Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • Quiet
  • A couple things
  • High Power
  • Baracuda Match 4.50mm
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Low power
  • Medium power setting 4
  • What to make of this?
  • Trigger pull
  • Accuracy
  • Evaluation

We’re back with the Hatsan Gladius .177 long today for the velocity test. Hatsan advertises that this rifle gives up to 90 shots per fill. You may get that many, but not on full power. This is a hunting rifle and you want hunting rifle accuracy. For me that means keeping all your shots inside an inch which is the size of the kill zone on the smaller game the Gladius is designed to take. Now, when you throw distance into the equation things get confused very fast, so my way to simplify things is to say that 50 yards is the distance at which I would like to see one-inch groups.

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Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

Crosman 101

Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic.

This report covers:

  • Different test
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Peep sight adjustment
  • Back to Premiers
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match — 5.53mm head
  • Eley Wasps
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Overall evaluation

Today we look at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Crosman 101 multi-pump pneumatic. Although I have owned it for many years, it isn’t an airgun I shoot a lot, so this will be as interesting to me as it is to you.

Different test

Because the rifle is so difficult to both cock and load, I shot 5-shot groups today instead of the usual 10. All shooting was done off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. I did find the tiny peep hole a bit challenging to use with my recovering eye, but it was possible. I had the target attached to the backstiop on its side, so all the bulls appear sideways. Let’s see how the rifle did.

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Boxes — keep ‘em?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Love my job
  • Boxes everywhere
  • Good or bad?
  • Time adds value
  • Designing a box
  • Keep or not?

Love my job

I may have mentioned this before — I love my job! I get to handle and shoot airguns every day of my life, and I get to tell others about it. What’s not to like? Well, there may be one thing. Boxes.

My house is taken over by boxes. There isn’t a room in the house that doesn’t have at least one gun and one gun box. What’s that? You think my bathrooms are free? Think again. I bet I have the only guest bathroom in the world with an 1822 French horse pistol resting in the vanity drawer!

1822 French pistol
1822 French pistol. Guest bathroom, left side of vanity, second drawer down.

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Hatsan Gladius .177 long: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Gladius
Hatsan Gladius Long.

This report covers:

  • The rifle
  • Synthetic and metal
  • Repeater
  • Magazines
  • 200 bar
  • Trigger
  • Ergonomics
  • Rails
  • Compressed air
  • Impressions so far

Today I start looking at the Hatsan Gladius .177 long. This is a large, powerful precharged pneumatic (PCP) hunting rifle that has a very high rating from satisfied customers. I’m testing the rifle in .177 caliber, but it also comes in .22 and .25. There is also a short Gladius in all three calibers that retails for $50 less than the long ones.

The rifle

The long Gladius is large, weighing in at 10.6 lbs. without a scope. The Gladius is a bullpup design that doesn’t take full advantage of the bullpup style — at least in the long version. I asked for the long rifle so I could test the maximum power (in the selected caliber) and shot count. With a PCP the length of the barrel determines the power to a large extent. Now, you may argue that a powerful air rifle like the Gladius should be tested in the larger calibers that can generate the maximum energy, but others want to see the fastest velocity with the flattest trajectory. Whichever way I go, some will be dissatisfied. And, no, I’m not planning to test this rifle in the other calibers. I’ll let the published numbers speak for themselves. The last big Hatsan PCP I tested was a BT65 QE rifle in .25 caliber. A test of a .177 Hatsan PCP was past due.

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Webley Mark II Service: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service
Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Eley Wasps
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superpoints
  • What to do?
  • Barrel removal
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Other neat things

Before I begin today’s report, here is another reminder about the Texas Airgun Show, on Saturday, August 27 at the Arlington Sportsman Club. Find information here. And don’t forget the Pyramyd Air Cup, that’s held September 9-12 at the Tusco Rifle Club in Dennison, Ohio. I will be at both events, so come out and say hello. Now, let’s take a second look at the Webley Mark II Service air rifle.

There was a lot of interest in this rifle in the first part of the report. We will look at velocity today, and I’ll also show you things several readers asked about. This should be an interesting report, so grab your coffee and let’s get started.

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The Daisy 853: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy 853
Daisy Avanti 853.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Reader ideas
  • Re-oiling the pump head
  • Old stock screws caused trouble
  • Break the spacer
  • Disassemble the action
  • Assembly
  • What’s next?

Before we begin I want to remind all of you about the Pyramyd Air Cup. It’s just about three months away! I plan to be there this year, so come out and say, “Hi” if you can.

I also want to remind you about the Texas Airgun Show that’s even closer. The tables are almost filled and most of the major manufaturers and importers will be there. Plus, American Airgunner will be there all day.

Yes, sports fans, we’re back with the Daisy 853 today. Here’s what I learned from all of you after the last report. I learned that many of you consider the 853 to be tricky to work on, as I reported. It’s not because of complexity; it’s because of the method of construction. This rifle is held together by its parts in ways that make assembly a challenge. I suppose you do get better at it after working on many guns, but there are a lot of little tricks I don’t yet know, so I find it challenging.

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Welcome, fellow Jedi!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Back in the day
  • Parallax
  • Twist rate and rifling styles
  • Velocity versus accuracy
  • Oh, how far we have come!

I was going to show you a brand new spotting scope today, but something came up that I want to address. I don’t always respond to your comments these days — there are simply too many of them for me to cover. But I at least scan all of them and I read many of them.

Yesterday it dawned on me as I was reading the comments – many of you are ready to take your test to become full-fledged Jedi knights! A few may even go on to become Jedi masters. Well done, my enthusiastic Padawan learners!

Whenever I write about a technical subject I cringe, thinking of all the questions it will bring. That used to be bad, because I had to answer each any every question myself. But that isn’t the case anymore. I have been following conversations between Bulldawg76, GunFun1 and ChrisUSA and I am amazed at the level of expertise being displayed. I remember when each of them first started commenting on the blog, and they don’t seem like the same people anymore.

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