Airguns they should make

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Weihrauch
  • Crosman
  • Diana
  • Up for grabs — Umarex?

Today, I’m going to talk about some airguns I wish were made. I’m not talking about the fine guns of 60 years ago that were made of blued steel and nice walnut. I understand that level of hand work costs so much that it is practically impossible to build today — outside of a handmade proposition. What I’m taking about are airguns that could be made with very little risk or cash outlay by the manufacturers. The basis for some of these guns is in the inventory right now and require only minor changes to make entire new models that I believe shooters will embrace. This is how the Air Venturi Bronco was designed, and also how the $100 PCP was created.

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Back to the basics — Scope tips: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Droop — or downward slant
  • My point is…
  • I must care about this
  • Scope placement

This series examines the task of mounting a scope on an air rifle and sighting it in. Part 2 addressed mounting a scope, but it didn’t cover all of the problem areas, so today I’ll continue the discussion.

Droop — or downward slant

I will say that 80 percent of all the firearms and airguns I have examined have some degree of downward slant of their bores in relation to the line of sight of a scope that’s mounted on them. And I will go on to say that half of those are so serious as to cause problems. The airgun term for this is droop. The firearm world has no term for it and is generally ignorant of the problem. The single firearm that doesn’t seem to have this problem to the extent mentioned here is the AR platform. Perhaps the designers recognized the problem and solved it through engineering. I don’t know, but ARs seem to be relatively droop-free.

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Mosin Nagant 1891 CO2 BB Rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Mosin Nagant CO2 BB gun
The Gletcher Mosin Nagant 1891 CO2 BB Rifle (gun) is extremely realistic.

This report covers:

  • Piercing the first cartridge
  • Daisy BBs
  • Hornady BBs
  • Umarex BBs
  • Shot count
  • Trigger-pull
  • Some observations about the test gun

The first Mosin Nagant 1891 CO2 BB Rifle I tested didn’t work out very well. I noted a gas leak when the first CO2 cartridge was pierced, and that started a list of problems that plagued the gun right up to the velocity test, where it failed altogether. So, I ordered a second gun from Pyramyd Air and that’s the one I’m testing today.

All the general remarks made in Part 1 still hold for this second gun. It’s just as heavy and rugged-looking as any Mosin Nagant firearm. But when I pierced the first CO2 cartridge I noticed a difference.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

RWS Diana 45 air rifle
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Uh-oh!
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Time to stop and think
  • H&N Baracuda Match pellets with 4.53mm head
  • Where we are

Today, we’ll look at the performance of the Diana 45 that we tuned recently. Although a new mainspring was installed, it has the same power as the spring that was in the rifle, so no vast power increase was anticipated. If there’s any increase at all, it will probably come from the new breech seal I installed. The old one was flat and hard, so the breech is probably sealing air better now.

The point of this tune was to eliminate as much vibration as we could. The rifle’s owner, Johnny Hill, did not like the buzz that came with every shot, and I told him that most or even all of that could be eliminated by tightening the tolerances inside the powerplant. At my request, he made a larger spring guide, and he buttoned the piston to take out as much vibration as possible.

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Talon SS versus Ruger 10/22: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Ruger 10/22 rimfire rifle
  • AirForce Airguns Talon SS
  • The test
  • The results
  • Bottom line
  • The surprise
  • A goldmine of data!
  • The results

This report tested the relative accuracy of an AirForce Talon SS against a Ruger 10/22 rimfire. I went to the range several times to shoot all the 10-shot groups I needed, so it took some time to get to today’s report.

I had a preconception of how accurate a Ruger 10/22 was, and I knew very well how accurate an AirForce Talon SS was. I figured the Ruger didn’t stand a chance against the air rifle. If I’d used any of the standard Ruger 10/22s I have shot up to this point, things would have worked out as I expected.

Ruger 10/22 rimfire rifle

But the rifle I used in this test was chosen because it surprised me with its accuracy. I got it in trade at a gun show and was surprised when I saw how well it shot. In fact, it was the accuracy of this rifle that inspired this test to begin with. I have owned a number of 10/22s and shot many others; but until this rifle came along, I’d never seen a standard Ruger right out of the box that shot this well.

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Crosman’s 2400KT carbine: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Today’s report is the continuation of a guest blog from reader HiveSeeker about his Crosman 2400KT.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, HiveSeeker.

Crosman 2400 KT
The 2400KT CO2 carbine is available exclusively from the Crosman Custom Shop.

This report covers:

  • Velocity .22 — Wow!
  • Crosman SSP pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • The Crosman clan
  • Benjamin Discovery domed magnum pellets
  • Benjamin Discovery hollow point pellets
  • Beeman Kodiak pellets
  • JSB Match Exact Jumbo Monster pellets
  • Noise
  • The most powerful non-PCP air pistols
  • More muzzle energy!
  • B.B.’s Crosman 2240 conversion to air

Velocity .22 — Wow!

Our shots-per-fill and .177 velocity discussion have already tipped my hand — the Crosman 2400KT is a powerhouse CO2 pistol in .22! That’s one of the most important things I have to report in this blog.

I was hoping for velocities over 500 fps in my HiveSeeker .22, and that was what I got with almost everything I tested. The 2400KT posted an average velocity of 573 fps with the middleweight 14.3-grain Benjamin domed magnum. Velocities ranged from 673 fps with the 9.5-grain alloy Crosman SSP, down to 451 fps with the aptly-named 25.39-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Monster. I had definitely attained what I wanted in the velocity department! Go ahead and take a look:

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The Benjamin Bulldog big bore air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • The bullets
  • At the range
  • Velocity with Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets
  • Tin Starr 103-grain semi-wadcutter
  • A funny thing happened
  • 158-grain .358 semi-wadcutter
  • How loud is it?
  • Trigger-pull
  • New bullets to try
  • Thanks to Pyramyd Air
  • Evaluation so far
  • One last thing

Time to let the Bulldog bark! Today, I’m testing the Benjamin Bulldog velocity with a couple different rounds. And some interesting things happen!

As I said in Part 1, the Benjamin Bulldog is not a rifle you can test indoors. Even with its shroud, it has to be loud, so I waited to test it at my outdoor rifle range. Also, I would never test an airgun this powerful in my house.

The bullets

The Bulldog is listed as a .357-caliber rifle, so I took several different bullets for this test. Crosman sent me several boxes of their 145-grain Benjamin Nosler Ballistic Tip bullets, which are lead bullets with a red polymer tip that forms a pointed nose. I knew they were great big bore bullets from when I tested the Rogue.

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