Bersa BP9cc Part 2

Bersa BP9cc Part 2 Part 1

Learning the ways of subcompact carry

By Dennis Adler

The ASG Bersa BP9cc is an ideal gun for CCW training. Though larger than most subcompacts used for concealed carry, the majority of compact 9mm handguns are the approximate size of the Bersa BP9cc. The airgun is pictured with an Elite Survival Systems ballistic nylon belt clip holster (left) a Galco Yaqui paddle holster (center) and a DeSantis Nemesis pocket holster. All three are designed for compact semi-autos of approximate size to the Bersa.

While I prefer a CO2 training gun that is 100 percent correct to its cartridge-firing counterpart, like the Umarex S&W M&P40, the ASG Bersa BP9cc hits on so many important points that the magazine design almost becomes a secondary issue. What I like most about this particular airgun is the actual pistol it is based upon, a compact 9mm semi-auto that is just a little shorter in overall length than a Glock 19. It has the same simplicity of operation and many of the same fundamental features. The Bersa BPcc models remain slightly above the entry level pricing for a 9mm (.380 and .40 S&W) pistol, as does the price for the ASG CO2 model. Since the .177 caliber pistol uses an internal striker and has the same weight and basic handling of the cartridge models it offers a great opportunity to test the waters for a centerfire model and also work on trigger control, sighting, and most importantly for a compact pistol, determining the best means of carry for the gun. Aside from the cost of holsters, under $100 gets you started with the BP9cc airgun.

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Bersa BP9cc Part 1

Bersa BP9cc Part 1

Learning the ways of subcompact carry

By Dennis Adler

Since 1959 Bersa has been manufacturing well-built, affordable semi-auto pistols in Ramos Mejia, Argentina, and their first polymer-framed, striker-fired model, the BP9cc is available as a .177 caliber blowback action CO2 model. The ASG Bersa BP9cc has exceptional attention to detail and polished slide used on the 9mm duotone pistol.

Back in the 1980s I owned a Bersa .380 ACP semi-auto, it wasn’t a Walther PPK but it looked a lot like one and that was its biggest attraction. Bersa started out in the late 1950s building .22 caliber semi-autos and over the decades worked its way up to larger calibers. Their early guns all had a passing resemblance to either Walther or Beretta models, and not surprisingly, the company’s founders, Benso Bonadimani, Ercole Montini and Savino Caselli were Italian firearms engineers who immigrated to Argentina in the 1950s and established Bersa in the city of Ramos Mejia, the name you see on the slide of every Bersa model. Their first .22 LR semi-auto pistol was introduced in 1959. More than half a century later Bersa is an established manufacturer of well built but still affordable pistols. The company offers a complete line of .22LR, .380, 9mm and .40 S&W semi-autos (some that still look like a Walther PPK or PPK/S) and others, like the BP9cc, with a passing resemblance to a Glock. It is, however, its own unique design. BP9cc stands for Bersa Polymer 9mm Concealed Carry. Introduced in 2010, the 9mm semi-auto was the company’s first polymer-framed, striker-fired pistol, so for Bersa this is a groundbreaking design.

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Umarex Colt Special Combat Classic Part 2

Umarex Colt Special Combat Classic Part 2 Part 1

Choosing performance over authenticity

By Dennis Adler

If looks alone can sell a CO2 BB gun, the Umarex Special Combat sells itself. It is, unfortunately, a non-blowback 1911 semi-auto (not a terrible thing really), but also uses an older-type CO2 BB magazine with an exposed seating screw. The magazine’s capacity is 19 shots and is very easy to load with a locking follower and good sized loading port. The gun’s star attractions are an LPA-type fully adjustable rear sight and use of a DA/SA trigger design. With the hammer manually cocked for each shot, the gun is capable of consistent accuracy with an average trigger pull of 3 pounds, 11.5 ounces. Fired double action, trigger pull averages a moderate 8 pounds, 8 ounces.

The Umarex Colt Special Combat Classic, with its unusual DA/SA trigger design, actually has some basis in Colt history, although not as an actual production gun, but rather one originally developed back in the 1960s and later used for the U.S. military trials in the 1970s and early 1980s (the Joint Service Small Arms Program or JSSAP), when a replacement for the Model 1911A1 was being considered. It was called the Colt SSP, a 1911-style 9mm pistol intended to update the John M. Browning design. It was more of a hybrid combining design elements of the 1911, Browning Hi-Power and Sig P210, to create a 1911-style semi-auto with a higher capacity and double action/single action trigger system; essentially what Beretta had with the  Model 92FS, which was eventually chosen to replace the M1911 in 1985. Unlike today when almost every unsuccessful military trial gun becomes a new, high-tech civilian model, back in 1985 when the Colt SSP failed to win the military contract, the design was shelved and never put into production. In that respect, the Special Combat Classic offers a small part of that design with its DA/SA trigger. But even as a CO2 model, the idea is not fully executed.

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Umarex Colt Special Combat Classic Part 1

Umarex Colt Special Combat Classic Part 1 Part 2

An airgun with dual personalities

By Dennis Adler

What could be the best looking CO2 powered 1911 air pistol there is, the Umarex Colt Special Combat Classic is an interesting combination of features that make it unique among 1911 models. The polished slide bears the Colt logo and Rampant Colt emblem.

What would happen if Colt and Para USA got together and designed a Model 1911? It would certainly look like a custom-built gun, and if Para’s designers had their way it would have their famous LDA (Light Double Action) trigger, something Colt has never adapted to their 1911 semi-auto designs…until now. However, the only way to experience a Colt branded Model 1911 with a DA/SA trigger system is to try it in .177 caliber with the Umarex Colt Special Combat Classic.

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Sig Sauer Spartan 1911 Part 2

Sig Sauer Spartan 1911 Part 2 Part 1

Testing Sig’s latest CO2 Semi-Auto

By Dennis Adler

The latest CO2 offering from Sig Sauer is their blowback action model of the .45 ACP Spartan combat pistol. The airgun follows the lines of the Spartan with the addition of front slide serrations and a MIL-STD 1913 Picatinny rail to give the .177 caliber version a little more character, not that the Spartan needs it.

Sig Sauer has jumped into the blowback action CO2 airgun market with both barrels blazing and the introduction of two more models based on Sig Sauer 1911 production guns, the Sig Sauer Max Michel competition pistol and the Spartan combat model, the company’s two most unusual 1911 variations.

Today there are dozens of manufactures the world over building versions of the Model 1911 (the patents expired generations ago), but this was not always so. Up until the WWI, only Colt’s was building the Model 1911. Fast forward to the 21st century and both Remington and Ithaca produce 1911 models today (as they did during WWII), but you also have 1911s being manufactured in the U.S. by Springfield Armory, Sturm, Ruger & Co., Kimber, Wilson Combat, Auto Ordnance (the Thompson submachine gun company), Dan Wesson, Smith & Wesson, and Sig Sauer through its U.S. manufacturing division. In fact, today there are more 1911 variations produced in the U.S. and abroad than John M. Browning could have ever imagined.

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Sig Sauer Spartan 1911 Part 1

Sig Sauer Spartan 1911 Part 1 Part 2

Another evolution of John Browning’s classic

By Dennis Adler

There is no doubt that the Sig Sauer 1911 Spartan is an unusual looking pistol in any caliber. With its bronze-like finish, Greek lettering and Spartan helmet on the grips, this is a unique style from Sig Sauer. The .177 caliber model is brand new from Sig’s airgun division which bases all of its models on actual production centerfire handguns.

If it seems like there are more 1911s on the market today than ever before, that’s because there are. The fundamental design pioneered by John Moses Browning and the Colt’s Patent Fire-Arms Manufacturing Company in 1911 has endured for more than a century, even in its original form. Over the decades it has been improved upon, it has been modernized, retro-styled, lengthened, shortened, and modified in every conceivable fashion and caliber by everyone from Colt to Sig Sauer.

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The Airgun Experience is on vacation

The Airgun Experience is on vacation

The Airgun Experience is on vacation and will return July 11th with a new series of articles on the latest models from Sig Sauer, including the .177 caliber Spartan Model 1911.

During the break, I am posting 10 of my favorite articles from the past, with links for each day below. This is a great opportunity to reread, or for some, read one of these articles for the first time. Everyone have a great 4th of July!

Dennis Adler

  1. The Model 1895 Nagant Revolver

http://www.pyramydair.com/airgun-experience/model-1895-nagant-revolver/ ‎

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