Beeman Double Barrel air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Beeman Double Barrel air rifle
Beeman Double Barrel air rifle.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • The first pellet — Crosman Premier lites
  • Oh, my!
  • The best — Hobbys
  • Let’s consider this
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Discussion
  • I was wrong — sort of
  • Next

Hold on, kids, because today’s report will be the most exciting one you have read in a long time! Today I start looking at the accuracy of the Beeman Double Barrel air rifle. If you are sharp you caught the fact that I said I am starting testing accuracy today. That means there will be more tests to come! Let’s see how this rifle does!

The test

I shot the rifle off a rest at 10 meters. The first shot, however, was from just 12 feet, because I wanted to know whether both those pellets were really going to hit inside the pellet trap from 10 meters. I don’t need any more pellets in the garage drywall!

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Schofield Number 3 BB revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Schofield BB revolver
Schofield BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • A new toy
  • Fatal flaw
  • Single action
  • Safety
  • Cartridge
  • The BB gun
  • Manual needs some work
  • Cartridges
  • Sights
  • Schofield is a rare firearm!
  • Cool!

A new toy

Oh, boy! Here we go again with another lookalike BB revolver. This Schofield BB gun is from the past. It’s a replica of S&W’s Schofield revolver. The Schofield was created from a Smith & Wesson New Model Number 3 revolver (often also called the American, to differentiate it from the Russian model) by Major George W. Schofield of the 10th cavalry. The major modification involved moving the barrel latch of this top-break revolver from the barrel to the frame of the gun, allowing the barrel to be broken open with one hand. Cavalry troops have to control horses, along with all their other duties as soldiers, so they want everything they use — guns, sabers, etc. — to work one-handed.

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Sheridan Blue Streak: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Blue Streak
My Sheridan Blue Streak was purchased new in 1978.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Not a shooter
  • You’ve got mice!
  • The problem grows
  • The rifle
  • Thumb safety
  • Rocker safety
  • Why so different?
  • Twenty caliber
  • Multi-pump
  • Accuracy
  • Trigger
  • Sights
  • Goodbye, Edie

Some readers asked me to do a memorial blog to my late wife, Edith. Today marks one year since she passed away, but this blog is still infused with her influence. So I thought I would tell you about her favorite airgun — the Sheridan Blue Streak.

Not a shooter

Edith was never a shooter. Even when she shot with me to get her Concealed Carry License, she wasn’t as interested in the shooting aspect as she was in self defense. But she had a soft spot in her heart for the Blue Streak and I’d like to tell you why.

You’ve got mice!

When we moved into our house in Maryland, the last thing the old owners told us was we had mice. There were woods all around us and game was plentiful. We figured with 9 housecats, there wouldn’t be any problem with mice, but we were wrong. Several cats were excellent mousers and caught a lot of them in the beginning, but they didn’t kill them right away. They would play with them, often breaking their legs and watching them squirm around on the floor. Edith had a soft spot for animals and could not abide that, so she asked me to teach her to shoot the Blue Streak, so she could finish them. This was almost a decade before The Airgun Letter was even a glimmer on the horizon.

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Webley Mark II Service: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Eley Wasps
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Hobby
  • Observations

Today we see how successful my redneck breech seal fix was. I’m hoping for success, but even if it comes I won’t leave the gun this way. I will size the new seal and install it, or I will accept reader Komitadjie’s kind offer to make me a new seal of the correct size. Either way I will fix the rifle properly. This is just a chance to demonstrate a field fix that can be used in a pinch.

Eley Wasps

Let’s get right to it. First up were the 5.6mm Eley Wasps. Ten of them averaged 371 f.p.s. That is an increase from 308 f.p.s. in Part 2, so the redneck breech seal appears to work.

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Let’s build a multi-pump!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • B.B. is on board
  • Benjamin Marauder
  • Weight and fit
  • Trigger
  • Number of shots
  • Repeater?
  • Quiet?
  • Power
  • Where is the pump tube?
  • Sights
  • Keep those power adjustments?
  • No, to a parts kit
  • Don’t even THINK it!
  • So what?
  • Crosman knows, too

I am not writing an historical report today, because something has crept into our discussions that needs to be addressed. I will make up for this by publishing an extra historical report next Tuesday, along with the Monday and Friday reports.

This will be a good report for airgun companies to read, because it comes straight from the grassroots users of your airguns. They are asking for a specific multi-pump pneumatic.

B.B. is on board

This discussion has been going on for many months — maybe even longer than a year. American airgunners say they would like a high-quality multi-pump pneumatic, and today we are going to look at all that might mean. I’ve just watched this from the sidelines until now, but I do have things to contribute, so today I’m going to start the dialog in ernest.

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Teach me to shoot: Part 12

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10
Part 11

This is the continuing fictional saga and guest report of a man teaching a woman to shoot. Today I will be taking over. I’m going to show you how to hold a 1911 pistol one-handed for the best accuracy. This was requested by reader levans, but several of you own 1911s, so this should be of interest to many.

This report covers:

  • Learned from a champion
  • Distinguished Pistol Shot badge
  • Elmer Keith knew something
  • It’s all in the hold and the trigger action
  • The thumb controls the recoil
  • Lock the elbow
  • Cantilever the shooting arm
  • Other pistols?

Learned from a champion

Readers who have been with us for years know this story, but for the benefit of the newer readers, here is how I learned this technique. I was running a pistol range for my cavalry squadron in the Army and the squadron commander, LTC Bonsall, arrived on range in his jeep. I had never seen a lieutenant colonel at a small arms range before. I’m sure they went, just never when I was running the range. The colonel introduced himself, because I hadn’t met him yet — he was that new. Then, he asked to qualify. Well, sure, he could qualify. It was his range, after all!

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MeoPro HD 80 Spotting Scope: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Meopta MeoPro HD 80
MeoPro HD 80 spotting scope from Meopta. Photo provided by Meopta.

This report covers:

  • Otho is interested
  • Attaching my iPhone to the spotting scope
  • Oh-oh!
  • Otho needed the Meopta
  • Fix the problem
  • Stable tripod!
  • How well does it work?

This is a continuation of my report on the MeoPro HD 80 spotting scope from Meopta. I have now purchased this scope, so it’s mine to use from now on. Every time I look at it, I see it for the first time. It’s like being at a party and seeing the prettiest girl there and envying the lucky guy who gets to go home with her — then realizing she’s with you!

Last time I told you about using the scope at the range for the first time. I mentioned it was possible to attach a smart phone to the scope so you could view your targets even larger, because the phone has a zoom capability that’s separate from the spotting scope. Today I want to tell you how that went.

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