scope is pretty decent. Once I got it sighted in I was able to hit my target accurately from 10 to 50 yds, which is as far as I went. Optically clear, plenty of adjustability, etc.

  • zsilt from Hungary asked:

    is dte rws 34 have a reddish wood stock like on the picture ore light brown?

    • Richard from USA:

      Most standard screens don't display colors correctly. The stock is more of a medium brown with no red tones that I can see.

  • Alberto from Colombia asked:

    HI, I would like to know if it's posible, what's the power of this Diana RWS 34 Striker in ft/lbs or Nm? Thanks in advance.

    • Randall from USA:

      Manufacturers typically arrive at their velocity figures by using the lightest pellets available and then rounding up to the nearest 100, at least that seems to be the case based on the actual velocities my airguns produce. With more standard weight pellets 7.9 for .177 and 14.3 in .22, you can expect up to 200 fps slower than the manufacturer's stated velocity. You can probably expect somewhere between 11 and 13 ft/lbs for the .177 version and 12 to 14 ft/lbs in .22. Formula for ft/lbs energy is VVM/450240, where V = velocity and M = weight of pellet in grains.Here are some velocities for you to remember. 671 fps is the velocity where energy equals the weight of the pellet, eg: an 8 grain pellet traveling at 671 fps will produce 8 ft/lbs of energy. At 822 fps, the energy is 1 1/2 times the pellet weight, so an 8 grain pellet at 822 fps = 12 ft/lbs. At 949 fps the energy is twice the pellet weight. The gun will produce roughly the same amount of energy regardless of the pellet weight you choose, in most cases. My HW95 in .22 caliber for example, produces 14.7 to 15.7 ft/lbs energy whether I'm using a 12 grain pellet or an 18 grain pellet, or anywhere in between.

    • Randall from USA:

      Manufacturers typically use the lightest pellets to arrive at their figures and inflate their numbers. RWS claims 800fps in .22 and 1000fps in .177. Realistically you can probably expect more like 650 to 700 fps in .22 and 850 to 900 fps in .177 using more standard weight pellets in each caliber. That equates to between 12 and 15 ft/lbs energy. The .22 caliber version will probably produce 1 or 2 ft/lbs more than .177, depending on the particular gun and pellet weight chosen. The formula for figuring ft/lbs energy is velocity squared multiplied by pellet weight in grains, then divided by 450240.

    • Paul from USA:

      Foot lb.s is determined by velocity and the weight of the pellet. You can easily change the foot lb.s by changing the weight of the pellet your using. Also it depends if you're talking about a .22 or a .177.

  • VICENTE from Colombia asked:

    Hello. Please, let me ask with what pellets weight give this rifle the anounced 800 FPS. Thanks.

    • Paul from USA:

      Are you asking in regards to a .22 or a.177? A.177 with a light pellet it probably could easily be done.

    • Chevota from USA:

      The only way this gun will hit 800 is with the lightest lead pellet available, which I believe is RWS Hobby at 11.9gr. With normal 14.3gr expect closer to 700. Some people post velocity in the reviews so maybe check there. The velocity also varies from gun to gun but others numbers can give you an idea.

    • Jerry from USA:

      The tests are done from the manufacturer, I would imagine something between 13 and 15 grain

  • Ernest from USA asked:

    need all info about the scope

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