Walther Terrus air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus Rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • Quick notes
  • The Terrus
  • The rifle
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Stock
  • A threaded muzzle!
  • Overall impression

Quick notes

Thank you for being patient in April. It was a busy month for me!

Now that the last event is over, I’ll get back to accuracy tests for both the Benjamin Bulldog and the Hatsan BT-65. I now have additional bullets for the Bulldog and additional pellets for the Hatsan, so this should be good. I hope to get to the range later this week with both of those rifles.

I finally got my HW 35 at the Malvern airgun show, and it came with a big surprise. The rifle has been tuned! From the feel of it, the tune was a good one; but, of course, I need to test it thoroughly to know for sure. I had plans for tuning the rifle after my basic test, but now those plans will hinge on how well the rifle is already shooting. I may leave it as it is. I hope it’s also accurate.

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2015 Malvern airgun show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Layers of intrigue
  • Seth’s bullets
  • Rocket Shot
  • AirForce Airguns Texan big bore air rifle
  • Dennis Quackenbush
  • Mike Melick
  • Pellet Head Gauge
  • RAI
  • WOW!

Malvern is a show that has evolved over the years. Originally, it was the Little Rock, Arkansas, show and was held in Benton, Arkansas, inside an empty mall building for many years. Then, it moved a few miles to the west to the county fairgrounds for several more years before the promoter decided to give up the show.

Layers of intrigue

Seth Rowland, who makes bullets for big bore hunters, took over promoting the show and moved it to the old country fairgrounds in Malvern, Arkansas, about 20 miles further west on Interstate 30. Of all the airgun shows being held, Malvern is the smallest and the quietest, but it’s also one that has many surprises every year. This year, I’ll say that I saw layers of intrigue to the show. That’s what I’ll discuss today.

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Ballistic coefficient: What is it? Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Review
  • Today’s discussion
  • Round balls
  • Conical bullets
  • Smokeless powder
  • A big point
  • Shape
  • Round balls — again
  • The bottom line

I’ve taken 11 months to return to this subject of ballistic coefficients (BC). That was in spite of some tremendous interest in Part 1 of this report last May.

I’m purposely avoiding all discussion of mathematics, which is difficult, since ballistics is a discipline that heavily employs mathematics. But I’m not qualified to write about the math; and, more importantly, I know that 99 percent of my readers would be turned off if I were to write the report that way.

Review

Last time we learned that the BC of a pellet:

• Is an extremely small decimal fraction compared to the BC of a conical bullet.
• Varies with the velocity of the pellet.
• Varies with the shape (form) of the pellet.

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Gletcher NGT Nagant CO2 BB revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Nagant CO2 BB revolver
Gletcher Nagant CO2 BB revolver

This report covers:

  • No safety
  • Some problems with the CO2
  • Second cartridge
  • Velocity
  • Daisy BBs
  • Crosman Copperhead BBs
  • Shot count
  • Sound
  • Trigger-pull
  • Evaluation so far

Today, we’ll look at the Gletcher Nagant CO2 BB revolver. We’ll check the velocity, the trigger-pull, and one or two other things that might come up with this interesting BB gun.

Some of you said you own Nagant revolvers and were glad to see this BB revolver. This is one time when I feel ill at ease with you readers, because I don’t have any experience with the firearm. Of course, the gun I’m testing is a BB gun that differs from the firearm, so I can learn as we go.

No safety

Someone asked if this revolver has a safety, and that started a discussion on revolver safeties. The Nagant revolver does not have a safety on either the firearm or the CO2 BB gun.

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H&N Hornet pellet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

H&N Hornet

H&N Hornet pellets

This report covers:

  • The first test
  • Today’s test
  • On to the Hornet
  • What’s next?
  • 2015 Pyramyd Air Cup

Readers suggested I test the Hornet in my TX200 Mark III. I could do that, and it would be easier than the rifle I chose to use for today’s test. But is it realistic? Most readers don’t own a TX and won’t buy one. I chose to test the pellet at high power in my Diana RWS 34P — a rifle of incredible accuracy when the correct hold is used. This is an air rifle that many more shooters around the world are likely to own.

The first test

In part 1, we saw the Hornet pellet tested in my Beeman R8 rifle. That rifle shoots the Air Arms Falcon pellet best, so that was the test standard. You can read part 1 to see everything that happened, but the bottom line is that the Hornet is only average. It was okay, but the Falcon outshot it.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Cocking effort
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • H&N Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Why the slow shots?
  • Trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Cocking effort

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle. I said in part 1 that cocking this rifle is a chore for 2 hands, but I’ve learned something about the gun in this test. The gas spring isn’t the only thing I’m fighting to cock the rifle. The barrel pivot joint is also a bit too tight. The cocking effort is about 35 lbs, which isn’t that bad, but the pivot joint boosts that up to 42 lbs. It made the rifle difficult to measure, but I soon learned to rapidly pull down the barrel and bypass the pivot joint tension. Then, it is a one-handed operation.

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Interesting gun designs: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Something special from the back room!
  • Easy to cock
  • Smooth shooting
  • Testus interruptus
  • No more Legacy
  • Something’s coming — maybe
  • The rifle
  • Cocking effort 16 lbs.
  • A modern Diana 27?

Today’s report is the reason I wrote the whole report about interesting designs. Today, I’m going to address what I’ve wanted to show you for the past 5 years. This is an interesting story, so fill your cup, sit back and enjoy.

It began in 2009, when Paul Capello and I started the television show American Airgunner. We needed content for the show, and the Crosman Corporation in East Bloomfield, New York, invited us to come in and film their operation. I had toured parts of their plant before, and I knew there was a lot to see.

Something special from the back room!

During the tour, their head engineer, Ed Schultz, asked if we would like to see something special. Naturally, we were excited! He took us out a back door next to the bulk CO2 tank that fills all the cartridges they make. Then, he told us about a secret project of his.

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