Diana Chaser air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Diana Chaser air pistol
The Diana Chaser is a new CO2 pistol.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Qiang Yuan Match pellets
  • Adjusted the sights
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Pellets jamming
  • Trigger pull changed
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • RWS Superdome
  • The magazine
  • Open sights visible?
  • RWS Superdomes through the magazine
  • Discussion
  • Surprise!

Today is accuracy day for the Diana Chaser air pistol. I threw in some extra tests just for fun. This should be interesting, so let’s go!

The test

I shot off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. I used the single shot tray for the first 4 groups, then switched to the magazine for the final group. There were some interesting results that I couldn’t have predicted.

Qiang Yuan Match pellets

I shot the first group with Qiang Yuan Match pellets. No particular reason for that, other than I had them ready. They hit the target low and to the left, but I left the sights where they were and shot all 10 pellets. They landed in a group that measures 1.052-inches between centers. This was larger than I had hoped for the Chaser. read more


Hatsan 135 QE Vortex .30-caliber pellet rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Hatsan 135 30 caliber rifle
Hatsan’s .30 caliber 135 QE Vortex is a large breakbarrel — both in size and caliber.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact 44.75 grain
  • JSB Exact 50.15-grain
  • Predator Polymag
  • Next
  • JSB domes at 25 yards
  • Predator Polymags
  • Polymags with the tips removed
  • Popeye?
  • What’s next?
  • Summary

Time for me to bend the bow of Ulysses and see what it can do. Today I have a slightly different accuracy test for you.

The test

I tested the rifle at both 10 meters and 25 yards. I shot 5-shot groups today because this rifle is just too hard for me to cock. A tired BB is a sloppy BB. All shooting was off a sandbag rest in the normal fashion and I used the artillery hold, both because I knew the rifle would be twitchy, something several readers confirmed.

Sight-in

Sight-in took five shots. As it came from the package the rifle was shooting high and right. The open sights have scales to tell you where they are and I found the windage scale most helpful, getting on target. read more


Benjamin 700 multi-pump repeater: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

Benjamin 700
Benjamin 700 repeating BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Wrong ammunition
  • Two big clues
  • Filling the BB gun
  • The test
  • Sight-in with Daisy BBs
  • Pressure too high
  • Hornady Black Diamonds
  • Getting used to the gun
  • Daisy Match Grade shot
  • Bottom line

Today we learn how accurate the Benjamin 700 multi-pump repeating BB gun is. And we will learn a lot more than that. Let’s go!

Wrong ammunition

Some of you know how I harp on calling a BB gun a BB caliber and NOT .177/4.5mm. Because it’s not! A steel BBs is 0.171- to 0.1735-inches in diameter. It may not matter to people buying one BB gun at a discount store, but to someone like me who has to shoot oddball new and old airguns from all over the world, it makes a big difference.

The Benjamin promotional pamphlet from the 1930s says these guns (the model 600, 700 and 300) use steel Air Rifle Shot of 0.175-inches in diameter. There’s just one problem with that. As far as I can tell, nobody ever made steel Air Rifle Shot in anything but 0.171-0.1735-inches. I wondered if it was possible that the Benjamin writers of that pamphlet were as cavalier back in the 1930s as BB manufacturers are today. Did they really want us to use Air Rifle Shot that is 0.171 to 0.1735-inches in diameter and not LEAD Air Rifle Shot that is 0.175-inches? They did emphasize not using lead balls in these guns. read more


Hellboy semiautomatic BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Hellboy BB gun
The Hellboy BB gun is a realistic semiautomatic repeater.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Air Venturi Steel BBs
  • Adjusted the sights
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Dust Devils
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the new Hellboy semiautomatic BB gun. Let’s get right to the test.

The test

I shot the Hellboy off a UTG Monopod rest at 5 meters. I said in Part 2 that if the gun was accurate enough at 5 meters I would extend the range to 10 meters for another test. We will see today if that is going to happen.

Reader GunFun1 wanted a video of me shooting at a can, but that’s not interesting for several reasons. First, if the can is missed the viewers have no idea by how much. And hitting a soda can with a BB gun doesn’t show up well on film. It’s better in person. But if the Hellboy is accurate enough, I have a plan for how to do what GF1 wants. read more


Ten-meter accuracy test — Daisy 499 versus Haenel 310

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Another failure!
  • The test
  • 499
  • Discussion 1
  • Haenel 310
  • Discussion 2
  • CZ75 P-07 Duty accuracy at 10 meters
  • Summary

I put today’s report in the historical section because it relates to both the Haenel 310 and the Diana model 30 that we tested recently. In the comments to the Diana 30 test the question was raised about which would be more accurate at 10 meters — the Daisy 499 Challenger or the Haenel model 310. I said I thought the 310 would beat the 499 because it is rifled, but several readers wanted to see. So, today we see.

Another failure!

Before I get to the results of today’s test, let me fill you in on another irony. I was going to test the accuracy of the Benjamin 700 today and the gun jammed as I started to shoot. This one has a happy ending, because I got it unjammed and working again, but that was after today’s test. There is more sweet irony in the story that unfolded there, but I will hold off on that until we get to the report. read more


ASG CZ 75 P-07 Duty BB pistol with blowback: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

ASG CZ 75 P-07 BB pistol
ASG CZ 75 P-07 Duty BB pistol with blowback.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • ASG Blaster BBs
  • Trigger blade is curved
  • Smart Shot BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Sight adjustment
  • Dust Devils
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the ASG CZ 75 P-07 Duty BB pistol, and I think you will be surprised. I know I was.

The test

I shot this BB pistol from 5 meters off a UTG Monopod rest. I started out badly, getting such a large 10-shot group with ASG Blaster BBs that I frankly did not believe it. I noticed on the last couple of shots that I wasn’t concentrating on the front sight and I thought that might be the reason for the poor showing. I decided to give ASG BBs a second chance.

ASG Blaster BBs

I’m so glad I did try a second group, because I shot much better this time and also I learned what caused the problem. It wasn’t the sight like I thought, though that was a part of it. This time the CZ75 P-07 Duty put 10 BBs in 1.455-inches. The group is well-centered but low on the target. That means the pistol is sighted to shoot to the aim point, because I was using a 6 o’clock hold. read more


Crosman 102 multi-pump pneumatic repeater: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 102
Crosman’s 102 is a .22 caliber multi-pump repeater.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Clearing the jam
  • The jam
  • Assembly
  • Accuracy
  • Re-sighting
  • Crosman Premiers
  • Crosman wadcutters
  • 10-shots
  • Discussion
  • Summary

You may recall that the Crosman 102 jammed last time I tested it and I had to clear it before continuing. I did that and today we will shoot it at 25 yards. First, let’s clear the jam.

Clearing the jam

Crosman designed the 102 to be easy to clear, but without a manual I had to discover it for myself. The rear peep sight slides to either side, revealing a hole through which many jammed pellets can be removed.

Crosman 102 jam hole
Pull the bolt back and rod the pellet out of the breech. It will fall out this hole.

My jam was more involved, though, and I had to partially disassemble the action to clear it. The top receiver cover is held on by one shoulder bolt that has a large thumbscrew head. Remove it and the top cover slides back and off the receiver. The peep sight is attached to the cover by a rivet and comes off with the cover. read more