HW 35 Luxus: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Freimark
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • JSB Exact pellets, 8.44-grain dome
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • But wait — there’s more!
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger-pull
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll find out what kind of powerplant is in my new HW35 Luxus. Is it really a 5.5 foot-pound gun, as the German Freimark (capitol F in a pentagram) indicates, or is it something different?

Freimark

The Freimark is a legal designation from the German government. Guns that have it must not produce over 7.5 joules of energy at the muzzle. That converts to 5.53 foot-pounds. If they qualify, such guns are legal for persons 18 years and older to purchase and own as airguns. If they produce more than 7.5 joules, they are classified as firearms and are controlled by those laws.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

RWS Diana 45 air rifle
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

  • Cause to reconsider
  • More black tar?
  • What is black tar grease?
  • A quick job
  • Velocity
  • Summary

Today’s report is an unprecedented test. I thought I’d finished the report on the Diana 45 in Part 9, but it still bothered me that I couldn’t get the last bit of vibration out of the gun. I chalked that up to the high number of parts in the rifle’s powerplant. Too many things to make quiet.

Cause to reconsider

Then two things happened that caused me to reconsider. First, while at the Malvern airgun show, I saw and shot a fabulous HW85 that had been tuned by Bryan Enoch. It was stunningly calm. When I talked to him about his tune, Bryan told me that he put a thin coat of black tar grease on the mainspring before he assembled the rifle. That caused me to stop and think — because that tune was perfect.

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Testing the .177 Pelletgage: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Pelletgage
The Pelletgage comes in .177 caliber at present. The holes are in a steel plate. A plastic plate above the gage plate helps guide the pellet head to the gage hole.

This report covers:

  • Introduction to the Pelletgage
  • How it works
  • How can the Pelletgage be used?
  • How accurate is the Pelletgage?
  • There is a technique to measuring
  • Is the Pelletgage necessary?
  • What comes next?
  • Where to get a Pelletgage

Introduction to the Pelletgage

The Pelletgage is a precision tool that lets you measure the pellet head sizes. The device is a metal plate with graduated holes that accept or reject pellet heads. If a hole accepts a head, the pellet falls through and will usually be caught on the skirt that’s wider than the head. The holes range in size from 4.47mm to 4.56mm.

The Pelletgage does not change the size of the pellet. That is not its function. It measures the pellet head size so you can be sure they’re consistent.

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Hatsan BT65 QE: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Hatsan BT65 QE
Hatsan BT65 QE.

This report covers:

  • First group
  • Problem solved
  • A good start
  • Benjamin domed pellets
  • Beeman Kodiak Match pellets
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Back to the JSB pellets
  • What about the silencer?
  • Conclusions

I’ve wanted to get back to this .25-caliber Hatsan BT65 QE for a long time. Today, I’ll tell you what happened. I wasn’t satisfied in part 3 that I was seeing the best accuracy this rifle could produce at 50 yards, even though there were some okay 9-shot groups. This big PCP has the reputation for shooting better than it did, and I wanted to see that; so I removed all the silencer parts and went back to the range.

Over the years, I’ve had problems with airgun silencers — starting with a Daystate Mirage in the late 1990s that just didn’t hold up at 50 yards. When its silencer was removed, that rifle suddenly tightened up and shot like it was supposed to; and that’s what made me aware that airgun silencers are tricky things. When they work, they do so beautifully, and you never know they’re there. But if anything touches the pellet before it leaves the muzzle, all accuracy is destroyed.

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Walther Terrus Air Rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • First up — JSB Exact RS pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Vibration
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger-pull
  • Chronograph problem solved?
  • What’s inside?
  • Evaluation so far

Today, we’ll see how fast the .22-caliber Walther Terrus breakbarrel air rifle shoots. We’ll also learn some other things about the state of this Terrus’ tune as it comes from the box. There’s a lot of interest in the Terrus, both because of the price and also because it comes from Walther.

First up — JSB Exact RS pellets

The first pellets I tested were the 13.43-grain JSB Exact RS domed pellets. They fit the bore loosely and averaged 649 f.p.s. for 10 shots, with a range from 646 to 658. The spread was 12 f.p.s. At the average velocity, it generates 12.55 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle.

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The Benjamin Bulldog big bore: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Benjamin Bulldog
Benjamin’s new Bulldog bullpup big bore air rifle is a .357-caliber 5-shot repeater.

This report covers:

  • Tin Starr Bullets
  • Tin Starr 101-grain SWC
  • Air management
  • Tin Starr 108-grain truncated cone
  • Air Venturi round ball
  • Eun Jin 9mm domed pellets
  • Tin Starr 128-grain round nose
  • Back to the Tin Starr 101-grain SWC
  • Velocity
  • More to come

Thanks for being so patient on this report. I last looked at the Benjamin Bulldog .357 big bore air rifle on April 2. April was a very busy month for me and I had to put all trips to the range on hold. But I’m back in the saddle now, and there will be more tests of this Bulldog, as well as a couple accuracy tests of the Hatsan BT-65, which was also left hanging.

Tin Starr Bullets

The good news is that, while I was busy, Johnny Hill of Tin Starr Bullets made me a bunch of new bullets. I like his bullets because they’re pure lead and very soft. That seems to make a difference when it comes to accuracy. Last time, I tried his bullets that were sized 0.356, but today I’ll show you what they do at 0.357 inches. The difference is dramatic!

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HW 35 Luxus: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • The HW35
  • Barrel lock
  • Sights
  • Weight and length
  • Me and the HW35

I’m going to start this report by eating some crow. Or is it humble pie? I never remember. I want to say at the start of this report that reader Dom was right, and I was wrong about my new HW35 Luxus. Dom told me that his 35 had a Freimark (a capitol F inside a pentagram — the German symbol for airguns developing less than 7.5 joules) and he wondered if mine did, as well. If it did that might be why it shoots so smooth. I told him my gun didn’t have one.

Except it does. A great big one!

You see, I got 2 air rifles at the Malvern show — this HW35 and a BSF S54. When I looked at the gun for Dom I looked at the S54 instead of the 35.

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