How to mount a scope: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • What optically centering DOES NOT mean
  • What optically centering really is
  • How to optically center a scope
  • Why do we do it?
  • Field target
  • Counting clicks — mechanical centering
  • Erector tube return spring
  • A better way
  • What about left and right?
  • Why so anal?
  • Pragmatic approach
  • Summary

Today we are going to discuss optically centering a scope. It’s going to be a difficult report for me to write, because the subject does not have much merit for airgunners. So I will compensate by adding some things that do have merit. Let’s go!

What optically centering DOES NOT mean

Let’s start with what optical centering DOESN’T mean. The optical center of the scope is not the place at which there are an equal number of clicks up and down and side to side. I say that and some of you already know it and yet the website “RifleOpticsWorld” has an online article written by “Rifle Optics Team” that says that setting a scope to the optical center is simply returning it to the factory setting. Excuse me?????  read more


How to mount a scope: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The Design an Airgun contest
  • Air gun?
  • How to enter
  • I lost one entry
  • The Godfather’s Gold Gun drawing˜
  • On to today’s report on cant
  • Canting is not part of scope mounting
  • What is cant?
  • The cant test
  • What cant does
  • Things that affect cant
  • What canting can do
  • When precision is a must
  • Consistency
  • How to eliminate cant
  • High scopes
  • Where the level goes
  • Summary

The Design an Airgun contest

Apparently it took a while for many of you to realize this Design an Airgun contest was happening, so I’m extending the deadline to Friday, October 16. I’m challenging you to design an airgun that we readers can build!

I’m guessing it will be a BB gun, but it doesn’t have to be. It doesn’t even have to be a gun, as long as it shoots something at a target. If it is a gun I’m guessing it will be a smoothbore, but again, it doesn’t have to be.

Air gun?

When I say build an airgun, it doesn’t have to work with compressed air. The Daisy 179 pistol is considered an airgun, but in reality it is a catapult gun. And spring-piston guns don’t have compressed air until the instant they fire. read more


How to mount a scope: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Rest of the story
  • Why did it shoot high?
  • Today
  • One last remark
  • “Level” the scope
  • You cant
  • The bottom line
  • Other than springers
  • What’s next?

Rest of the story

In Part One we learned how to properly mount a scope on a spring-piston air rifle. Today I’ll start by telling you what happened with my friend’s Gamo Whisper that I scoped in that report. I shimmed the tube on the rear scope ring because my friend told me his rifle was shooting all over the place. To me that’s code for the scope is adjusted too high. The majority of them are. He had taken the scope off before bringing me the rifle so I was just guessing. Thinking I knew the problem,  I shimmed the new scope in the rear. Then I gave it back to my friend.

A week later he called and said he had shot it at a box 150 feet away and didn’t hit it. So I walked him through the 10-foot sight-in. He did it and called back — the gun shot 2-inches high at 10 feet — not two inches low like I said it would. Oh, oh! read more


How to mount a scope: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The olden days
  • What needs to be done
  • Eliminate cant
  • The tale
  • More information
  • The scope must be angled down
  • Adjusting the scope too far right is also bad
  • Not experts
  • Position the eyepiece
  • Adjustable scope mounts
  • Is it enough?
  • Points to remember
  • Summary

The olden days

When I started shooting in the 1950s, scopes were not that common, especially on airguns. I was as intrigued by them as anyone, believing that they increased the accuracy of whatever they were mounted on. 

Well, they don’t. What they do is make it easier to shoot accurately with a given airgun or firearm. But they can only do it if they are mounted on the gun correctly and then sighted in properly. This series is dedicated to addressing all that is inherent in both mounting a scope correctly and then sighting it in properly.

What needs to be done

To properly mount a scope there are several things to consider. Here is a list. read more


Umarex Fusion 2 CO2 rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Fusion 2
Umarex Fusion 2 CO2 repeater.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Scoped
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Magazine problems
  • RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle
  • H&N Baracuda Match 4.50mm heads
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Umarex Fusion 2 CO2 rifle.

The test

I shot the rifle from a rest at 10 meters. I wanted to give the rifle and scope an easy test, as I was actually looking for the most accurate pellets, in case I move back to shoot at 25 yards. I shot 9-shot groups with each pellet because the magazine holds 9 pellets.

Scoped

The Fusion 2 doesn’t have open sights so I scoped it. I mounted a UTG 2-7X44 Scout SWAT scope. I mounted it quickly for today’s test with the intention of shimming it at the rear for a longer range test if the Fusion 2 was accurate. read more


Air Venturi Avenger repeating air rifle: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Avenger
Air Venturi Avenger.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Air Arms 16-grain dome
  • Second target
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Second group of Falcons
  • Last group
  • Oh, oh!
  • Summary

Today I shoot the Air Venturi Avenger for accuracy at 50 yards. We already know this one is a winner. How good is it?

The test

I went to AirForce Airguns to shoot the rifle. They have a nice outdoor range that I had all to myself. I shot at 50 yards off my portable benchrest. The rifle was rested on a sandbag. I had filled it at home and didn’t bring an air tank to the range because I knew it had at least 90 good shots and there was no way I was going to shoot that many.

I shot from the single shot tray because I wanted nothing to get in the way of the best this rifle can do. The Meopta Optica6 scope was as sharp as ever, and could almost resolve the 10-dot of a 10-meter air rifle target at 50 yards! read more


Beeman R10: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R10
Beeman R10.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Scope
  • Sight in
  • JSB Exact RS
  • JSB Exact 
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Falcon
  • 10-shot group of Falcons
  • Shootin’ machine
  • Summary

Welcome to the last report on the Beeman R10 that I tuned. This will be the accuracy test at 25 yards.

The test

I shot the rifle off a sandbag rest at 25 yards. I used an artillery hold with my off hand back by the triggerguard. I shot 5-shot groups to test more pellets and then 10-shot groups when I found a good one.

Scope

I scoped the rifle with a UTG Bug Buster 3-12X32 scope. It fit the R10 quite well, and when you see my groups I think you will agree that the scope worked.

R10 scoped
The Bug Buster fit the R10 well.

Sight in

I knew the scope was shimmed to take care of moderate barrel droop so I fired two shots at 12 feet and was immediately able to move back to 25 yards. Shots three and four were used to refine the zero and then I fired the first 5-shot group. read more