Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman DPMS SBR
Crosman’s DPMS SBR full auto BB gun.

This report covers:

  • What is it?
  • Watch the video
  • The gun
  • Blowback
  • Controls
  • Disassembly
  • Stock
  • Forearm
  • Loading
  • Shot count
  • Bolt holdopen
  • Sights
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the Crosman DPMS SBR full-auto BB gun. First — the acronyms. DPMS = Defense Procurement Manufacturing Services. WHAT??? It’s a shop that was initially in Osseo, Minnesota and opened in 1985. It started manufacturing parts for military weapons like the M16. It’s now part of a larger conglomerate that’s located in Huntsville, Alabama. SBR = Short Barrel Rifle. Another name for a carbine, and, in this case, the rifle that was shortened was already a carbine.

What is it?

The DPMS SBR is Crosman’s select-fire BB gun that shoots 25 BBs per magazine. Select fire means both full and semiautomatic fire are available via the conventional M16 selector switch. Gun bashers will tell you that AR-15s are automatic, but in fact that is incorrect. Civilians in the U.S. may not purchase full auto firearms without a lengthy process that vets the owner, tying the gun to him by serial number, and costs $200 per firearm so registered. AR-15s are semiautomatic, only, so a selector switch applies to the full auto military platform, only. read more


2018 Pyramyd Air Cup: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Field Target meeting
A record 104 shooters receive their orientation briefing from Tyler Patner on the first day of the field target match.

This report covers:

  • The vendors – H&N
  • The vendors – Leapers
  • Public range
  • Gauntlet and Fortitude
  • Sig ASP20
  • More interesting airguns to come
  • Field target
  • Pistol match cancelled
  • World-class airguns
  • More to come

The Pyramyd Air Cup is a public event that combines airgun competitions, a public range, a chance to meet many of the vendors who make the airguns and accessories you read about and, most importantly, a chance to shoot airguns you have seen and heard about but could never try. A day at this event is worth a year of reading on the internet — this blog included.

The Cup was held at the Tusco Rifle Club in Midvale, Ohio, which is about midway between Cleveland and Columbus. It’s convenient to people living in a 500-mile radius, and this year I saw people from all over the U.S., including Florida, California and Hawaii. People had come from Canada and the UK, as well. The H&N general manager, Florian Schwartz, was there, and Tobias Schmidt represented Diana. Both men had come from Germany to be there. read more


My day at Sig Sauer: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

ASP20
Sig Sauer’s new ASP20 gas spring breakbarrel air rifle breaks ground in many areas!

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Why a gas spring?
  • Trigger
  • Why a breakbarrel?
  • Does the ASP20 have an internal shock absorber?
  • On with the build
  • Final assembly — the stock
  • The barrel
  • Off to the range
  • Shooting sensation
  • Cocking effort
  • Accuracy
  • Whisky 3 ASP 4-12X44 scope
  • Summary

Boy, is there a LOT of interest in this new rifle! You guys are asking a lot of very good questions about the new ASP20 breakbarrel rifle, as you should. I will begin by addressing some of the most prominent ones.

Why a gas spring?

Some call it a gas piston, others say gas ram, but we are all referring to the gas spring (the industry term for a spring that uses compressed gas in place of a coiled steel spring to do its job). Gas springs replace coiled steel mainsprings in spring-piston airguns. They are more modern and easier to make and obtain, they don’t take a set if left compressed, they are less susceptible to cold and, if the design is right, they are smoother operating. They also eliminate several parts that rattle and they remove some weight from the powerplant. read more


The Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellet
  • First attempt at pumping
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Air Arms Falcon pellet
  • The solution
  • The hold for pumping
  • Best pumping hold found
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Summary

This is the 25-yard test of the Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle. Today the rifle is scoped with the 3-12X32 UTG Bug Buster scope, and we will see what the Dragonfly can do.

Seneca Dragonfly scoped
The compact Bug Buster scope is a perfect compliment to the handy Dragonfly multi-pump.

The test

I shot 5 shots with each pellet from a rested rifle at 25 yards. That was because I was pumping the rifle 3 times for each shot, and with the scope occupying the place where I wanted to hold the rifle, pumping wasn’t convenient. I selected the best pellet from the 10-meter test and 3 new ones, since the others I tested at 10 meters didn’t do so well. At the end of the test I decided to select the best pellet and shoot one final 10-shot group. read more


The TexanSS: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TexanSS
TexanSS big bore air rifle from AirForce.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • First comments
  • Bubble Leveler
  • Collar Buttons are a no-go at 100 yards
  • 210 SWC is still a great bullet
  • Balle-Blondeau-talk
  • Balle-patent
  • Balle Blondeau
  • 355-grain flat point dogbone
  • Ton shoots at 100 yards
  • One more test

I had the Umarex Gauntlet out to shoot at 50 yards last week but the day was just too windy. Once I got it sighted-in for 50 yards the wind picked up and blew the pellets all around. I wanted this test to be a good one between the magazine and the single-shot tray, and it wasn’t going to happed this day. So I brought out the TexanSS that has no difficulty shooting in the wind.

Today I will show you how the AirForce TexanSS big bore performs at 100 yards. I have spent several days at the range to get today’s results. That’s why it took me so long. read more


Umarex Gauntlet: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex Gauntlet.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

This report covers:

  • 50-yard test
  • Time to fold
  • Scope mount problem
  • Problem solved!
  • Sight-in
  • 25-yard group
  • Summary

Today I will bring you up to date on all that has been done with the Umarex Gauntlet PCP rifle. It has been two and one-half months since you read anything about this rifle, but I have been doing things and have tried to test the Gauntlet before now. Here is what happened.

50-yard test

I went to the range in early April for a 50-yard test. Unfortunately that day I had also invited a member of my church out to zero his AR-15, and it turned out he did not know how to do it. I ended up spending a lot of time getting him zeroed, plus I lent him my sandbag that I would normally use for any 50-yard PCP test. I shot the Gauntlet off a pile of wadded up rags and gun bags. Even so, the test was still good, if not ideal. read more


Umarex Forge combo: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Forge
Umarex Forge.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Trigger
  • The test
  • Accuracy — JSB Exact RS
  • Accuracy— JSB Exact Heavy
  • Accuracy— Crosman Premier Light
  • What next?
  • Final group
  • Evaluation
  • Summary

Today I complete the report on the Forge from Umarex. This is a breakbarrel rifle with a gas spring and … Well, you can read the past posts to catch up.

I’m running this test because the last time we looked at the Forge I felt the poor 4X32 scope that was provided with it might not have extracted all the accuracy the rifle can produce. I vowed to return and test it with a better scope and today the Force is mounted with the Aeon 8-32 AO scope with trajectory reticle, which is one of the best scopes I own. You can read about it here.

The test

This will be 10 shots with each pellet from a rested rifle at 25 yards. I started with the conventional artillery hold but soon discovered the Forge can be rested directly on the sandbag. I used the artillery hold in the last test, so that may make a difference today. read more