Back to the basics — Scope tips: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• What we’re doing
• Many things going on
• First things when mounting scopes
• Clean the gun and mount
• The mount
• Installing the mount
• Install the scope
• Install top caps and screws
• Align the vertical reticle
• Time to tighten the caps

What we’re doing
Today, I’m going to mount a scope for you and show some of my mounting techniques. These have been available for 10 years in the Pyramyd Air articles pages as a 3-part series — Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.

Many things going on
I’ll also add some things to this report. For starters, I’m making this a multiple blog by also reporting on the new Diana Bullseye ZR recoil reducing scope mount. And, I’m installing this mount on the BSA Supersport SE that I promised would have a Part 4. Another benefit! Finally, I selected the Aeon 8-32X50 AO scope with trajectory reticle for the rifle. The special trajectory reticle can be useful when shooting rifles at different distances. Aeon also has the same scope equipped with other reticles.

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Qiang Yuan pellet comparison test: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Qiang Yuan pellets
Qiang Yuan is a pellet name that’s unknown in the U.S. Olympic pellets in the red box (200), match-grade pellets in the yellow box (200) and training pellets in the round tin (500). These 3 will each be pitted against equivalent pellets that are well known.

This report covers:

• Qiang Yuan match-grade pellet
• FWB 300S air rifle
• Crosman Challenger PCP rifle
• Summary
• Up next

Let’s look at the second Qiang Yuan pellet — the Qiang Yuan Match Pellet. The test structure is the same as before.

Qiang Yuan match-grade pellet
Let’s talk about this pellet for a moment. As of the publication date of this blog report, this pellet sells for $12.99 for a box of 200. Inside the box there are 4 foam trays with 50 pellets each. They’re arranged in rows of 10, which is the universal way airgun 10-meter competitors want them, because all matches are shot in multiples of 10 targets — 40 targets or 60 targets, and so on. A competitor uses his pellet box to know exactly where he is in the match. This prevents him from shooting at the wrong bull, since only one shot is fired per bull in a match. If a second pellet hits the same bull, the lower score is taken.

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Mosin Nagant 1891 CO2 BB Rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Mosin Nagant CO2 BB gun

The Gletcher Mosin Nagant 1891 CO2 BB rifle (gun) is extremely realistic.

This report covers:

• Piercing the first cartridge
• Daisy BBs
• Hornady Black Diamond BBs
• Umarex Precision Steel BBs
• It’s over — for now

There was a lot of discussion about the Mosin Nagant 1891 CO2 BB Rifle last time. Some of you were angry that such an airgun even existed, while others complained about the firearm from which it was copied! That’s like panning the World War II Liberator pistol because it isn’t a sporting arm!

Other folks were intrigued by this gun, but I still heard a lot of warnings. One was that Gletcher CO2 guns all leak — or at least that was one person’s experience. As it turns out, that ties into today’s report, so let’s start there.

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Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE air rifle

This report covers:

• Today’s rifle is different
• BT65 rifle specs
• Let’s talk price
• Quattro trigger
• Automatic safety
• Circular clip
• My plans for this test

Okay, back to work. Let’s start a look at Hatsan’s powerful precharged pneumatic air rifle (PCP) — the BT65 QE. I know this rifle has been out there awhile, but I just reviewed the AT44-10 Long QE last July, so I’m slow all around. That rifle was so accurate at 50 yards that I took it out to 100 yards — something I seldom do.

Today’s rifle is different
But today’s rifle is different. It looks very similar to the AT44-10, and it’s a 9-shot repeater (in .25 caliber, 10 in .177 and .22). But the BT65 is more powerful. It’s also very long, though that adjective is missing from the title. In short — this is the big one. I ordered it in .25 caliber because I have something special I want to do with it. But more on that later.

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Ten years and counting

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Ten years have passed
• Rocky start
• I’ve got a secret
• Firearms enter the mix
• I am not an expert
• Meadowlark Lemon
• Friends past and present
• And then I got sick

Ten years have passed
Today is special because it marks the end of the first 10 years of this blog! We began on March 2, 2005, with a report titled Hunt with the Sheridan Blue Streak air rifle. A lot has happened since then.

Rocky start
In the beginning I was “advised” by some internet “experts” that web logs (blogs) are supposed to be very short pieces. Make them too long and they bore the readers. I tried to write just 500 words per report, but it didn’t work out. I couldn’t get enough thoughts into only 500 words, so I forgot what the experts said and just wrote until I was done. Before long, I realized that to do a decent test I would need to serialize my reports, and that is where parts 1, 2 and 3 came from.

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CZ P-09 Duty BB and Pellet pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

CZ P-09 Duty
CZ P-09 BB and pellet pistol closely copies the firearm.

Part 1

This report covers:

• Test design
• Daisy BBs
• ASG Blaster BBs
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• RWS Hobby pellets
• Shot count
• Trigger pull

Today, we’ll look at the power and velocity of the CZ P-09 Duty from ASG. If you remember from Part 1, this blowback pistol can shoot either steel BBs or lead pellets from its 16-shot magazine. Each end of the mag has an 8-shot circular clip that rotates as the gun is fired.

The pistol is both single-action (hammer is already cocked before the trigger is pulled) and double-action (hammer is cocked by pulling the trigger); but in this case, you’re going to be firing it single-action most of the time. That’s because each time the slide blows back, it cocks the hammer for the next shot. I did shoot it double-action (hammer down when the trigger is pulled) twice, but saw no real difference in velocity. And, since you aren’t going to shoot it that way most of the time, I decided to test the gun single-action, only.

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Things you can do to make your new airgun better: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

• Shoot it!
• Test it!
• Clean it — maybe
• Oil it — maybe
• Keep your hands off!

Today, I’m going to look at precharged pneumatics (PCP). Maybe you thought these came ready to go right from the factory, and in many ways they do; but even with this powerplant, there are always things you can do to make the guns shoot better.

Shoot it!
The first thing is something most people are going to do anyway — I just want to make you aware of how it affects your gun. Shoot it! Don’t take it apart to see how it works and if you can “correct” all the flaws the “stupid” factory left in the gun when they made it. Don’t send it off to be tuned. Just shoot the thing, and it will get better.

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