Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Cocking effort
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • H&N Baracuda Match pellets, 4.50mm head
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Why the slow shots?
  • Trigger
  • Evaluation so far

Cocking effort

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle. I said in part 1 that cocking this rifle is a chore for 2 hands, but I’ve learned something about the gun in this test. The gas spring isn’t the only thing I’m fighting to cock the rifle. The barrel pivot joint is also a bit too tight. The cocking effort is about 35 lbs, which isn’t that bad, but the pivot joint boosts that up to 42 lbs. It made the rifle difficult to measure, but I soon learned to rapidly pull down the barrel and bypass the pivot joint tension. Then, it is a one-handed operation.

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Interesting gun designs: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Something special from the back room!
  • Easy to cock
  • Smooth shooting
  • Testus interruptus
  • No more Legacy
  • Something’s coming — maybe
  • The rifle
  • Cocking effort 16 lbs.
  • A modern Diana 27?

Today’s report is the reason I wrote the whole report about interesting designs. Today, I’m going to address what I’ve wanted to show you for the past 5 years. This is an interesting story, so fill your cup, sit back and enjoy.

It began in 2009, when Paul Capello and I started the television show American Airgunner. We needed content for the show, and the Crosman Corporation in East Bloomfield, New York, invited us to come in and film their operation. I had toured parts of their plant before, and I knew there was a lot to see.

Something special from the back room!

During the tour, their head engineer, Ed Schultz, asked if we would like to see something special. Naturally, we were excited! He took us out a back door next to the bulk CO2 tank that fills all the cartridges they make. Then, he told us about a secret project of his.

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Best of B.B.: Spring gun performance as caliber changes

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Spring gun performance as caliber changes
  • .177 caliber
  • .20 caliber
  • .22 caliber
  • .25 caliber
  • Results

This is a report I wrote in 2008. I selected it for today’s blog because we have so many new readers that I felt it would be good to go over the basics, again. We’re going to discuss the basics of spring-gun power. This report demonstrates how the muzzle energy of a spring gun increases as the caliber increases.

Spring gun performance as caliber changes

This is an indoor test I’ve wanted to do for more than 10 years. Because I own a Whiscombe JW 75 with all four smallbore barrels, I can test how each caliber performs with the rifle set at one specific power level so I can control as many variables as possible.

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Gletcher NGT Nagant CO2 BB revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Nagant CO2 BB revolver
Gletcher Nagant CO2 BB revolver

This report covers:

  • Unique design
  • Unique firearm cartridge
  • Loading gate
  • Power
  • It disassembles!
  • Cult status

Today, we’ll start our look at Gletcher’s Nagant CO2 BB revolver. This lookalike BB gun comes in both black and silver finishes, with a $30 premium for the silver. It’s a 7-shot solid-frame revolver whose prototype firearm (the Russian 1895 Nagant) was designed in the 19th century — so there are some differences from today’s standard handguns.

Unique design

For starters, the Nagant revolver pushes the cylinder forward to mate with the rear of the barrel for less gas loss at firing. The BB gun replica only simulates that with a spring-loaded barrel that moves in and out as the cylinder turns — but don’t fret. That function on the firearm made the double-action trigger-pull very heavy! The BB-gun trigger is light.

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2015 Findlay airgun show: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • You won’t believe it!
  • At my table
  • Old stuff
  • And toys
  • And on and on…

You won’t believe it!

I was walking the aisles, looking at all the guns and trying to see everything. On the floor at one table there was a standing rack with what appeared to be a Bugelspanner. I showed you a Bugelspanner several years ago. I’ve seen hundreds of Bugelspanners over the past couple decades I’ve been going to airgun shows, but this one looked a little different. So, I inquired about it — and got the best story of the whole show.

For starters, it wasn’t a Bugelspanner (triggerguard-cocker) at all. It was a Heblespanner (side-winding crank-cocker), similar in function to my David Lurch gallery dart gun, though quite unlike it at the same time. Let’s take a look.

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Diana 340 N-TEC Classic air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana N-TEC 340 Classic
Diana 340 N-TEC Classic

This report covers:

  • What is the 340 N-TEC Classic?
  • Gas-spring advantages and disadvantages
  • The rifle
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Shooting impressions
  • Overall impression

Let’s begin our look at Diana’s gas-spring guns. Specifically, we’re testing the Diana 340 N-TEC Classic in .177 caliber. The serial number of the rifle I’m testing is 01583666.

I’m very cautious when testing spring rifles that have gas springs, because dozens of past tests have made me skeptical over the years. The claims for smooth shooting almost never pan out. The claims for accuracy are often inflated. The cocking effort is often played down when I find it to be a major influence in how easy it is to operate the gun.

I’ve seen fewer than 10 air rifles with gas springs that I could recommend to others. So, as I look at this rifle, I’ll be looking from the vantage point of a lot of past experience.

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2015 Findlay airgun show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The show begins
  • Grab ‘em when you see ‘em
  • Something for everyone
  • Hot show
  • New book coming
  • Look, but don’t touch!
  • In the aisles
  • Pellets!
  • More to come

Intro sign

The show begins

It was good to see the old gang, again, at this year’s Findlay airgun show. Findlay is a show that combines the old with the new, and you never know what will walk in the door. I sat at Dennis Quackenbush’s table, so I’ll begin there.

Dennis usually doesn’t have big bore guns to sell at the show, because he’s busy filling orders all the time. But at this show, he had 3 of them — one .458 and two .308s. These were guns with extra-long barrels that nobody had ordered, so Dennis could sell them without pushing anyone back on his list. All 3 sold in the first 42 minutes after the doors opened at 9 a.m., and one was sold while a second customer was on his phone trying to decide whether or not to buy it. Before his call was finished, the gun sold. Folks, if you see something you like at an airgun show, buy it. And if you think you want to buy it, never set it down until the deal is made.

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