They have the wrong twist rate!: Part 2

usby Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Been awhile
  • New airgunners
  • A better way
  • Doing what works
  • The point
  • Sharpening straight razors

Been awhile

Part 1 of this report was written way back in the beginning of February. I think the reason it’s taken me so long to get back to it is I titled it wrong. I will discuss that as we go, but first let me define who “they” are. In the words of comedian, Red Green, “They” are everybody who is not us. Now that that’s clear we can continue.

Part 1 was a treatise on twist rates and how they affect accuracy. As many of you are aware, I use this blog to school both new airgunners and also airgun manufacturers — who are often as ignorant of the facts as new airgunners, but cannot or will not admit it. No engineer who has just been hired by an airgun company is going to admit there is something he doesn’t know about guns! Heaven forbid! And neither is any CEO or owner of a company, because in their minds they are in a position of authority and should therefore know!

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Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Stormrider
Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • RWS Superdome
  • Experience pays off
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • The trigger
  • Next — the shocker!
  • Aiming error
  • Magazine
  • Final group
  • Summary

Today we begin looking at the accuracy of the .22-caliber Diana Stormrider PCP. I know that many of you are eagerly awaiting these tests to make an important decision. Let’s jump right in.

The test

I shot using open sights from 25 yards off a rest today for several reasons. First, the Stormrider comes with open sights and, while a scope has to be sighted-in which can take some time to do, a gun’s native sights should be pretty much on all the time. The second reason I trusted the sights is the rifle I’m testing is one Pyramyd Air put through many tests already. Surely they have shaken it down before sending it to me.

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The Diana 27: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
My .22 caliber Diana 27 is actually a Hy Score 807.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Eye report
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Some questions arise
  • RWS Superpoints
  • The artillery hold
  • Summary
  • MP40
  • Second time was the trick

Before I begin, someone asked about Rich Shar. He’s the guy who smoothes the biggest spring guns like the big Gamos and Hatsans. Rich tells me he has not been working on guns for awhile, but he does have a project in the works. He promises to tell me more about it. Now, on to today’s report.

I have decided to take my Diana 27 apart and clean out the old grease, then relubricate it with Almagard 3752 grease, to see what difference it might make. But not today. Today will be a traditional Part 3 accuracy test.

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The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Beeman Kodiaks
  • Eye not up to par
  • RWS Superdome
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • Crosman Premiers
  • 25 yards
  • Summary

The test

Today is our first day of accuracy testing the HW85 and I’m going to do something different. I will start at 10 meters, using the open sights that came on the rifle I’m testing. But I will only shoot 5-shot groups. I’m not interested in the absolute accuracy at 10 meters because this rifle can shoot farther than that. Ten meters is too close to accuracy test a rifle like this and expect any degree of confidence, and today you will see why.

Naturally I’m shooting with the rifle rested on a sandbag. I’m using the artillery hold, because even though the rifle is super smooth, it still recoils forward a lot. I held my off hand forward, under the rear of the cocking slot.

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Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

MP40
Umarex Legends MP40 BB submachinegun.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Other interests
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Semiauto?
  • Umarex Steel BBs
  • Full auto
  • Back to Hornadys
  • How many BBs?
  • Shot count
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the new Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun. I’ve read reviews that say it is surprisingly accurate, so I was hopeful.

Other interests

Besides velocity, you readers had several other things you wanted me to try. I tried a few and will also report those results. Let’s go!

Hornady Black Diamond BBs

First up were Hornady Black Diamond BBs. I loaded just 10 into the magazine, because I wanted to shoot a 10-shot group. The MP40 stops shooting after the last BB is fired, so there is no risk of dry-firing and wasting CO2. The gun already had two mostly fresh cartridges in the mag from the end of the last test, so I went with those until they were exhausted.

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Revisiting the BSA GRT Lightning XL SE: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This is Part 2 of a guest blog from reader Dennis. He sent this to me a month ago, but I got so busy that I forgot about it until he reminded me last week.

This is about the air rifle he really enjoys. If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now over to you, Dennis.

Revisiting the BSA GRT Lightning XL SE: Part 2

By Dennis

BSA GRT Lightning
BSA GRT Lightning XL SE.

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • Mea culpa
  • Process modifications
  • Groups at 20, 30 and 40 yards
  • Trajectory
  • Conclusion

Introduction

In Part 1 I reviewed the BSA GRT Lightning LX SE (.22 caliber), discussed several issues and showed results of several groups shot at 15 yards. I was encouraged to extend the range beyond 15 yards and report back the results. Thus this Part 2.
If you have not yet read Part 1, you can find it via the link above. Feel free to check it out now. I’ll wait here for you.

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The Golden Rule

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The foundation
  • Airgun Breakfast
  • How things developed
  • Next year
  • Undaunted
  • Progress
  • AirForce
  • Time marches on
  • Back to Crosman
  • Challenger PCP
  • Summary

I’m using the history section for a special report today. It’s history, but also very recent. Last Thursday when I started the report on the Diana Stormrider, reader William Schooley asked me the following question.

“Thought this might might be an interesting 3P juniors PCP rifle until you reported the 20 FPE and 26 FPE numbers. Something tells me that this rifle will exceed rule 4.1.7 limit of 600 fps muzzle velocity.

Will someone please explain why there are no sporter class PCP’s on the market that have been submitted for inclusion on the approved rifle list (Rule 4.2.1) at a $200 price point?

When that happens, that will be a PCP rifle a junior can purchase with their own allowance and odd job money and shoot at 3P and 4P matches.

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