Air Venturi Power Booster 4500 psi unit: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Air Venturi Power Booster
Air Venturi Power Booster.

This report covers:

  • Higher price
  • Video
  • Early talk
  • What it is
  • Need a shop compressor
  • Can a gun be filled from empty?
  • No electricity
  • The parts
  • Can it fill a tank?
  • Specs
  • Summary

Today we start looking at the new Air Venturi Power Booster 4500 psi unit. I reported seeing a pre-production model of this at the 2017 SHOT Show. That one didn’t have the outer skin on, so this one looks more finished.

Higher price

The anticipated retail price has risen over time. Pyramyd Air looked at the prototypes and made improvements that made operation easier, but did add to the bottom line. It is what it is, so let’s take a look at that right now.

Video

The best way to see how this unit works is to watch the excellent 6-minute video on the Pyramyd Air website . You have to scroll down the page for this video. I can’t show you the kind of detail that is in that video, so if possible I suggest you watch it before reading the rest of this report.

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The Beeman C1 – Part 1 The rifle that created the artillery hold!

by B.B. Pelletier

This is an oldie from 2009 that I’m recycling because I’m still out of town with my family emergency. As you will soon learn, the Beeman C1 is the rifle that gave me the idea for the artillery hold.

 

A history of airguns

Despite the size of this photo, the C1 is a small rifle. The western look was unique in its day. The scope is a 2-7×32 BSA.
I have places in my heart reserved for certain air rifles. The FWB 124 has a spot, as does the Beeman R1. And there’s another place that’s reserved for the Beeman C1. It’s no longer made. In fact, the company that once made it–Webley–has also disappeared from the world stage. But the C1s that are in the world are wonderful air rifles that deserve a look from us.

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FWB 124 air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB 124
This FWB 124 Deluxe is not the exact gun I’m writing about, but it is the same model.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The motivation
  • What did I get?
  • Now what?
  • Why???
  • The lesson
  • History
  • Long stroke piston
  • Summary

I had planned to tear into the Beeman R8 again today, to see whether removing most of the special new grease I put in when I lubed it would improve the velocity, but I’m not at home so I can’t do that. My other plan for today was to begin telling you about another new/old airgun I found at the 2017 Findlay airgun show. That I can do, so here we go. Let’s look at an FWB 124.

The motivation

Before I begin describing the gun I want to tell you why I’m writing about yet another FWB 124. I have already written about so many of them! The last report was titled A shrine built for a Feinwerkbau 124 and ended in February of 2011. It was a 15-part report that probably turned many readers off because it went on too long. I vowed never to write about the 124 again, but that was before this year’s Findlay show.

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Shimming a Diana breech seal

Introduction by B.B. Pelletier

Thanks for all the kind wishes on my eye surgery. It went very well and my exam the next day (yesterday) showed the potential for 20/20 in that eye.

Once again I am running a “Best of BB” because I still could not see the computer screen well enough to write a new report. I saw the doctor yesterday and got the patch off my eye, so hopefully this will be the last time I have to do this.

With all the interest in tuning spring guns I thought you might like to see what effect a new breech seal has on performance. I plan on giving the Beeman R8 a new seal after I get its velocity up higher than it is now. Let’s look at this old report on what a fresh breech seal can do.

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Pellet velocity versus accuracy test: Part 11

by B.B. Pelletier

I’m posting a Best of BB today because I had cataract surgery yesterday and I couldn’t see the computer screen to write. I selected this article from December 30, 2011 because it’s the last of 11 experiments I( did on spring gun accuracy and pellet velocity. We seem to be interested in tuning spring guns, and this is a good one to read. Remember — there are a total of 11 parts. So enjoy!

I see it seems to indicate there will be another part to come at the end of this report, but I never wrote it. This is the last in the series.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9
Part 10

Happy New Year from Tom & Edith!

One nice thing about watching a TV program is that it only takes an hour or less to view. You have no sense of the man-weeks of work that go into a short production on screen. Sometimes, the same thing happens in the world of airgun blogs.

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Beeman R8: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Clean and inspect
  • Little wear
  • Install the Rail Lock mainspring compressor
  • Now what?
  • Tip
  • When to take off the compressor
  • Finish threading the end cap
  • The trigger
  • It’s been modified!
  • Installing the trigger
  • Trigger tip
  • How does it feel?
  • RWS Hobbys
  • RWS Superdomes
  • JSB Exact RS
  • What happened?

Today I finish inspecting and cleaning the Beeman R8. I will then assemble it, lubricate it and test it with the same pellets I used before, so we can compare.

Clean and inspect

As I cleaned all the grease off the parts I inspected each of them. The piston and spring guide have not been altered. The mainspring is straight (test it by rolling on a flat surface) and fits the piston and spring guide reasonably well. There is some tolerance between the spring and both those parts, and if I were doing a top grade tune I would make a new spring guide, plus I would either shim the inside of the piston or find a mainspring that fits it closer. I’m not doing that today.

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Beeman R8: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Rail Lock Compressor R8

The Beeman R8 looks like a baby R1.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Disassembly begins
  • Remove trigger
  • Unscrew end cap
  • Some words about the Rail Lock compressor
  • Grease everywhere!
  • Remove piston
  • Cleanup
  • Best grease
  • Next
  • Summary

Disassembly begins

Today I take the Beeman R8 apart and we see what’s inside. First the barreled action comes out of the stock. When it does I can show you the articulated cocking link and the part that keeps that link under control.

R8 cocking link
Here is the cocking link. It passes through that bridge that keeps it aligned, and the spring on the right keeps the long link away from the stock. It quiets the linkage.

Remove trigger

With the action free, the trigger is removed from the end cap by pushing out two pins that hold it. The safety and safety spring will also come free.

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