Using airsoft guns to teach shooting

by B.B. Pelletier

Before we move on to today’s guest blog, I have 2 announcements. First, Paul Capello has a new Airgun Reporter video posted. It’s about the Gamo CFX, which has been a very popular rifle. Also, a new article has been posted. It’s about the winning entry in the Physics & Astronomy section of the 2008 California Science & Engineering Fair. This was conducted by two eighth-grade students, and it’ll be of interest to all airgunners!

Guest blogger
Joe B. on Maui took some time to teach his friends about his love of airgunning. Passion is what drives most of us to shoot airguns…and it shows when we share it with others.

If you’d like to write a post for this blog, please email me at blogger@pyramydair.com.

Bloggers must be proficient in the simple html that Blogger software uses, know how to take clear photos and size them for the internet (if their post requires them), and they must use proper English. We will edit each submission, but we won’t work on any submission that contains gross misspellings and/or grammatical errors.

Using airsoft guns to teach shooting
by Joe B. on Maui

I recently got around to teaching an airsoft program to my wife’s unconditional love class. (Basically, unconditional loving means that you have no enemies, and that, in a society dedicated to saying NO, you strive to say YES as often as you can, both to yourself and to others.) So, love and guns…strange combination, eh? It worked, and the participants (ages 16-68) had a great time.

I taught airsoft while my co-instructor taught archery. When we first asked who would be interested, almost every hand went up for the archery but only a few for the airsoft pistol shooting. Most had been poisoned against guns by the press. By the time the class rolled around, I had the same number of students (14) as the archery class.

An informal backstop
My shooting set-up was the parking area outside our garage. I hung a sheet backed up by an old blanket from a 12′ 2×8 set on two folding ladders. From this I hung 5 sticky targets. I set up two shooting lines, the first at 10′ and the second at 20, with a folding table set at the 20′ line to hold the pistols and for reloading. I had 8 shooters in the first group and 6 in the second. The first group shot for an hour and then switched with the archers. I communicated with the archery teacher by cell phone, as they were some distance away, in a lower meadow. This way we knew how each group was going and when to switch groups.


Barbara engages targets from the 20′ line with a Beretta 92F-style springer.

If I’d had it to do over, I’d have supplied the same airsoft make and model to everyone, as it was hard work watching the line for safety, showing each person how a different pistol worked and how to reload it. To my embarrassment, several of my spring guns malfunctioned from lack of lubrication and from sitting around unused for months (even though I tried out each gun right before the class). Due to a design flaw, a new UHC 937 springer revolver broke, refusing to hold full-cock position and had to be retired prematurely. Because I’d spent the past two years buying new airsoft toys, there were still enough guns for everyone.

Safety
I began with a basic safety talk, condensing 10 rules of safe gun handling into two: never point the muzzle at anything but a safe target and the only reliable safety was between their ears. Everyone wore eye protection. Because this was airsoft and because the shooting area was fronted by trees, nearby neighbors were totally unaware that a gun handling class was happening within 75′ of them. Also, because this was airsoft and because I was busy on so many fronts, I let some safety violations go that I couldn’t have if we’d been shooting BB/pellet guns or firearms. A few people on the line swept their muzzles past other shooters when reloading, and not everyone remembered to keep their fingers off the trigger until they were on target. Fortunately, I was helped out in each group by at least one other person with military and/or NRA instructor experience.


The business end of a WE 1911A1 gas blowback pistol. The magazine has been removed. It holds propellant, so the gun is safe in this condition to point at the camera.

My archery co-instructor limited her shooters to three at a time so she could keep a more careful eye on them. I would have similarly cut my shooters down to 1 or 2, had I been instructing with firearms or anything similarly lethal. But I couldn’t have taught shooting in my densely packed neighborhood using loud firearms!

Building self-confidence
You should have seen their faces! Pure joy once they started shooting. From the beginning, I’d strived to keep talk to a minimum and to get them shooting as quickly as possible. This worked out great. The women especially got into the shooting. Not only did they surprise me by how accurately they shot, but some also said things like, “Make my day, perp!” and “You talkin’ to ME?” Their self-confidence was quickly building.


Dearborn and Ted reload while Malia confronts her sticky target perp with a Crosman CO2 pistol. In the rear, Susan plays the airsoft equivalent of air guitar! She’s either standing at the ready or her finger has a very stiff recoil.

The most fun was had with an inexpensive, clear battery-operated machine gun and with an AEG Thompson submachine gun. I placed several soft drink cans on the ground in front of the backdrop, and the shooters were absolutely delighted rolling the cans around (the more powerful Thompson tore holes through the soft cans and made them jump dramatically).

Breakthroughs on several fronts
People who were initially frightened of guns were talking about buying their own airsoft guns, BB/pellet guns and/or even real firearms. They were pro-gun and quite excited about shooting. Except for one accidental let-off, which thankfully went harmlessly into the trees at the side of the range, no one got shot with a plastic BB. Although two shooters were hit by ricochets, the BBs were not traveling fast enough to do anything more than startle them. It was a positive experience for all 14 shooters, except…

…due to the nature of the sensitivity required by an unconditional loving class, three women burst into tears during the discussion group following and summing up the archery/airsoft programs. Each remembered a time when they felt like they had totally failed to please their fathers when being shown how to shoot. The fathers had lacked confidence in themselves and had blown it by attempting to use a gun with too much recoil or had lost their tempers at their daughters’ nervousness. It took several hours of holding and reassurance to get them calm and happy again. This is not something you’d normally associate with a shooting session, and so readers are cautioned not to try this at home unless they’ve had sensitivity training! As it turned out, an idea that I’d been toying with for months worked beautifully when put into action.

37 thoughts on “Using airsoft guns to teach shooting


  1. Well done, Joe.

    It was quite brave to wade into such potentially hostile waters.

    Some of my best experiences have been teaching cycling skills for my club and bike repair to inner city kids (http://www.bikesnotbombs.org/EarnABike). Sharing something you love is almost always a great opportunity and experience.

    I am a convert to guns. I was not anti-gun just pretty much neutral. No any more. So much emphasis is put on the illegal use misuse that the rest of the sport, activity and actual responsible use of guns is unknown to so many people.

    Thanks for taking the time and making the effort. It is people like you that help all sport progress.

    Cheers,

    Bruce


  2. Great post Joe and great work. You did a wonderful job of introducing shooting to people who would otherwise not have been exposed to it. One thing about airsoft that I think gets overlooked is the fact that you can shoot them safely in more places than you can with even an air gun.

    You have experience with airsoft and I don’t. What are some accurate guns that you recommend?

    Al in CT


  3. Very good post Joe.
    I got my girlfriend into shooting with an airsoft. She watched me for a while, then tried it for herself. I told her how to shoot it, and in no time she was better than me.
    She did have a problem with being right handed and left eye dominant. She decided that a laser would be the ticket….and she wanted more accuracy, so it was off to Wally World again.
    Now she has a CO2 BB pistol with a laser sight.
    Had to improvise a different backstop though. The new pistol was too rough on what I had set up for the airsoft.
    She likes the fun factor, but has shied away from shooting my Talons. She knows that they are serious killing machines and not suitable for shooting in the living room.

    twotalon


  4. cowboy dad here…off topic.
    Two items really, the first a question, the second a comment.
    I’ve tried the search engine and can’t really come up with an answer.
    Is there a proper method/material for the upcare of wooden stocks, and as well blued barrels. Specifically I’m thinking about ‘sweat’…does the salt ones persperation affect the bluing on a breakbarrel where you are constantly grabbing the same part of the barrel when cocking.

    As well a comment. I remember a while back you did a piece on the mindset of target shooting.
    Interesting…this past week I had a very stressful week and I am truly amazed how difficult it has been to shoot consistently well.



  5. Cowboy dad,

    You won’t find a blog on wood care because I have a sawdust thumb! But I bet we have some real craftsmen reading this blog. We need them to come forward and share their experiences.

    On blued steel, bluing, or the black oxide of today, is controlled rust. Anything that can rust steel can eventually cut through the thin layer of color and start a chemical reaction. The worst are things with salt in them. Blood is the absolute worst, with sweat being fairly bad.

    There is a wonderful cold blue product that I will blog for you one day soon. Anyone can use it and the results are supposed to be as good as a hot blue.

    B.B.


  6. As odd as it seems I got interested in shooting through short wave radio. I live in an area that has a lot of commercial AM radio towers and one very close FM station. They destroy most reception in the area. I wanted to get back into SW listening and my radio wasn’t cutting it. Cabella’s had the best price on the radio I wanted. They sent me a catalog and while perusing it I started looking at the air rifles.

    I had no idea there was anything like adult airguns. I was intrigued and wound up ordering a Gamo Shadow 1000 from PA. I was a hopeless shot but hooked. My best friend had an older springer and enough room to shoot it so we started shooting together while our wives enjoyed margaritas. (None for us until the guns were put away.) It was a win-win.

    What has kept my interest is that there is always more to learn. I am still a rank amateur and have a lot to absorb but enjoy the experience almost as much as shooting.

    I was (am) a bit burned out on cycling and while not as aerobic, shooting gives me something to train for. I think the steep learning curve I experienced in bike racing (not being very good for a long time) has helped me adjust in shooting. I don’t expect to be great at it and don’t expect too much of the equipment. I am enjoying the experience of gaining and working on new skills. As a guy in my 40s it’s something that I haven’t had to do for a while except for work related tasks.

    Sorry to be so long winded.

    Bruce



  7. Joe

    Great job, your writing skills are easy to follow, your story fun, and hopeful for the sport..
    “Unconditional Love” is the real goal for us all, if we’re half smart…

    Learning that people have different “points of view” because they have different experiences that influence that point of view, is the first step..

    It may seem strange from where we stand, because we are exposed to a different “point of view” and didn’t have the experiences the other person did…

    My point is, allow people their learning, and yourself your own…don’t get caught up in the ego of controlling how others live and learn their lessons….

    How’s that for “Airy Fairy” on a gun blog…My wife is a “life” coach and teaches emotional healing that happens as you have seen, mostly by unthinking fathers, letting out their own emotions on little kids, who can’t understand where they come from…
    Think about it the next time you need to let off steam…stay away from other people especially kids, until it passes…and it will…

    Again Joe, good job.

    Wayne


  8. That’s nice to see the eighth graders working on airguns and winning science competitions too. I think the reason that their velocity did not increase in a linear fashion with increase in pressure was because of air resistance.

    Joe, well-done. I was curious about the unconditional love program. What sorts of people tend to sign up? It looks like you had both genders of middle age.

    In response to a discussion some time ago, I think one of the great values of airsoft is in introducing people to the shooting sports. Without airsoft, I would never have gotten off the ground. I never imagined owning the 1000 fps Quest in the local store let alone a firearm. It was only with much deliberation that I decided that the 300 fps airsoft sniper rifle would be worth a try. And when I got it, the first shot I fired (by way of a test) was into the cardboard box. That was almost exactly one year ago.

    Apart from safety, airsoft did a surprising amount for my marksmanship. I learned the virtues of the artillery hold on my airsoft spring rifle. In fact, just about all the fundamentals of my shooting including breath control, position, and the way I develop my sight picture were formed on my airsoft guns. Now I have so many guns that are more accurate than my airsoft collection that I haven’t found a reason to shoot them recently, but they laid the foundation.

    I read in a gun magazine that, contrary to stereotype, women are naturally better shots than men because of their superior “small muscle control.” I don’t know if there’s anything to this.

    By the way, Joe, it’s interesting to hear that you’re on Maui. I grew up in Honolulu and go back to see my parents twice a year.

    Matt61


  9. B.B., Sam, and anonymous,

    Thanks for your comments about the 1911. I got it done, and it proved rather anti-climactic; the gun gave up the ghost pretty easily. I went home and, at the right step, gave a little yank as the S&W techs said and the recoil spring popped right off. With that the guide rod came out with no problem. It is a full-length rod, so it needed the spring off to come free. How exciting! I think we can add a new class of gun owners to the existing list. There are those who shoot only for accuracy; those to who shoot their guns into a wall to chronograph them. And there are those who like to clean them and look down the shiny bores like me. Heh heh.

    Matt61


  10. B.B. & All

    I just got the field targets in from "After Hours Target co." a dozen super well made targets. I can't see how Dick can machine the parts, assemble and paint them for only about $75 for a complete kit with lines and stakes, all heavy duty…It truly must be his hobby business…it seems like the quality parts alone would cost that much….

    I highly recommend Dick for anyone wanting very high quality field targets…
    It will be interesting to see how the $20 Gamo targets compare, when I get the 16 from PA, later this week…

    With shooting at them twice from the closer path and the longer path, 28 should be enough right? A 56 shot contest is about right, isn't it?

    B.B.
    I lent my camera to a member, so we haven't done the pictures yet, he's back from his hike now, and I should be able to send them off later today or tonight, I'll try to get a lot of different angles to give the best perspective of the land choices…Thanks again for your help, I know your busy…

    With all your help, your earning equity, if you want it. Hey it's not that far from Ohio, I was going to come there, for the class…thanks again,

    Wayne,
    Ashland Air Rifle Range


  11. WAYNE,

    DICK OTTEN’S TARGETS ARE THE BEST I’VE SEEN. THEY REPRESENT THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF ENGINEERING IN THE BUSINESS. YOU WILL HAVE FEWER PROBLEMS AND MORE SATISFACTION FROM THEM THAN ANY OTHER TARGET

    Wow! I just looked up and saw the caps key was on. Too much to erase, so I’m leaving it.

    Here is what you need now – a base for each target that can be moved around, but is heavy enough that it won’t move when you reset the target.

    I will give you the plans for such a base on Thursday. You’ll need some 2 by 10′s to mount each target to using lag bolts. Those bases will be about 10 inches long, and they will dovetail into the concrete bases I will give you Thursday.

    B.B.


  12. B.B.

    I, of course, haven't seen any to compare, but I know quality parts when I see them…these are amazing workmanship and parts…glad to hear you agree!!!

    I'll wait to see how to mount them, I guess I won't need the super quality 10" tent stakes he bought and supplied with each one…

    I'll go do the photos this afternoon and later this evening, to get different lighting and shadows…

    I'm getting very excited, I'm going to try one of the targets with the stakes, on my make shift range tonight too… Whoopeee!!!
    The real thing…

    Wayne,
    Ashland Air Rifle Range & Rentals


  13. Anonymous,

    I thought you were kind of rude, with the first comment of the day, but I guess your right, not very many of us “touchy feely” ones out there…not too many comments…maybe they’ll come in late today….

    I don’t mind being a “touchy feely” one…but sorry to see there is not more comments today…

    I still say good job Joe….

    Wayne


  14. BB,
    Do you know much about thee beeman RS-1 Synthetic stock .177 cal rifle? I want to know if there is a way to lighten the trigger pull? do you know how the accuracy is? i have shot some good groups with it and i am far from being an expert. Though the 4×32 scope is nice can you reccomend a better scope, one more suitable for hunting purposes?

    CritterController


  15. On the subject of ranges, Clint Fowler, high master shooter, tells me that in the winter, he would practice his 200 hundred yard target shooting by placing a black thumbtack on the wall and dry firing at it from 20 feet. The thumbtack is supposed to correspond to the 10 ring at 200 yards. What a great low-cost way to convert your IZH 61 or any airgun into a 200 yard precision rifle….

    I don’t know if touchy feely is the word for today’s subject. While newcomers don’t have technical knowledge to bring (all relative anyway), their enthusiasm is unsurpassed. Whenever I get a new gun which won’t happen too many more times, unfortunately, I go wild. But I suppose I can turn my attention to accessories like the shooting mat and the .45 ammo that is arriving today. :)

    Matt61


  16. Wayne,

    Sorry I’m a little behind, but I’ve been off the grid for almost a week. I’m glad to hear that your business is moving along. I’d like to throw in my $0.02.

    1 – I’d pay $6 to play 18 holes of miniature golf, I’d love to have a place where I could pay $10-$20 or so to shoot an FT course. Will you have a la carte pricing in addition to memberships?

    2 – My kids used to go to an indoor climbing place a lot. They kept cards on anyone who came that showed their level of training and safety certifications.

    3 – Sounds like you have a really good “pro shop”. Modelling your busuness after a golf course might not be a bad idea.

    Randy in VA


  17. Randy,

    Thanks for the feed back…I'm not sure how we will work "a la carte" customers…the LLC membership is also about keeping the liability insurance costs down..maybe members can bring guests on a family membership or something…keep the ideas coming..how can it work people?

    I love the idea of cards on the members….You have to pass a safety test to become a member…I love it..

    Yes, how would the members golf course handle "drop ins" or do they?

    Wayne,
    Ashland Air Rifle Range & Rentals


  18. Wayne, yes, rude, and right! All day, and only 20 comment just shows that this is dull compared to airguns that shoot metal, not plastic. And 5 of the comments were just to humor the newbie blogger. bb did not erase the comment cause he is a righteous dude.


  19. CritterController,

    I have not tested the RS-1.

    For a better scope, look at something in the Leapers line that fits your budget.

    As far as lightening the trigger pull, I looked on Charlie Da Tuna’s website, but the GRT-III doesn’t have the RS-1 listed as one of the triggers it fits. So I’ll have to say no, there isn’t an easy fix for the trigger.

    However, the trigger does appear to be like the Gamo trigger and it may get a lot better with use. About 4,000 shots may be required for you to notice a difference.

    B.B.



  20. thank you bb, ive put about 1500 shots through it and i do own a gamo that did get better with use. maybe a good break in is what it needs. and i’ll be lookin for a leapers scope.

    crittercontroller


  21. crittercontroller,

    I’ve got 3 of the RS1… one in .22cal. I like them for the money… the .177 crony at 956 fps with hobby 7.0 and 787fps with kodiak 10.6….they have been very accurate…one of them has a little twist at the end of the shot..maybe from a rough spring end…so it’s a little harder to get as good of groups as the other two.. the .22 cal got 806fps with hobby 11.9 and 671fps with JBS exact 15.8

    Try the 3-9x40AO…for a low budget one and the 4-16x50AO next or the 6-24x50AO if you can..be sure to get AO on which ever one…the centerpoint line is made by Leapers as well..

    The 3-9x40AO has actually held up better to the pounding of the springers than the other two..but I need the extra power for field target shooting…

    Wayne


  22. What are some accurate guns that you recommend?

    Al in CT

    My personal experience is that the more expensive airsoft guns are more accurate. I have a WE-brand gas 1911A1 that is quite accurate, as is a recently purchased Thompson AEG (electric) submachine gun. The WE cost $140 and the Thompson was $180.

    BB has done several reviews of airsoft sniper rifles that are relatively inexpensive (unlike the, say, Tokyo Marui $400+ sniper rifles). These I gather are THE most accurate airsoft guns.

    But for fun, you should also consider the battery-operated ones as well. Ones like the Walther P99 Special Ops (about $30) will fire both semi- and full-auto. I also enjoy shooting a miniature Uzi by Cybergun…about $23. Either of these and a small gel target set at around 15′ provide me with a lot of entertainment. They won’t be as accurate as the above-mentioned WE and Thompson, but they are a lot of fun for cheap.

    Hope this helps.

    Joe B.


  23. Some of my best experiences have been teaching cycling skills for my club and bike repair to inner city kids (http://www.bikesnotbombs.org/EarnABike). Sharing something you love is almost always a great opportunity and experience.
    Bruce

    My wife and I lived in Winthrop for 2 years in the mid-70s, and in Sharon in 1999. We arrived in Winthrop right after a Black teen was shot and killed for jumping an MBTA turnstile without paying the fare. The response to this was to douse a white woman with gasoline and torch her. So I was very impressed to see the good works you’re doing with Bikes Not Bombs there in Boston. Is Jamaica Plain still as volatile as it was when we were there?

    –Joe B.


  24. I was curious about the unconditional love program. What sorts of people tend to sign up? It looks like you had both genders of middle age.

    Matt61

    We get more women than men (ratio about 3:1), and more middle-aged people, age-wise. The program is in its second year, and the 28 participants are becoming family. Like family, they have emotional breakdowns due to old old feelings of not being “enough”. There is also lots of playfulness, joy and profoundly deep healing. It’s pretty amazing.

    –Joe B.


  25. Wayne,

    I thought seriously about leaving out touchy feeey references to the airsoft program write-up, but someone (was it you?) in my original blog comment asked about the unconditional love aspect, so I thought it better to leave it in. I might have gotten more comments if I had left it out, but airsoft is a small part of this forum, so I think the number I DID get was probably about right.

    Anyway, thanks for all the support.

    Joe B.


  26. I read in a gun magazine that, contrary to stereotype, women are naturally better shots than men because of their superior “small muscle control.” I don’t know if there’s anything to this.

    Matt61

    I invited my wife to shoot airguns in my office, once upon a time. We shot feathered darts from a pair of Crosman 760 air rifles, at a dartboard target hung on the back of the door maybe 10-15 feet away. Despite her claims to the contrary that guns were MY specialty and not hers, she managed to outshoot me almost every time!

    BTW, if anyone else wants to try this at home, buy the plastic-bodied darts, as I read somewhere that the metal ones will eventually damage your rifling. I found this out the hard way.

    –Joe B.


  27. My wife is a “life” coach and teaches emotional healing that happens as you have seen, mostly by unthinking fathers, letting out their own emotions on little kids, who can’t understand where they come from…
    Think about it the next time you need to let off steam…stay away from other people especially kids, until it passes…and it will…

    Wayne

    I had an interesting experience yesterday at the movies. After the film I was waiting in the lobby for my wife to come out of the bathroom. I noticed two little girls, about 10, with their grandmother. One girl was enthusiastic and all over the place with her happiness and joi de vivre. Then I watched as the grandmother approached her with this angry expression on her face. I couldn’t hear what she was saying, so I moved closer (I felt like I was stalking easily-spooked game). I heard her say, “…how dare you do something that stupid? Don’t you realize that thousands of sick people put their mouths to the same [whatever it was] that you did?” The girl did a passable job of arguing back. I seriously considered butting in and just flat out telling the girl that her grandmother was insane, but my wife appeared at that point and I regained some semblance of sanity myself. Having grown up with an insane mother and knowing how it had affected me made it difficult to release my anger for the next five minutes as we walked back to our car. I realized that the grandmother’s life was unhappy, and that she was jealous of the little girl’s life force and wanted to shut it down. I also realized that, although smaller than adults, children are not the helpless victims we insist on seeing them as. Still….

    –Joe B.


  28. Joe B.

    My wife owned a preschool for about 20 years..

    She was known around town to be the school that would take the kids the other schools wouldn’t because they wouldn’t “behave”…

    With in one week these kids found that they didn’t have to “act out” to get attention or unconditional love… She always found that there was an adult with emotional problems from their parents as well, they were passing on… we do it way too easy and call it making them obey or tough.. You can’t over love a child… you can give them too much stuff or things.. but you can’t read to them too much or hold them too much, or talk WITH (NOT TO) them to much..

    Being a wood worker, I always made little kits of napkin holders and pencil boxes, they could screw together with a small straight cordless screwdriver…

    You can’t believe how much confidence or “I can do it” attitude, is gained by those gifts that were given to parents… the napkin holder sets on the table and reminds the child that they can build things and use tools… the parents say the kids are so proud for years to come… and also learn how great it feels to give something that is used by the family…

    When we say “oh that’s a nice picture” and set it aside instead of putting it up on the wall, with the other treasured ones, we fail big time…

    thanks again for your blog.

    Wayne


  29. Wayne,

    Thank you for boosting my guest blog.

    When we were adopting special needs kids, we always asked for the angriest ones…they were the kids who were still “in there”.

    We learned that “spoiled kids” were not the ones who were given too much but were given things and then had them taken away, either physically or/and emotionally (“You don’t deserve this!” or “You used it wrong so I’m taking it back.”). My dad was a master at this one. He grew up poor and used to give me expensive gifts (a stereo, a Browning O/U shotgun), but then get afraid he’d overdone it (it was always, “don’t tell your mother”) and then tell me how I didn’t deserve it. I believe what you’re saying is the parent giving the kid presents /instead/ of love…another problem I had with my dad. He left the raising of me to my mom –big mistake– because he was afraid he would abuse me like his dad had abused him. Big emotional hole left by my dad’s abdicating his father role. One of the reasons I grew up loving guns is that this was one of the rare ways he allowed connection between us.

    I sent my parents some of my best photographs once. Years later I found them folded in a desk drawer. Our walls at home were plastered with our own kids’ drawings.

    Good going, Wayne, and please tell your wife thanks from me.

    –Joe B.


  30. Joe B.

    Each generation does the best they can with the tools they received as they grew up, (that’s why we need to give the children as many tools as we can ) … we have to cut ourselves slack with whatever place we started in the game…. And even admire the ones who start with so few assets and make the most progress in a lifetime..

    That to me is the biggest reason not to judge others… who knows where that person started the game… and how much progress they have made so far… and how far ahead they may jump in their next move… too much for this soul to keep track of… just do your best, with the cards in your hands…and let other people do the same…

    Your Dad did his best for what he had to work with at the time…You can count on that…

    Wayne


  31. I love that saying, "Do not add to the troubles of others."

    More often than not these days I remember it BEFORE I say something angrily.



  32. I agree with the last comment. It is a wonderful idea. If it is good enough for law enforcers to use for training why not normal people. They can learn so much about shooting guns without the risk of danger compare to real fire arms.


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