What does “Accurized” mean?

by B.B. Pelletier

The term ACCURIZED is so common in airgunning that people use it without thinking. What does it mean?

As far as I can tell, Robert Law of Air Rifle Headquarters (ARH) was the first to use the term ACCURIZE in relation to airguns. You would think that he had a specific definition in mind, but when you read what he wrote in his Fall/Winter 1979 catalog to describe the term, you’ll see it doesn’t seem to amount to much.


A late ARH catalog gave the definition of accurization.

“Accurization involves having a highly trained specialist totally disassemble a gun. Each individual part is cleaned and inspected. The ultimate space-age lubricant or bonded coating is then applied to each component for optimum performance and friction reduction. This stabilizes the cylinder compression mechanism and greatly reduces normal wear. Both accuracy and velocity improve. Recoil is often reduced by as much as 60 percent.”

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Why does my rifle shift its aim point? – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Okay, today I’d like to finish this report. There’s a lot to cover, but I won’t go into detail like I did in the first two parts. Remember, the complaint was a point-of-impact shift from one day to another AND a shift in the middle of a shot string. Those two separate reasons could each cause a POI shift, but if BOTH of them are happening, it can only be caused by parallax or a broken scope or loose mount. I think Hegshen is careful enough to catch the bad scope and loose mount, so I had to go with parallax. But there are other causes of impact shift.

Cause 1. Positioning of the cocking knob
This is an AirForce quirk, because they have a cocking knob that must be rotated into one of two locking notches on either side of the receiver. Fail to do it, and the bolt will move during firing, causing drastic changes in the amount of compressed air that gets behind the pellet. That will cause inaccuracy and POI shifts. When I was at AirForce and answered phone calls about accuracy problems, this was one of the main causes of those problems. AirForce made a video about how to operate the rifle and put the instructions in the owner’s manual. If a shooter didn’t pay attention to those instructions, they often had accuracy problems. Some guys went to the extreme of looping a rubber band around the bolt handle and the gun, so the handle would always be pulled into the notch when not being used to cock and load the gun.

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10-meter rifle – Part 3 The Olympic rifles

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 2/The budget rifles, continued

Collector alert!
Collectors, there is an estate sale going on right now on the internet. Many of the guns have already been sold, but there are still a few choice items left. Also, there’s a treasure trove of old airgun literature, including a rare first edition Beeman catalog. The site says estate auction, but what you do is make an offer to them. If they find it acceptable, they contact you, and you buy the gun or whatever.

Take this link to the estate sale.

There is more than what’s listed. All the rifles are listed, but there are a couple of air pistols and a lot more literature than what you see on the site. Be sure to use the scroll bar and to click on the other links on the left side of the page. The former owner passed away a few years ago and his brother is helping the widow sell the items. I’ve already had a transaction with them and everything went well. Be sure to ask about condition because the photos do not show detail.

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Why does my rifle shift its aimpoint? – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Before I begin, I’m going to break my rule about commenting on forums. I read a thread about me on the Yellow Forum yesterday and was surprised to see some very complimentary remarks. I usually don’t get that. Several who commented also mentioned that they don’t agree with me all the time, and I’d like to say here and now – NEITHER DO I! I have changed my mind many times in the pursuit of this hobby and I bet I’m not done, yet. Just a few weeks ago I discovered a new wrinkle on the artillery hold that makes it work a lot better than the way I described it in the Beeman R1 book.

I’m not fishing for compliments, but I’d like to thank everyone who added to that thread.

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How to lubricate pellets

by B.B. Pelletier

In last week’s report about Crosman pellets, I received two comments on how to properly lubricate pellets. If two people asked, there are 40 more in the wings waiting to hear the answer.

When to lubricate
Before we know how to lube pellets, let’s learn when it’s needed. I already mentioned that Crosman pellets are hardened with antimony, causing them to smear lead when driven to higher velocities. In truth, this can be anything above maybe 750 f.p.s., depending on the smoothness of the barrel they pass through. When the velocity moves above 850-900 f.p.s., the leading becomes almost a certainty in just about any gun. In spring-piston guns, every time the gun fires, the piston blows a tiny amount of oil vapor into the barrel. This oil is cumulative and thus keeps the barrel lightly lubricated. So, unless the gun has been tuned with moly and has no chamber oil in it, it doesn’t need to be oiled.

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Why does my rifle shift its aim point? – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Before I start, Pyramyd Air is closing out the Walther RedStorm pistol and is offering them at a terrific savings. This will be your last time to get this pistol.

This will be a series that explores one of the most interesting and confusing conundrums of airgunning – the point of impact shift. I hear about it frequently and the complaint sounds like this. “I get my rifle sighted in, then come back to it in a day or so, only to find that the point of impact has shifted. If I sight-in again, when I come back to the gun, the POI has shifted once more. The gun is very accurate, but why can’t I keep the groups in the same place?”

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Crosman Pellets They weren’t always Premiers!

by B.B. Pelletier

Before I begin today, I must retract something I recently said. Several days ago, I showed you a photo of the new Crosman Outdoorsman 2250XE I saw at the SHOT Show. I told you the pistol would be sold only by Crosman, through their Custom Shop. That was incorrect. In fact, Pyramyd Air is proud to now offer the Outdoorsman 2250 XE in their Crosman lineup. I also got it in my head that it was a pistol with a shoulder stock. It’s not…it’s a rifle. It’ll be available in .22 caliber when it reaches Pyramyd Air the beginning of March. I don’t know how many they’ll get, but one look at that custom skeleton stock suggests these will be in short supply. I’m sorry I led you astray with my prediction.

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