FWB 110 target rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

FWB 110
FWB 110 target rifle. I’m the one who cut off both ends of the gun in this photo.

This report covers:

  • FWB target rifles
  • First target rifle
  • How rare and what is it worth?
  • What’s it like?
  • Sliding compression chamber
  • Same as a 300
  • Trigger
  • What does it feel like?
  • Summary

I was going to run the Daisy 99 today, but this opportunity to review the FWB 110 came along and things were just right for it. How about I do Part 2 of the Daisy 99 on Monday?

Most of today’s pictures were provided by Tommy Cupples. My thanks to him for their use.

FWB target rifles

After World War II the world of airguns got a jump start from the reorganization of economies worldwide. In many countries there was disposable cash to spend and airguns vied for a share of it. In Germany the production of fine target air rifles like the Weihrauch HW55 and the Walther LG50-series brought formal airgun competition to the forefront. By the 1960s, things had heated up in both the competition realm as well as in the innovation and production of the guns. There were national titles to be won, and, before long, a world cup! read more


ASG CZ75 SP-01 Shadow BB pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord

Writing as B.B. Pelletier

ASG SP-01-pistol

ASG’s CZ 75 SP-01 Shadow BB pistol is large and heavy. The guns they are shipping have red fiberoptic sights in front, like those found on the firearm.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Function alike
  • To be honest…
  • How to test
  • The test
  • Accuracy Daisy BBs
  • Accuracy ASG Blasters
  • Accuracy Dust Devils
  • What now?
  • Discussion
  • More to come

Today is accuracy day for the ASG CZ75 SP-01 Shadow BB pistol, and there is more besides. As you know, I am very excited about this air pistol because of its realism. The shooting population thinks that all lookalike air pistols are good substitutes for the firearms they copy, but I have had reservations about that for years. Lookalike pistols have been with us a long time, but pistols that function alike are relatively recent. I think this BB pistol is one of them. read more


Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman PCP
Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Baracuda Match
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • JSB Beasts
  • Conclusion
  • What now?

Happy birthday, United States of America!

Today I am testing the Beeman QB Chief precharged pneumatic air rifle for accuracy at 25 yards. I mounted the UTG 3-12X32 Bug Buster scope, which looks and feels ideal for this rifle. I can’t think of a better match. It comes with Weaver/Picatinny rings, but since the Chief has 11mm dovetails, and since I had the scope already installed in UTG Accu-Sync 11mm rings for the Dragonfly test, I just switched the scope to the QB Chief.

The test

Today’s test will be at 25 yards off a rest. The trigger was adjusted in Part 4, so the rifle should be ready to go. read more


The importance of bullet-to-barrel alignment and fit: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Why go to the effort?
  • Ten shots in 0.2-inches at 200 yards
  • So what?
  • Other airgun breeches
  • Always liked single shots
  • Summary

I am writing this report for a number of reasons. The main one is because all you readers are interested in accuracy, and today’s topic is an important component of that. Yesterday reader Vana2, who goes by the name Hank, asked me if the Daisy 499 could be converted to a magazine. Here are both his comment and my answer.

——————————————
Question about feed mechanisms and accuracy on the BB guns…
The 499 billed as the most accurate BB gun and it is a single shot muzzle loader.
Considering that steel BBs are not likely to be deformed in the magazine and they are held in position with a magnet, would there be any technical reason that the 499 could [not] be magazine fed?
Just seems that muzzle loading is a little inconvenient.
Welcome to July… Happy Monday!! 🙂
Hank
—————————————————
Hank,
That tight barrel is the reason for muzzle loading. Did you know that Harry Pope built his breechloaders to have their bullets muzzle loaded? It was for a different reason, but they were called muzzle loading breechloaders.
That said, I suppose a magazine would be possible. But target arms are typically single shot so I guess Daisy never saw the need.
If I hadn’t argued with them in the 1990s, they wouldn’t have ever sold the 499 to the public. They didn’t think people would pay the price, and were shocked by the response.
B.B.
—————————————————
When I told him that, I figured it would raise some questions, so today I want to discuss bullet-to-barrel alignment and fit, which in our world is pellet-to-barrel, most of the time. read more


Daisy Model 99 Target Special: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Daisy 99
Daisy Model 99 Target Special.

This report covers:

  • Not what I expected
  • Peep sight
  • Front sight
  • Sling
  • Action
  • Stock and forearm
  • Gravity-feed magazine
  • Forced-feed magazine
  • Three variations of the Model 99
  • 99 accuracy
  • Daisy 299
  • Comparison to the 499
  • Summary

Welcome to July! Today I thought I would start looking at the Daisy Model 99 Target Special that I acquired at the recent Texas airgun show. I know reader RidgeRunner is anticipating this report and perhaps others are, as well.

For the readers who are awaiting the next Diana model 23 rifle report, know that I am working on it in the background and hope to have something for you very soon.

And I learned something very important this weekend. Daisy also sold lead shot for the Targeteer. It was obviously number 6 birdshot, and it makes perfect sense, because it would have been far cheaper than heading steel wire to make steel shot. Just buy the shot and repackage it. We know it works, and it probably works better than the steel shot. The tubes of shot I bought from Ebay were all lead shot. I felt cheated until I did the research and discovered lead was also correct. The learning never ends. Now let’s look at the Daisy 99 Target Special. read more


Daisy Targeteer shooting gallery: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

Targeteer shooting gallery
Daisy Targeteer shooting gallery.

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • Ebay comes through!li>
  • Target
  • The test
  • First 10 shots
  • What about Daisy steel shot?
  • Bottom line

Today is accuracy day for the old Daisy Targeteer I’m testing. In Part two I showed you how I solved the feeding problem and got my pistol back to operational condition, though “operational” is a stretch. It’s weak and there is nothing that can be done about it. Today I will show you how I made a target to test the accuracy of the Targeteer.

Velocity

This is just a reminder of what we are dealing with. I have to shoot either original Daisy steel BBs, which are collectable in their own right, or number 6 birdshot. The birdshot is easy enough to get, but it has to be sorted by dropping it through the shot tube. If you don’t you’ll get one stuck and have to deal with it. The Daisy BBs go about 120 f.p.s. and the birdshot goes about 105 f.p.s., so neither one is powerful enough to go through a paper target. I will address that in a moment, but first let me tell you what I did about the shot. read more


The Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Seneca Dragonfly
Air Venturi Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellet
  • First attempt at pumping
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Air Arms Falcon pellet
  • The solution
  • The hold for pumping
  • Best pumping hold found
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Summary

This is the 25-yard test of the Seneca Dragonfly multi-pump pneumatic rifle. Today the rifle is scoped with the 3-12X32 UTG Bug Buster scope, and we will see what the Dragonfly can do.

Seneca Dragonfly scoped
The compact Bug Buster scope is a perfect compliment to the handy Dragonfly multi-pump.

The test

I shot 5 shots with each pellet from a rested rifle at 25 yards. That was because I was pumping the rifle 3 times for each shot, and with the scope occupying the place where I wanted to hold the rifle, pumping wasn’t convenient. I selected the best pellet from the 10-meter test and 3 new ones, since the others I tested at 10 meters didn’t do so well. At the end of the test I decided to select the best pellet and shoot one final 10-shot group. read more