Beeman RS1000H dual-caliber rifle combo – Part 5.22 barrel test 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Okay, today we have another hot topic. A return to the Beeman RS1000-H, this time to test the .22-caliber barrel.

Barrel fit
Reader Don expressed concern for how the .22 barrel fits in the test rifle. He purchased one and the .22 barrel was loose, though the .177 was fine. Pyramyd exchanged it and the second rifle had the same problem, so I was interested in how tight our .22 barrel fits.

Well, Don, this one fits tight – at least at this time. I will keep a watch on it as I test this caliber and give you an update as we go. One thing I will mention: the rifle comes with a second screw in a small baggie with the Allen wrench and an o-ring. Is it possible that screw would tighten the fit of your .22 barrel? Mine didn’t need it because the .22 barrel fit the same as the .177.

Velocity testing
By this time, the rifle has over 150 shots on the powerplant. I expect a lot of the initial dieseling to be over and the velocities to be more consistent.

Crosman Premiers
Ever the “standard ” pellet in .22 caliber, .22-caliber Crosman Premiers weigh 14.3 grains, nominally. In the test rifle, they averaged 694 f.p.s., but one shot recorded a very odd 458 f.p.s. I thought it might have been due to a lighting malfunction with the chronograph, but the same thing happened with other pellets, so it isn’t an anomaly – the powerplant is malfunctioning. Given the average velocity, which doesn’t include the slow shot, the pellet generates 15.3 foot-pounds, which is a little low for this rifle. Based on the .177 results, I had expected power in the 17 foot-pound region, at least.

Beeman Kodiaks
Beeman Kodiaks were consistent, averaging 544 f.p.s. The extreme spread was 24 f.p.s., which is fine for a springer that’s new. Energy was 13.75 foot-pounds for this 21-grain pellet, which is low. But I expect the heavier pellets to generate less muzzle energy in a spring-piston gun.

RWS Hobbys
RWS Hobbys will have to serve as the lightweight pellet for our test, because they’re the lightest .22s I have. At 11.9 grains, they’re pretty light, though there are some synthetics that shave another several tenths. They averaged 748, but two shots went 517 and 500, respectively. This was now officially starting to concern me. If I use the high average, the energy is 15.42 foot-pounds.

Beeman Silver Ace
The Beeman Silver Ace is an old pellet dating back to the 1970s. The “piston-ring” look was really popular back in the 1978-1982 timeframe. They’ve been made by several different manufacturers and in this test the vintage pellets I used averaged 14.1 grains. Today’s Silver Aces weigh 1.1 grains more. Mine averaged 689 f.p.s., with two pellets as slow as 441 and 430. Taking the high average, the energy is 14.87 foot-pounds.

RWS Superpoints
RWS Superpoints were the last pellet I tried. They exhibited a reversal of performance, with five pellets going 530, 404, 444, 439 and 437, respectively, and only one that went an expected 705. I did not finish the string, and now I have some concerns about the health of the powerplant.

The barrel remained firmly in place throughout all testing, so that’s a plus. But the muzzle energy didn’t increase as expected. Instead, it went down. Clearly this rifle works most efficiently as a .177.

Next, I’ll test accuracy, then I’ll retest the .177 for velocity, though now I don’t hold a lot of hope that the rifle will have broken in as I thought before. Stay tuned for an interesting test!

41 thoughts on “Beeman RS1000H dual-caliber rifle combo – Part 5.22 barrel test 1

  1. Hmmm… sumthin’ sounds a wee bit fishy. When I tried a .22 barrel on my well used AR1000 (the barrel and pivot block was from a Hammerli Storm – perfect fit) I seem to remember getting around 18ft-lbs. That was after generating about 15-16ft-lbs with the .177 barrel.

    I wonder if your example is taking an early vacation…




  2. Now most people would disagree. There seems to ne a market for multiple-caliber air rifle – hence the AirForce line that’s offered in three changeable calibers.

    This concept dates back to the 1920s for spring guns and to the mid-1800s (at least) for PCPs. Currently there are several manufacturers offering dual-caliber guns.

    I, however, agree with you. I wouldn’t be inclined to change the barrel of a gun I liked. It takes a compelling need for me to change the barrel in my Talon SS or Condor. I’m happy with .22 caliber in both.

    I never liked the concept in firearms, either. I kept my Thompson Center in .44 magnum, and when I had one, I kept my Colt Ace in .22.

    But I think you and I are in the minority.

    B.B.




  3. B.B.

    I could use some help with a bit of shooting history. I read a book by Stephen Hunter called Pale Horse Coming which is very entertaining. If that guy doesn’t know about shooting in great depth he’s got me fooled. Anyway, the plot has to do with assembling an epic cast of master gunfighters to clean out a nest of villains. These gunfighters are based in part on historical figures–the book has a disclaimer that there is no attempt to impute the events of the novel to any historical figures whom the characters resemble. As you can see, some of the characters are easy to identify, but I was wondering if there are identities for the others or whether they are just filler.

    Audie Ryan – Audie Murphy the WWII hero.

    Elmer Kaye – Elmer Keith, handgunning guru.

    Jake O’Brian – ? a super rifle shot who promotes the use of smaller bullets, like the .270, for long-range shooting.

    Ed McGriffith – ? an expert with revolvers who can throw five glass balls in the air and shoot them before they hit the ground (“Hell, I can hit four before they reach their apogee.”)

    Charlie and Bill – ? forget the last names, maverick lawmen on the Mexican border who are expert with revolvers. Charlie also favors the Browning Auto-5 shotgun with a duck bill spreader (“Wooowee!”).

    Any ideas about the unknowns? To all, if you like good writing about shooting, this book and the rest of the series are very entertaining and would make fun reading for the holidays.

    Matt




  4. BB and Sumo,

    Thank you for your replies last week regarding my question about the “88″ and refilling PCP’s.

    The links came in very handy, and answered most of my questions.

    I’ve decided the hand pump is the way to go for me.

    The only questions have left are:

    Is there one pump you would recommend over all others? I’ll be buying an Airforce Rifle.

    On those pumps with moisture filters, do the filters have to be replaced?

    Marc


  5. Marc,

    I recommend the AirForce pump because it’s made for the job and because it’s rated to 3600 psi. It’s also the only pump I know of that has been pumped for 50 hours straight without stopping to cool.

    The Moisture filters are dessicant-filled, so after time they do have to be changed. Whether they can be reused after heating I don’t know.

    I don’t believe they work that well.

    B.B.




  6. So are you going to return the rifle to Pyramyd? I think you should (to test their return policy and time, which I have heard is great) and to see if the replacement has any powerplant issues. This may be indicative of a quality issue within the rifle from this maker and should be exposed(poor seal fit, uneven cylinder honing etc). It would be interesting to see if you got the lemon out of the bunch or if they are all lemons. Or you could send to a pro tuner. He/she could examine it, diagnos the problem and necessary fixes. Then you could blog the progress and see what the rifle turns out to be in the end. Just a thought.
    Nathan



  7. B.B. and Loneshooter,

    Thanks, now I have names to plug into Google and Wikipedia. The last names of the characters are so close to the originals that I’m sure you would know the right answers if I could remember them. Tilghman sounds right from what I recall, but I’ll check for that and Charlie’s last name. The only other things I remember about Charlie are that he was an egomaniac and not necessarily fun to be around although very colorful–the temperaments of the originals seem to have been reproduced faithfully. Charlie won 4 national bullseye revolver championships and liked to cut the front of his triggerguard away from his revolvers for faster access. This posed the risk of blowing his foot off but he seemed up to the challenge.

    I forgot to mention that the main character of the book is Earl Swagger WWII Marine, Medal of Honor winner, and father of Bob Lee Swagger–the main character of the recent movie Shooter with Mark Wahlberg which was based on the book Point of Impact. The book is much better than the movie.

    Matt


  8. Seems to me that when you put together a package like this and sell it for $180, there can’t be a lot of money spent on QC. Frequently it’s cheaper to take the bad ones back rather than go through the trouble of catching them at the factory.

    So I’d suspect that there’s a fair chance you just got a bad apple (especially since it’s from the Shanghai factory). We’d hate to see your review end up on a sour note because of that… a review of a defective rifle is really of limited value to your readers! I do hope you’ll consider exchanging it for another and trying it again.



  9. BB,

    I am very interested in the AirForce hand pump, but does it adapt to airguns other than AirForce easily? For example, is there a hose with a female Foster end that will attach to the AirForce pump?

    Also, are you saying that the moisture filter doesn’t work well? If so, is this true for all hand pumps?

    Thanks,
    .22 multi-shot




  10. B.B.,
    I found some more info on the Beeman site about our guys use of air rifles to snipe in Iraq:
    The article discusses a WWII era Girandoni style sniper weapon and then goes on to say, “Why would a modern sniper want a functional version of an ancient airgun when automatic weapons were as close as the first German soldier that could be waylaid? The answer dramatically comes from the above notes and the fact that an American maker is now doing a small, but excellent, business supplying coalition troops in the near East with high power 9mm repeating PCP air rifles, complete with silencers and nightsights. Unlike a firearm, such a weapon, without sound, flash, or smoke, does not attract return fire – esp. in reduced light situations – the deadly projectile just seems to come from no-where!”

    Fascinating. Does anyone have pictures?

    Best regards,
    Kevin
    Kevin




  11. Nate in MA,

    Thanks for that link. If there’s anyone here who doesn’t belong to the NRA, they should view this, then join and support the fight for the 2nd amendment.

    /Shooter



  12. .22 multi-shot,

    The AirForce pump can be set up to fill any airgun, but it doesn’t come with a female foster. You would have to put one on with adapters that Pyramyd Air doesn’t sell.

    As for the remark about the moisture filters, that’s only my opinion. I just don’t see how air sucked rapidly through dessicant has time to do anything.

    B.B.


  13. Kevin and everyone,

    I would prefer to not talk about the possible use of airgun as sniper weapons. This website is dedicated to sporting airguns, and they have no purpose killing humans.

    If you want to discuss that subject, please take it to one of the forums that doesn’t mind the discussion.

    B.B.




  14. BB,

    Thank you for the AirForce pump information. What is the connector that is directly on the pump?

    Sorry about my interest in the military, 9mm PCP. My interest comes from living in the country where cougars sometimes roam. I have no problem with them being here, but if one attacks my children, I will. We have taken precautions such as having the kids carry pepper spray when they are outside, but it seems that animal behavior is becoming less predictable.

    Thanks,
    .22 multi-shot


  15. Kevin,

    Thank you. That is a great article on Girandoni style airguns! I thought you meant the Beeman company web site.

    .22 multi-shot


  16. .22 Multi-shot,

    I wouldn’t go after a cougar with a 9mm air rifle, but a bigger one might do. However cougars are dangerous animals. I would want a repeating firearm.

    The AirForce pump comes with a fitting that extends from the pump base with female 1/4″ BSPP threads.

    B.B.


  17. Thank you! The repeating firearm would be my choice, but I haven’t been able to convince my wife. She tolerates airguns at this point.


  18. .22 Multi-shot,

    I understand. My wife was ambivalent toward firearms when we married. She had shots them (first husband had a Ruger .22 pistol), but didn’t care one way or the other. Until we had rats.

    When our house was invaded by rats caused by local development, she became extremely interested in shooting and pellet guns. She killed over 19 rats in all (I think the number was actually 29) inside of two months.

    That got her interested in shooting and from there everything went well. We lived in Maryland at the time and had a criminal neighbor, so my wife learned how to shoot a .357 and a 20-gauge shotgun. The local police took 30 minutes to respond and we had several incidents when a quicker response was required. She still shoots, and she supports my firearms shooting enthusiastically. She also became an NRA Life Member with me.

    Perhaps need is the greatest motivator?

    B.B.


  19. Yep, I’m just waiting and hoping that I can involve her without pushing. Thanks for the encouragement! I think it is fantastic that your wife participates in the sport with you!

    .22 multi-shot


  20. BB,
    Your SS1000 177cal and 22cal test results so far are similar to my results. The first one had a real bad fit on the 22cal barrel. It literally rattled even after the set screw was tight. The second one fit much better but still seemed to move a bit… but it was hard to really say for sure.

    I didn’t even fire the first one in 22cal. The second I ran a few hundred rounds through both barrels and of course (per you coaching cleaned the barrel first). Just could never get any repeatable accuracy from the 22cal. Seeing your power fluctuations in the 22cal a logical reason seems to exist. And yes I did try several different pellets… about the same ones you tried.

    I found using the 177 cal barrel worked better. The 22cal barrel just wouldn’t settle down. Even tried having another shooter give it try; he did a bit better but not that much better. We could get three or four or maybe several good shots and then it would break down and be all over the place for a few shots.

    Like you it seemed the SS1000T was a nice rifle and it was just too bad the one flaw had to be so major. The two I shot had what I considered a very nice trigger much better than Gamo.

    Still very glad to see you reviewing this rifle.

    Thanks,
    Don

    ps… to those who commented on the PA return policy. From my experience once couldn’t expect any better customer service than what was provided. Will buy again even if the price is a bit higher than others may offer… would hate to be stuck with the SS1000T lemon.


  21. Don,

    Thanks for that feedback. I haven’t tested the .22 for accuracy yet, but I plan to. And I plan to re-run the velocity test under different circumstances, just in case it was my chronograph that was acting up.

    B.B.


  22. BB,
    Did you end up returning the SS1000T or are you going to research the 22cal issue a bit more using the tested rifle?

    Thank you,
    Don


  23. Don,

    I set the Beeman SS1000H aside because of the velocity variation. It’s still here in my office waiting for me to complete the test, but I have to decide whether I want to continue with this rifle or order another.

    B.B.


  24. In respect to Stephen Hunter’s entertaining roman à clef, Pale Horse Coming, the character of “Bill” is most definitely based on the late Bill Jordan, while “Charlie” is a not-very-thinly-disguised Colonel Charles Askins.


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