1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 2

1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 2 Part 1

The Russian Version of BBs vs. Pellets

By Dennis Adler

There is a lot to like about the Gletcher Nagant Model 1895, one thing not to like is that they are probably in short supply and when this second series is gone it could be awhile until they are back again. It is an air pistol that vintage military arms enthusiasts should own. Whether you like the BB (bottom) or the pellet version (top), is a matter of personal preference. Either gun is very accurate for its size and barrel length; the plus goes to the pellet cartridge-firing model for its increased accuracy range out to 10 meters. Both airguns fieldstrip like the centerfire pistol, which is a very straightforward process.

Since we are talking about air pistols, it is easier to toss theories around and “in theory” the Nagant BB model with the BB loaded at the front of the cartridge and the cartridge nose sealing with the forcing cone, like the original Nagant Model 1895 design, makes the BB model more authentic in operation than the pellet-firing version which has the pellet seated at the back of the cartridge. It is a very minor point, which, in the past, has proven to favor the rear loading cartridges with Peacemaker BB and pellet models. Will a front loaded BB in the Nagant design have as much velocity and accuracy as a rear loading pellet cartridge model? And just for extra measure, we’ll toss in the wild card by also loading the BB model cartridges with lighter weight (i.e. higher velocity) Dust Devils. In Part 3 we will see which gun performs best at 21 feet and 10 meters, the BB or pellet model. It is a question that has been asked before and now with newer BBs to fire (that did not exist when the first Nagant Model 1895 models were introduced several years ago in the Gletcher Russian Legends series); the outcome should be more interesting. read more


1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 1

1895 Nagant vs. 1895 Nagant Part 1

The Russian Version of BBs vs. Pellets

By Dennis Adler

Gletcher offers back and silver versions of the legendary Model 1895 Nagant revolver. The black .177 caliber BB version (bottom) and the current 4.5mm pellet model NGT RF in black with rifled barrel. These are authentic looking CO2 pistols that reproduce nearly all the features found on the original 1895 models. (Russian Nagant holster courtesy World War Supply)

I know, all we hear about is Russia, Russia, Russia, but I’m taking about Mother Russia, 19th century Russia and the golden age of firearms, a time when America’s captains of industry and armsmakers courted the Russian Czars and lavished them with presentation pistols. Samuel Colt was among the first with a magnificent Gustav Young engraved and gold inlaid 3rd Model Dragoon and a pair of matching 1851 Navy Model revolvers that he personally presented to Czar Nicholas I in 1853 and 1854. By the end of the 19th century, everyone from Colt to Smith & Wesson had sold arms to Russia, but in 1895 Czar Nicholas II turned to the Nagant Brothers in Belgium and purchased their newest double action revolver to rearm his military. read more


Sig vs. Sig Part 3

Sig vs. Sig Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

“We The People” and “The Right of the People”

By Dennis Adler

An incomparable duo, the Sig Sauer WE THE PEOPLE in .45 ACP and 4.5mm are the best match up for design and handling of any 1911 pistols. Firing offhand at varying distances, the two semi-autos are almost identical. That demands a special word of caution about brandishing the CO2 model in public (the cartridge model goes without saying). Almost no one can tell it is an airgun unless they are looking at the muzzle. This is the same caution I gave with the Umarex S&W M&P40 and Sig Sauer P226 X-Five, along with a number of other air pistols that are almost indistinguishable from their centerfire counterparts.

Sig’s 1911 CO2 model is not a quiet air pistol, probably a little louder than most blowback action models and it delivers a decent kick when the slide comes back. Not as much as a .22 pistol, but enough to get a feel for shooting a handgun. Like the Sig Sauer 45 ACP Sig 1911 model the air pistol uses the John M. Browning-designed platform of frame, slide, barrel, and recoil system using a recoil spring guide, single recoil spring, recoil spring plug and barrel bushing. The CO2 model follows the same design with internal modifications to accommodate the CO2 firing system which includes an additional lightly wound recoil spring around the barrel, like a blowback action semi-auto. Externally you are experiencing the .45 ACP model when you pick up Sig’s CO2 version of the WE THE PEOPLE. The flat mainspring housing is finely checkered as is the frontstrap, something you will not find on other 1911 CO2 models. Both Sig 1911 models use ambidextrous thumb safeties, the raised palmswell grip safety with extended beavertail and skeletonized hammer also make the CO2 model identical in handling, such as when manually de-cocking or cocking the hammer if a situation dictates that action. read more


Sig vs. Sig Part 2

Sig vs. Sig

“We The People” and “The Right of the People” Part 2 Part 1 

By Dennis Adler

Similitude is the word I would use for these two pistols, identical in every feature except caliber, firing method and recoil. Up to the point where you pull the trigger, there is no difference in handling. The CO2 Sig Sauer WE THE PEOPLE 1911 is a total replacement for every training regimen except live fire with .45 ACP rounds.

For those who have a CCW no one will disagree that training with your handgun is not only essential but can make the difference between being a survivor or a statistic. Of course, no one is going to carry a BB gun for protection, unless you’re up against a renegade gang of ground moles, but with the cost of ammunition and range time, among other things, getting in proper training is costly. Sig Sauer has always had this in mind with their airguns, but never has it been so well expressed as with the WE THE PEOPLE duo of .45 ACP and 4.5mm models. Training with a 100 percent accurate stand in for your centerfire handgun is absolutely worth the price of the air pistol. And even if you don’t have the WE THE PEOPLE .45 ACP model, if you carry, or plan to carry a full-sized 1911, the WE THE PEIOPLE 4.5mm CO2 model is still a 100 percent accurate understudy for a modern 1911 tactical model. read more


Sig .45 ACP vs. Sig 4.5mm Part 1

Sig .45 ACP vs. Sig 4.5mm Part 1

“We The People” and “The Right of the People” 

By Dennis Adler

Mirror images? Not quite, but the two Sig Sauer models, the WE THE PEOPLE chambered in .45 ACP (left) and the 4.5mm (.177 caliber) CO2 model are as close as any two centerfire and blowback action air pistols can be in nearly every detail and feature, making the CO2 model the best 1911 training gun yet.

It is rare that a gun manufacturer becomes directly involved with both the design and the marketing of an air pistol that accurately duplicates the operation and handling of one of its own centerfire models. You can count them on one hand, Smith & Wesson with the M&P40, Webley & Scott, Sig Sauer, and very soon, Springfield Armory. Webley made certain that the CO2 version of its famous MK VI revolver of 1915 was built to the same standards as its legendary .455 caliber revolver by using the original blueprints; much the same will be forthcoming in the manufacturing of Springfield Armory semi-auto pistols and rifles as CO2 models. But Sig Sauer has gone so far as to deliver its WE THE PEOPLE Model 1911 in .45 ACP and 4.5mm (.177 caliber) as a matching pair, making this absolutely the most authentic blowback action CO2 pistol you can own. read more


Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 3

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 3 Part 2 Part 1

The Russian sharpshooter is back

By Dennis Adler

The Mosin-Nagant was the most abundant of all Russian rifles spanning more than half a century of production beginning in 1891. The Model 1944 alone exceeded 4 million and found its way into the hands of the resistance during WWII. Here the Gletcher Mosin-Nagant is paired with two other Gletcher Russian Legends models, the Nagant pellet pistol (holstered) and the TT-33 blowback action semi-auto.

The Mosin-Nagant is among a handful of legendary rifles like the Henry and Winchester lever action models, the M1 Garand, 1903 Springfield, .303 Lee-Enfield, and Mauser 98, that proved their mettle on the fields of battle and became iconic symbols, not only of nations, but of ideals. The Mosin-Nagant was a design that rose above the very history of the nation in which it was created, and played no small role in making that history. As a CO2 model it carries a remarkable heritage that spans from the era of the Czars, to the Russian Revolution, the rise of Communism, through two world wars, and into the present day, where many surviving examples of early to mid 20th century Mosin-Nagant rifles and carbines, and Mosin-Nagant design models (produced by armsmakers in other countries) are still being used. The Mosin-Nagant has had an almost unprecedented 127 years of service since 1891. So, there is a lot to be said about the Gletcher Mosin-Nagant CO2 model, most importantly that it is a worthy representative of its namesake, not perfect, but for an air rifle, quite remarkable. read more


Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 2

Gletcher Mosin-Nagant Model 1944 Part 2 Part 1

The Russian sharpshooter is back

By Dennis Adler

Aside from Russian soldiers, Russian Jewish partisans, men and women alike, joined in the fight against Germany. One of the most common rifles used by the resistance was the Mosin-Nagant, which had been in production for more than 50 years by WWII. The Gletcher M1944 CO2 model is shown with the sling (which comes with the rifle) attached to the stock.

The last variation of the Mosin-Nagant was the M44 carbine (Model 1944), which was adopted by the Russian army late in 1944, and this is the model after which the Gletcher Mosin-Nagant CO2 model is named. The Model 1944 was an updated Model 1938 carbine with the addition of a side folding bayonet. The Russian military still deemed this a necessary tool, especially with increased urban combat toward the end of the war. The bayonet for the M1944 was designed by the N.S. Semin and chosen over several others as it performed exceptionally well with the shorter length of the Mosin-Nagant carbine. The side folding mount for the 15.1 inch cruciform bayonet also made it an unobtrusive accessory when not needed, as well as eliminating the earlier requirement for a soldier to carry a separate detachable bayonet, as with 91/30 and earlier 1891 infantry models. read more