Webley Service Mark II: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark II Service rifle
Webley Mark II Service rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

Today’s report is a follow-on to a 5-part series I did on the Webley Mark II Service rifle. Today’s post is by reader RidgeRunner, who now owns the rifle. He tells us about the maintenance he did on the rifle.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me.

And now, take it away, RidgeRunner.

This report covers:

  • A Little History
  • Something Funny Going On
  • We’re Going In
  • Doodad
  • Onward Through The Fog
  • Back Together
  • What’s Next?

A little history

Those of you who have been hanging around for a while may vaguely recall BB doing a blog about one of these air rifles. What some may not know is my loving wife contacted BB and conspired with him to have that very air rifle be my Christmas present last year. Needless to say I was quite surprised — shocked is more like it. This lovely old lady is now a permanent resident at RidgeRunner’s Home For Wayward Airguns. read more


The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Do I plan my blogs?
  • So — why this one?
  • The sight
  • P1 damaged
  • How does it look?
  • Impressions
  • Summary

It’s been a long time since we looked at this pistol. Part 9 was published nearly a year ago. And the series was started on the first of November, 2017. So, let me bring you up to speed.

As I was packing up to leave the 2017 Texas Airgun Show, a gentleman approached me for a trade. We traded and I ended up with a Beeman P1 pistol. I already owned a P1 that I had purchased many years before, but this one was nice and it came with everything I needed to rebuild the powerplant — if that was required. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Hold?
  • Stock screw torque
  • Scope zero
  • Crux seated deep
  • Crux seated flush
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • 25 yards
  • DUH!
  • Last pellet
  • Where are we?
  • What’s next?
  • Summary

Today will be the start of the Sig ASP20 accuracy test, but it will be different than all the other rifles I have tested. I usually mount a scope and begin testing at 10 meters — looking for one or more pellets that are accurate for tests at longer ranges. I’m not doing that today. Before I get into the report, though, I want to address some readers’ concerns.

Hold?

Someone asked me to check the sensitivity of the rifle to how it’s held. But I already reported on that back in August. I discovered back then that this rifle likes to rest directly on the sandbag and not be held by the artillery hold. I will test the artillery hold in later installments, but it’s pretty much a given that this rifle likes to be rested right on the bag. read more


Sig Sauer P320 M17 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig M17 pellet pistol
Sig Sauer P320 M17 pellet pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Correction
  • Sig wonders why we want to disassemble the gun
  • The test
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Rifled barrel
  • Magazine gas loss
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Crux Ballistic Alloy
  • Blowback
  • Trigger pull
  • Daisy BBs
  • Smart Shot a no go
  • Beeman Perfect Rounds
  • Shot count
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the Sig P320 M17 pellet pistol. But there will be more to this test than just three pellets. Because readers wondered if it could also shoot BBs and I learned that it can, I will test them, as well. As long as I’m testing BBs, I will test lead balls of differing sizes, because when we get to the accuracy test I’ll want to test them as well.

Correction

I told you in the last part that the magazine cap has to be removed to insert a CO2 cartridge. That was incorrect. Just remove the mag from the gun and insert the cartridge by following the directions in the manual. Leave the cap alone. read more


An American Zimmerstutzen: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

American Zimmerstutzen
What in the world is this?

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The puzzle
  • Gold?
  • On to the next supposition
  • Few gun parts
  • Discussion
  • Busy box
  • Summary

The puzzle

Reader August figured out the main piece of the puzzle, when he discovered that the inscription on the large medallion is from the Trenton Watch Company. Actually, that was all you needed to know to know that none of the medallions on this gun are gold. No tests are needed, because in the watch industry, the words “Warranted 10 years” are industry code for heavy gold electroplate. Another term is gold-filled. They all mean electroplated. Electroplate means plated with gold — not solid gold. Any pawnshop owner or worker in the world should know that. Therefore, the pawn shop that listed this on Gun Broker and used the tag as one of their pictures, was clearly misleading potential buyers. New reader Mudflap was the first to catch that. read more


Johnson Indoor Target Gun: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Johnson Indoor Target Gun
The Johnson Indoor Target Gun is a catapult BB gun that was made in the late 1940s for youth target practice.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • First shot
  • Second shot
  • Adjusted down again
  • Rubber band broke
  • Now for a group
  • Proof of the pudding
  • Summary

Well, all the work we did was to get to this point. Today I shoot the Johnson Indoor Target Gun for accuracy.

The test

I shot at a target about 10 feet away. I was seated and used the UTG Monopod as a rest.

Since these BBs are only moving 126-129 f.p.s., or so, I used an aluminum foil target like the one I made for the Sharpshooter catapult gun test. We know slow-moving balls will penetrate aluminum foil readily. The target was backed by a cardboard box that stopped every BB, and then sent them back at me. More work is required on the backstop to catch the BBs successfully. read more


How the Price-Point PCP (PPP) has changed the face of the airgun world

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex’s Gauntlet was the first PPP to be announced, but several others beat it to the marketplace.

This report covers:

  • Gauntlet dropped!
  • For Hank
  • For the manufacturers
  • What is a PPP?
  • Cost
  • Required features
  • Nice features to have
  • Caliber
  • ALL BOATS ARE FLOATED!
  • Compressors
  • Other PCPs
  • Sig
  • AirForce Airguns
  • On and on
  • Summary

Gauntlet dropped!

When Umarex announced the new Gauntlet air rifle the savvy airgunning world was stunned. A precharged pneumatic (PCP) that was a repeater, was shrouded with an active silencer, had an adjustable trigger and stock, was accurate and came with a regulator — all for less than $300. They named it appropriately, because it was a huge gauntlet to drop on the airgun community. I’m sure this is exactly what Umarex had in mind, though the particulars of how it has and still is unfolding I’m sure have been as much of a surprise to them as they have been to others. read more