Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Strike Point
Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • The sights
  • RWS Superdome
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • RWS HyperMax
  • Crosman Premier light
  • RWS Hobby
  • Evaluation

Today we test the accuracy of the new Umarex Strike Point multi-pump pistol. This test is the one we have all been waiting to see. The Strike Point is firmly in competition with the  Crosman 1377, and we want to know how it stacks up downrange.

The test

I shot from 10 meters off a sandbag rest. I shot 5 shots per target because this is a multi-pump. If any pellet grouped well, I would shoot another 10 shots with that pellet. I pumped the gun 4 times per shot, because the velocity test indicated that would be okay.

Sig Match Ballistic Alloy

The first pellet I tested was the Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellet. It wasn’t tested in the velocity test, but this pellet has proved remarkably accurate in many airguns and I thought it deserved a test. Five pellets went into a 2.922-inch group. I’m not showing the dime in this photo because it makes no sense. This is a huge group for 10 meters! Also I noticed that 4 of the five pellet holes showed some tipping of the pellet as it passed through the target. read more


Revitalizing a Benjamin 392: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Benjamin 392
Benjamin 392 multi-pump pneumatic.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Crosman Premiers
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavys
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Well?
  • JSB second test
  • Evaluation
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Benjamin 392 that’s been rebuilt. What you are about to see is stunning! This report will blow your minds!

The test

I looked at the results of the Part 2 velocity test and determined that 4 pumps would be a good number for all pellets. Since this is a multi-pump where each shot takes more time, I decided to shoot 5-shot groups, to see whether one pellet is more accurate that the rest. If I found one, I would then shoot 10 shots with that one at a fresh target. That led to an extremely rare occurrence that’s going to surprise most of you. read more


Revitalizing a Benjamin 392: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R9

Part 1

Benjamin 392
Benjamin 392 multi-pump pneumatic.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The rebuild
  • The test
  • Test 1
  • Analysis of test 1
  • Test 2
  • Analysis of test 2
  • Test 3
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Analysis of test 3
  • Next

Today we look at the Benjamin 392 that has been resealed. The first report was done on the gun as it came from the pawn shop. All I did was oil the pump head with ATF Sealant and then test the gun. It’s been a long time since Part 1, so you may want to read it again. In the last test I said this was the fastest 392 I have ever tested.

The rifle responded well to ATF Sealant. I will run those number with today’s test figures for comparison.

The rebuild

I sent the gun to reader Jeff Cloud for a rebuild. He is the guy who rebuilt my Sheridan Blue Streak a couple years ago. read more


Umarex Legends Ace in the Hole pellet revolver: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Legends Ace revolver
Umarex Legends Ace in the Hole revolver.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • RWS Hobby
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • RWS HyperMAX
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Evaluation
  • Next

Things are back on track today and we will look at the accuracy of the Umarex Legends Ace in the Hole revolver. I hope it’s good!

The test

I shot from a sandbag rest at 10 meters. Ten meters is far for an action pistol, but I am trying to establish where the Ace is, in terms of hitting the target.

I wore my reading glasses so the sights would appear sharp. Single action sights work a little differently than any other revolver sights, because the rear sight is a notch in the back of the frame. The sides of this notch slope up toward the notch on both sides and I find myself holding the front sight blade a little higher than I am used to. Once I get the sight picture, though, I can do good work with an SAA. read more


Smell the roses!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Price-Point PCP
  • Silencers
  • Lookalikes
  • More lookalikes
  • $100 PCP
  • More than just guns
  • Hand pumps
  • Compressors
  • Airgun technology
  • Big bores
  • There’s more

Today’s report came to me as I was planning to test the accuracy of the Umarex Legends Ace in the Hole revolver. I have so many tests waiting for my time, but today’s report had to come first.

Gentlemen — we are living in airgunning’s Golden Age. I know I have written that many times, but today I would like to reflect on all the good things that are happening in our world. Let me start with the Price-Point PCP.

Price-Point PCP

When I got into precharged pneumatics in 1995, I was dragged into it kicking and screaming. No PCP rifle cost less than $600 in that day (think $900 today) and the high-pressure hand pump had just been invented. I had to use a 3000 psi aluminum scuba tank that cost an additional $120 and I had to beg the local dive shop to fill it for me. I actually created a release form that I signed and left on file with them to absolve them from all risk of selling air to a non dive-certificated person! That might sound extreme in 2018, but in 1995 that was the way it was done, and plenty of dive shops refused to sell us air. read more


Chinese B3 underlever: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

B3
The B3 underlever from China.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Pre-work baseline
  • RWS Hobby
  • Harsh firing cycle
  • Rifle is breaking in
  • Air Arms Falcon
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • RWS Hobby again
  • Discussion
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today I will test the velocity of the B3 underlever that we cleaned and lubed on Friday. This will be a fantastic learning lesson for all airgunners, because the results are most informative!

Pre-work baseline

If you have been following this report you know I discovered in Part 2 that the rifle wasn’t performing to expectations. In Part 3 I replaced the breech seal and tested the velocity. That gave us a baseline we can use today for a before and after comparison. Let me get to the tests right now.

RWS Hobby

The first pellet to be tested was the RWS Hobby. In Part 3 Hobbys gave an average 617 f.p.s. with a 24 f.p.s. spread. read more


Chinese B3 underlever: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

B3
The B3 underlever from China.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Remove the stock
  • Anti-beartrap
  • The piston and sliding compression chamber
  • Removing the mainspring
  • Removing the anti-beartrap device
  • Compression chamber and piston out
  • Cleaning
  • Assembly
  • The trigger
  • Lubrication
  • Does it work?
  • Next
  • Summary

Today I take the Chinese B3 underlever rifle apart and we see inside. This will be a good one.

Remove the stock

The first step is to remove the stock. That’s two forearm screws and one in the triggerguard. Once out, I could see this rifle is very rusty. It’s so rusty that it will take many hours to clean. I don’t have that kind of time so I’m going to clean only what needs to be cleaned.

B3 action
With the action out of the stock you can see rust everywhere! Notice the flat bar in front of the trigger housing. That’s the anti-beartrap. read more