What to oil – Part 3 Finishing the spring guns

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today we’ll finish with spring guns. In Part 2, we learned how to oil the piston seal and breach seal on a springer; now it’s time to discuss all the other stuff.

What else is there?
How a gun is designed determines where it needs to be lubricated. A breakbarrel, for example, has fewer places to lube than a sidelever or underlever. But if you think in terms of friction, you should be able to figure out the lube points on any new gun, whether it comes with a manual or not.

Cocking mechanisms
The cocking effort must be transmitted through some kind of mechanism. In the Gat-type guns that have push-barrel cocking (The Crosman M1 Carbine, for example), the mechanism is greatly simplified, and the need for lubrication is reduced. Still, they have surfaces in contact with one another as the barrel slides back to cock the gun. Those need some kind of lube. Oil is probably better than grease because Gat guns have a long run of close tolerances, and you don’t want the lube to gum up the action.

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The AirForce match sight set – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Happy Thanksgiving!

Part 1

In the first report, I told you this sight set is the Edge sight set, but that was incorrect. The front sight in this set is not the same sight that’s on the Edge rifle, though the two look similar at first glance. How they differ is the subject of today’s report.

The photograph on the Pyramyd Air web page is one of the actual front sight used on the Edge. What I’m showing you here is a pre-production prototype that will become the front sight of the set when it’s released by AirForce in a week or two. After today’s blog, you’ll understand why the difference is important.

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Walther Talon Magnum – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today I’ll look at the accuracy for the Walther Talon Magnum. You’ll remember that this rifle is the .177 caliber version of the Walther Falcon Hunter, which comes in .22 and .25 caliber.

The first step was to mount the scope that comes with the rifle. It’s a 3-9×32 that has no parallax adjustment, so whenever you shoot closer than about 25 yards you dial the magnification down until the image becomes clear. The scope comes already inserted in one-inch rings, so all you have to do is mount the rings on the base that’s on the spring tube of the rifle.


The scope rings are already installed on the scope. The bases have no scope stop, but you can use the stop on the rifle base.

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Airgunner’s Christmas Gift Guide – Part 2 Gifts under $50

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1 – Under $25

Here’s a link to Pyramyd Air’s official Gift Guide.

Sorry to rush things, but tempus fugit. Today’s post will include some airguns.

For those who are not familiar with these guns, here are a few pointers.

1. For target practice, the velocity can be very low–350 f.p.s. is all that’s needed.

2. None of these airguns are recommended for hunting, but a few that get up to 750 f.p.s. have limited use in pest elimination.

3. BB guns such as the Red Ryder and the Crosman 760 shoot steel BBs that bounce back from hard targets. Be sure to get safety glasses for everyone who will be in the vicinity of the shooter. Get a good BB trap that will stop the BBs without letting them bounce back. Lead pellets do not bounce back, but they still require a good pellet trap for safe shooting.

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Big bore airgun hunt – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

The Wildlife Ranch puts you up for a night, so there are no room rents but you’re on your own for food. Fortunately, the town of Mason has several nice restaurants, as well as a small grocery store. We were in town during the height of deer season, which runs all November and December, and everywhere we went we ran into other hunting parties hunting on different ranches. The signs in every building in town told us that hunting is the principal industry in this central Texas community.


Texas Wildlife Ranch in Mason, Texas was the headquarters for our two hunts.


Inside the store, a wide variety of game animals are displayed. The full-body mount on the right is an aoudad ram–our first quarry.

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HW 55 Tyrolean – Part 7 Time to test the tune

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

Today, we’ll put the HW55 back together (finally!) and see how well it performs. You’ll recall that I cleaned, adjusted and lubricated the trigger in the last report. This will be the first time I’ve been able to examine the job with the rifle in the stock. That makes a huge difference in the feel.

Which mainspring?
You may also recall that I had a choice of mainsprings to try. In part 5 of the report, I talked about how to measure a mainspring before fitting it to the rifle. Well, I was surprised this time. The spring I chose was so close to the internal dimensions that, when it compressed, it became too large to fit and the rifle could not be cocked. The length was never an issue because I couldn’t break the barrel far enough to cock it anyway. My initial plan was to remove coils to get the right length, but that didn’t take the width of the compressed spring into account. On to plan B.

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Airgunner’s Christmas Gift Guide Gifts under $25

by B.B. Pelletier

Here’s a link to Pyramyd Air’s official Gift Guide.

A reader asked for this about a month ago, and it’s time I got started. I’m breaking this into price points so gift-givers can choose their limits. The way this works is you send your relatives and friends to this page, and I point them to things I think airgunners might enjoy. Each item will be linked, but as we get closer to Christmas, Pyramyd Air will run out of many things, so have a fallback plan in place.


Santa leases back the Pyramyd Air Warehouse for special Christmas gifts.

Note to the gift-giver
The things in these Gift Guide blogs are my choices for airgunners. Please ask your favorite airgunner to point you in the right direction, so I don’t steer you wrong. I’m doing this because I know how difficult it can be to find a gift for someone with a specialized interest like airguns.

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