Starting your own airgun business

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Announcement: I’m in Ohio participating in the first annual Pyramyd Air Cup. If you’re in the area, please stop by to chew the fat with airgun hunter and writer Jim Chapman, Airgun Reporter Paul Capello and me. Even if you don’t want to shoot in the silhouette, field target or other competition matches, there are plenty of guns to shoot and try at the practice range. I’ll be returning home on Monday. In my absence, my wife, Edith, will be keeping a closer eye on the blog. I’d appreciate it if our regular blog readers would step in and answer blog questions while I’m gone.

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Legends M712 full-auto CO2 BB pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Legends M712 Full Auto CO2 BB pistol
Legends M712 full-auto BB pistol.

This report covers:

• Velocity
• Shot count
• Summary of this test
• Full-auto test
• Pay attention to the magazine follower
• Cock the gun with the bolt
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far
• I’m at the Pyramyd Air Cup

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Legends M712 full-auto CO2 BB pistol. This pistol is powered by CO2, which means the gun cools down as you fire. As CO2 cools the gun, the pressure drops, so the velocity drops as well. Nothing new there, except this is a full-auto gun that has no limits to the number of BBs that can be fired in a single burst. You can empty the magazine of all 18 if you desire, so one of the things I’ll be checking is what full-auto firing does to velocity.

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Crosman’s 2400KT Carbine: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Today’s report is the start of another guest blog from blog reader HiveSeeker. He’s going to tell us about his Crosman 2400KT — an airgun many will not have heard of.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

Over to you, HiveSeeker.

Crosman 2400 KT
The 2400KT CO2 Carbine is available exclusively from the Crosman Custom Shop in several configurations.

This report covers:

• In the beginning
• Choices
• Crosman Custom Shop
• Special delivery
• “Sassy Sandy” .177 target carbine
• “HiveSeeker” .22 light-duty small-game carbine
Pyramyd Air Cup

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Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle
FWB Sport air rifle

This report covers:

• Selecting scope mounts
• Which scope?
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• Shooting behavior
• JSB Exact 8.4-grain pellets
• Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Crosman Premier heavy pellets
• Conclusion to this point

Today, I’ll shoot the scoped Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle at 25 yards. We should see the rifle’s real potential.

Selecting scope mounts
You know the FWB has those half-round scope stop holes (see in Part 1) that require special scope mounts. I didn’t have any that fit. I thought I did, but mine were made for the UK-made Webley Patriot, and the two pins on the bottom are out of line with the FWB grooves. Fortunately, I did have several BKL mounts that hold with clamping pressure, alone. I selected the BKL 30mm high rings. Although they have only 1 strap with just 2 cap screws each, they held perfectly throughout the test.

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Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Webley Rebel air rifle
Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic air rifle.

This report covers:

• Test design
• Velocity with Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Average with Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Velocity with RWS Hobby pellets
• Average with RWS Hobby pellets
• Velocity with H&N Baracuda Match pellets
• Average with H&N Baracuda Match pellets
• How fast?
• Pump effort
• Trigger-pull
• Made by Sharp
• Evaluation thus far

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Webley Rebel multi-pump pneumatic. As you read in Part 1, this rifle is advertised to get 963 f.p.s. in .177 on a full charge of 8 pumps. We’ll see if that’s the case.

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The American Boy Scout Remington rifle

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

American Boy Scout rifle
American Boy Scout rifle.

This report covers:

• History of the American Boy Scouts
• Remington rifle chosen
• Why a bayonet?
• Features of the rifle
• How it shoots
• How was the rifle used?
• Pyramyd Air Cup

And now for something entirely different, yet surprisingly similar.

History of the American Boy Scouts
In 1907, Lieutenant General Baden-Powell held the Brownsea Island scout camp, which is considered the start of the Boy Scouts. In February 8, 1910, American publisher W.D. Boyce founded the Boy Scouts of America, inspired by and based on the British Boy Scouts and with the blessing of Baden-Powell. The organization has grown to be a large and successful one that has touched the lives of many men in the United States.

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Airgunner Christmas gifts for 2014: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

• Nice air rifles
• Nice air pistols
• There will be more

A lot has changed since I did this last year, and I’m going to do it differently this time. Not so much structure, but I’ll list gifts in certain price ranges. This year I’m going to tell you what I would want, if I were you. If something is left off this year’s list, be sure to speak up!

Nice air rifles
Let’s start low and work our way up. Multi-pumps are among the least expensive rifles, and I would pick the Crosman M4-177. When I tested it I liked it so much that I bought the test rifle. It’s accurate, has good sights and feels as good as a black rifle can.

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