Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo.

This report covers:

• Velocity baselining with Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Premier lite average for 5 pumps
• Premier lite average for 10 pumps
• Velocity baselining with Daisy BBs
• Daisy BB average for 5 pumps
• Daisy BB average for 10 pumps
• H&N Baracuda Match pellets with 4.50mm heads
• Gamo round lead ball
• Trigger-pull
• Evaluation so far

Today, we’ll look at the velocity of the Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo. I told you last time that the loading trough is narrow and difficult to access, and I tried to photograph it for you but was unable to get a picture that showed what I’m talking about. Just take my word that this rifle has much less access room than a Daisy 880 or a Crosman 2100.

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Diana RWS 34P breakbarrel air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Diana RWS 34P breakbarrel air rifle
Diana RWS 34P breakbarrel air rifle.

This report covers:

• First up — Crosman Premier lite pellets
• H&N Baracuda Match pellets — 4.53mm head
• The hold
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• Back to Premier lite pellets
• What now?
• Final observation

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of the Diana 34P air rifle I’m testing. While this has been a conventional test for those interested in the Diana 34, it’s also a precursor to the next part of The great pellet comparison test. I needed a baselined powerful pellet rifle to test the accuracy of premium pellets against bargain pellets. When I finish that test, I’ll write a summary of what’s been learned about the differences between premium and bargain pellets.

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Testing a Diana model 23 breakbarrel air rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Diana 23

Diana 23 was a find on Gun Broker. The finish is bad but the gun works well.

This report covers:

• An update
• Today — disassembly

An update
I started this report back in September 2013 — 16 months ago. I’d purchased a Diana model 23 breakbarrel rifle off the Gun Broker auction website for $30. With shipping, it came to $50. We discussed cruising Gun Broker for airgun deals yesterday, and this is one that I got.

This rifle is really a Winchester model 423, which is how Winchester had Diana mark all their air rifles (in the 400-series, with the Diana model number being the last 2 digits). Most Winchester air rifles are .22 caliber, but this one came as a .177, which is more appropriate to its small powerplant.

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Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo
Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo

This report covers:

• What is it?
• The rifle
• Trigger and safety
• What to make of this airgun

Today, we’ll start looking at the Black Ops Junior Sniper air rifle combo. I have to admit, this is a rather radical departure for me. I’m not fond of black rifles of any kind, yet there’s something about this one that draws me in. This rifle is made for kids! At least that’s what the styling, name and box graphics seem to convey.

What is it?
The rifle is a stylistic black rifle (based on the M16 platform). It’s stylistic because no black rifle has a hole in the forearm like this one. And the barrel leaves the upper handguard differently than an M16 barrel. And the sights are different. And so on. But the object is to appeal to those who like the black rifle look, and I think they did that.

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UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

UTG Monopod V-rest and camera adapter
UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter.

This report covers:

• Bipods are very steady
• Sitting higher is easier on the back
• How I use the monopod
• It really works!
• The camera adapter

When I introduced the UTG Monopod v-rest and camera adapter before Christmas, I made some big claims about its stability. Claims like this monopod is steadier than most of the bipods on the market. Today, I’m prepared to back that up with explanations and pictures.

Bipods are very steady
Make no mistake — a bipod used correctly can be very steady — even benchrest steady. The problem is that they’re often not being used correctly, especially by field target shooters, which is what I want to talk about today.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Diana 45 left
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

• Repairs first
• Accuracy test parameters
• Premier lite pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• RWS Superdome pellets
• More pellets?
• How the rifle behaved
• Next

Today, we’ll begin to learn about the accuracy of the Diana 45 we’re testing. This rifle belongs to a friend of mine, and I want you to remember that the ultimate goal of this series is to completely tune this vintage air rifle to remove as much of the vibration as possible. We aren’t looking for greater power. We want smooth operation. What we’re doing today is just baseline testing.

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What makes them last?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Starting with the Beeman R1
• Then came the TX200
• Benjamin 392
• Why do they last?
• Feel
• Power and accuracy
• A great trigger
• Summary

I was overwhelmed by comments and spams yesterday morning. I worked from 7:15 a.m. into 10 a.m., just cleaning out the spam filters and answering questions. So, the accuracy test I’d hoped to conduct had to be postponed until another day. I needed a report that didn’t take a lot of prep time, so I found this one in my book of blog topics.

Starting with the Beeman R1
Why do certain airgun models seem to last forever in the market, while others come and go so fast? Why, for instance, has the Beeman R1 lasted from 1981 until today — a run of 34 years? What makes that airgun so special, while other rifles that were very nice in their own right disappeared so quickly?

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