The TexanSS: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

TexanSS
TexanSS big bore air rifle from AirForce.

Part 1
Part 2

  • Different
  • The challenge
  • Start — 210-grain SWC
  • 250-grain hollowpoint
  • Heavier bullets
  • Predator “pellet”
  • What I have learned
  • Noice

I finally got out to the range to test the velocity of the AirForce TexanSS. I told reader Aaron that I would report on that as soon as possible and today is the day.

TexanSS through chronograph
It takes a chronograph to test like I did.

Different

Aaron, I discovered that the TexanSS powerplant behaves differently than the .45 Texan I told you about. Today I will reveal what I have discovered thus far.

The challenge

The TexanSS is a .45 caliber big bore air rifle that has a bullet tuner on the left side of the gun. Some folks might be tempted to call it a power adjuster, because that is what it does, but it’s not there for power. It’s there to tune the rifle for each different bullet you shoot. That gets you the best velocity and accuracy, plus you don’t waste any air. You may see that in today’s report. read more


How to sharpen a straight razor: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • A gift
  • The razor
  • Best shave
  • The importance of the strop
  • Razor’s edge is fragile
  • The strop
  • Buy quality
  • How this relates

I said at the end of Part 6 back in November of last year that this series had ended. Well, things transpired to change that, as you will learn today. So sit back, because there is more to tell.

A gift

At this year’s SHOT Show I walked into the Pyramyd Air booth one afternoon and was handed a business card. On the back was a note telling me to come to a certain booth — there was a fine Swedish razor awaiting me. Reader Jim met me in that booth the next morning and presented me with a really nice old Swedish straight razor. He told me he used to shave with one when he was in college (he’s near my age) and he had bought several over the years. He had given most of them away, but stumbled across this one while the series was running, and he thought of giving it to me at this year’s SHOT. read more


FLZ Luftpistole, version 2: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FLZ pistol
The FLZ version 2 pistol was made in Germany from 1938 to 1940.

A history of airguns

  • Uncommon
  • Description
  • Stock
  • Marks
  • Looks like a rifle

Today we start looking at an air pistol that’s uncommon in the U.S., and indeed, around the world — the FLZ Luftpistole version 2. FLZ stands for Fritz Langenhan of Zella Mehlis, Germany. We have looked at one other FLZ airgun on this blog in the past — the Millita that now resides in RidgeRunner’s Home For Wayward Airguns.

Uncommon

I don’t think the FLZ air pistol is rare, but the first version that has a rounded grip was made from 1926/7 to 1940, according to The Encyclopedia of Spring Air Pistols, by John Griffiths. Version 2 that I have was introduced in 1937 and lasted until 1940. The nation of Germany was preparing for war in the late 1930s, and commercial production was curtailed, so I think the second version of the gun must be less common. That doesn’t make it more valuable — just harder to find. read more


Using air pistols for defense training

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

  • Why the pseudonym?
  • Defense shooting
  • The ideal airgun
  • The training
  • Action targets
  • Holster?
  • Evolution
  • Suggestions

Why the pseudonym?

Some new readers may wonder why I still write as B.B. Pelletier, even though I put my real name above. Well, it goes back to the 1990s, when I was writing The Airgun Letter. My style of writing that you all feel comfortable with today was unheard of in 1994, when the newsletter started. At that time the world of airguns was full of cliques that tried to exclude others, or if they couldn’t keep them out they tried to ridicule and discourage them. The internet just gave them a larger overpass to spraypaint. Edith and I didn’t allow that on our Airgun Letter Forum, and it drove these guys nuts! We were hacked and spammed and everything else that’s bad, even though many of our detractors were also living on our forum! read more


Wind indicator

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This is a guest blog on building and using wind indicators, by reader Hank Vana 2.

If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now, over to you, Hank

Wind indicator
By Hank Vana 2

Wind indicator

The Wind Indicator consists of a wooden post, some stiff wire, a bit of bead-chain, a tie-wrap and a length of flagging tape.

This report covers:

• Wind Indicators
• Range Setup and Wind Indicator Use
• Bending the Wire Arm
• Fitting the Bead Chain
• Putting It Together
• Conclusion

Wind Indicators

There are a number of forces that affect the free flight of a pellet. Forces like drag and gravity are easily compensated for by adjusting the rifle’s sights to agree with the point of impact. Compensating for the wind is not as easy. Because it is so variable in direction, strength and consistency, it is a force that plays havoc with our shooting unless we are constantly aware of it. read more


Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Discussion
  • Summary

The last test of the Crosman 100 was back in December, when I shot a remarkable 5 pellets into 0.145-inches at 10 meters. That engendered the question of whether it was just a lucky group or the rifle was really that accurate. I said at the end of that report that I would return and shoot 10 five-shot groups at 10 meters with the same pellet, so we could see whether that target was a fluke or representative. I waited until my right eye was corrected again, to give the test the best chance for success. So, today is the day! read more


Everything old is new again

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Old man
  • Screech!
  • I can’t believe…
  • Las Vegas
  • For all who want to write
  • Second point
  • What goes around — karma
  • Summary

If I could put a subtitle on this report it would be, “BB, how do you know so much about guns?”

Old man

The answer is simple — I’m old. Oh, not all old people are smart like me. Some of them don’t read, and as a result everything seems new to them, just as it does to younger people. But the ones who do read are always very smart — just like me!

Here is the first example. While researching an article for this blog on the .22 rimfire cartridge I happened onto a forum where the discussion was about why convertible revolvers in .22 Long Rifle and .22 WRM are not accurate with both rounds. One guy wrote that the SAMMI (Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers’ Institute) spec for the bore of a .22 Long Rifle barrel was 0.223-inches and for the .22 WMR it was 0.224 inches. That was followed by a long discussion that went like this. read more