Evanix Renegade double-action rifle Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Papers, please!
First, we’ll go over your homework. Your first assignment was to calculate the approximate average muzzle velocity of the Renegade in both single- and double-action. I didn’t give you any parameters other than the velocities recorded in that report. What I did with this problem was use the 42 shots I told you I would accept for the double-action mode. The range was from 916 f.p.s. to 975 f.p.s., and the average was 948.57 f.p.s. So, that was the average velocity that I got for double-action shooting.

Single-action
Calculating the single-action average was slightly more difficult, because I gave you only 12 acceptable shots to work with (the first and third strings of 6 shots), yet I told you I thought there were about 18 shots available. We’ll have to test that today to see if I’m right. To get the average, I added the first string and took the sum of the second string twice. Doing it that way makes a total for three stings of shots, even though one of them is just a guess.

I did it that way because the first double-action string used up some of the air before the second single-action string was fired. I figured the first shots of a real second string would, therefore, be faster than what was recorded, but the last shots would be slower. By using the slower string of shots twice (shots 13-18), I’d hoped they would account for the difference. Let’s see if I was right.

And, now, the energy
Using my velocities, the rifle gets 28.58 foot-pounds average in the double-action mode with Crosman Premiers and 33.17 foot-pounds in the single-action mode. Of course, the single-action mode is only my best guess at this point.

And, when we move up to Kodiaks
Moving up to Beeman Kodiak pellets, I’m guessing that the rifle will average 32 foot-pounds in the double-action mode and 37 foot-pounds in the single-action mode. That’s just a gut-feeling guess with no formula behind it, but I note that blog reader Malan is guessing that Kodiaks shot single-action will produce just under 35 foot-pounds, so we’re in pretty close agreement. Only testing will tell!

Stop and think
Before I do the test, let’s look at the Renegade for a moment. It gives you a fast double-action shot possibility in return for a reduction in gross power in both the single-action and double-action modes when compared to the standard AR6 rifle. The AR6, which functions only in single-action, delivers power in the mid-50 foot-pounds region. So, there’s a very clear difference between these two rifles. And, the standard AR6 will continue to be offered just as it has been.

What do you want?
What you have to decide is if fast repeat shots are more desirable than sheer foot-pounds. Of course, we still have to take the Renegade to the range, so accuracy is still unknown, but we know a standard AR6 will group 5 Eun Jin pellets in an inch or so at 50 yards. Which brings up another question. Why haven’t I tested the Renegade with Eun Jins?

Well, I will test Eun Jins in the Renegade, but given the performance of the rifle (i.e., a mid-30 foot-pound rifle), I figured that Beeman Kodiaks would deliver better velocity for making those long-range shots. I’ll test Eun Jins for accuracy, as well, so no stone will go unturned. Remember that I warned you this was going to be a HUGE report! Let’s get to it.

Test 3: the single-action string of Crosman Premiers
No more guessing, this is a string of shots all fired single-action. I will shoot at least 18 Crosman Premiers from a 3,000 psi fill, and if the velocity is still within 50 f.p.s., I’ll keep on shooting.

Shots 1-6
1026
1032
1034
1034
1041
1031

Shots 7-12
1033
1034
1018
1027
1029
1007

Shots 13-18
1021
1018
1014
1015
1006
1010

Shots 19-24
1010
1003
1006
999
995
983

The average velocity for this 24-shot string was 1018 f.p.s., which is a muzzle energy of 32.91 foot-pounds. My estimate of the single-action muzzle energy by interpolating the third string of shots was too high by 0.26 foot-pounds. More importantly, I was off on the total number of shots by five, if we accept my criteria of a maximum spread of 50 f.p.s. Had I stopped shooting at shot 18, I would have underestimated the average power a little.

Test 4: the single-action string with Beeman Kodiaks
This test demonstrates what the rifle can do with 21-grain Beeman Kodiaks. They fit much tighter in the chambers (remember, with this gun you load the pellets skirt-first), therefore they seal much better than the Premiers.

Shots 1-6
872
869
879
893
898
890

Shots 7-12
888
880
894
898
900
898

Shots 13-18
892
901
897
900
896
897

Shots 19-24
892
891
892
896
DNR – Shot did not register
885

Shots 25-30
885
871
873
867
869
864

Trouble downrange
I stopped at shot No. 30, not because the string exceeded 50 f.p.s., but because I shot through the silent pellet trap! TWICE! Little bits of crap had been bouncing back at me from the trap with every shot, so when the first pellet went though it sounded the same. The next shot went through a little faster, though, and I knew at once what had happened. Below is what that looks like. I cannot blame the trap, because I used it wrong. You can bet I’ll use a heavy steel trap with this rifle from now on!


It’s only funny if it happens to someone else! This is what happens when you continue to shoot a 37 foot-pound air rifle at a trap rated for 20 foot-pounds. This trap has no steel backing plate and just a thin luan backer board.

A pleasant surprise!
These 30 shots are surprising because there are so many of them! Clearly, this rifle’s valve is better adapted to Beeman Kodiaks than to Crosman Premiers! The average for the 29 shots that did register was 887.14 foot-pounds. That works out to 36.71 foot-pounds, so my estimate was over the mark by 0.29 foot-pounds.

This report is getting too large, so I’ll stop here and finish the strings next time. Besides, I have to clean the splinters off my office carpet.

58 thoughts on “Evanix Renegade double-action rifle Part 3


  1. Probably because the gun is a 6-shot repeater. Every six shots the shooter has to remove, reload, and reinstall the cylinder. So I suspect that it only seems natural that the strings be shot in groups of 6.


  2. BB
    I made a silent trap with the Duct Seal, but I used 1/4″ Lexan for the back. With my S410 on full power, Kodiaks started hitting the back after 3 shots – very easy to tell by the change in the sound. I only had to move over 1/2″ to avoid this and was still in the window of my chrono. I had assumed this would stop happening after I had a few thousand pellets in it, but if yours broke through I guess not. Thanks for this report.
    MCA




  3. MCA,

    On the trap I made (not the one I shot through), I put a steel plate in front of a half-inch plywood back. I’ve hit that thing with 50 foot-pounds and never broken through. It has over 25K shots on it already and is 10 years old.

    B.B.



  4. sorry to ask this but i bought a brand new co2 pistol, should i use pellgun oil on the first co2 or after like the second or third?

    crittercontroller


  5. B.B.

    So, the duct seal is overcome. That is some power. I’ve been a little concerned that my B30 will drill its way through the duct seal of my trap, but by shifting the point of aim, I hope that pellets will build up sufficiently before that happens.

    Matt61




  6. BB,

    Even at “only” 35+ fpe, are you sure you want to shoot it in your office? What’s behind the walls?! You’re no longer talking about an order of magnitude difference from a rimfire at that range.


  7. B.B.

    What is the distance of the range in your office? Maybe I missed your mentioning that. This is sounding like my set-up.

    Matt61








  8. Derrick,

    Me too, I didn’t know a pellet gun could go any farther… wayne

    B.B.

    You said the crossman didn’t fit as tight as the kodiak… could it be that the tighter fit caused less loss of air around the pellets with each shot… so the heavier kokiak can actually give more shots, just because they fit so much tighter..

    Wayne,
    Ashland Air Rifle Range


  9. B.B.

    What are your thoughts on clearing the Type 2 (stovepipe malfunction) in a semiauto pistol? Gabe Suarez, policeman and renowned tactics writer, says that you should rap the bottom of the magazine to seat it; flip the pistol to the right; and rack the slide to eject the stuck round and chamber a new cartridge.

    Meanwhile, Erik Lawrence, former Special Forces Operator and author, says that the procedure above is precisely the wrong thing to do because there is a good chance that you will create a double-feed or Type 3 malfunction which is even worse. So, he says that you should just sweep your hand down the slide and knock the stovepiped casing out.

    The Lawrence method sounds good, but when I tried it, the casing was stuck so tightly in the ejection port that no sweeping would clear it.

    So what does one do?

    Matt61


  10. Matt61,

    This is precisely why Ayoob would say that you need to carry a backup gun.

    I’ve had only a couple stovepipes in my life, and like you, I also seriously doubt that sweeping a hand across the slide would have cleared the gun. Lawrence is correct about the “tap rack bang” technique possibly causing a double feed. The almost impossible part of course, would be ascertaining that it IS a stovepipe in a fraction of a second –probably in the dark– and having the acuity (visual as well as mental) to suddenly perform a complex task. What’s the right way to clear it if you KNOW it’s a stovepipe and there is possibly a live round in the chamber? Personally, I’d want to rip the mag, turn the gun, rack the slide several times and go for a spare magazine and reload. Whatever you do repeatedly in practice is precisely what you’ll do in crisis. Make sure that you properly scold the gun as well. “Bad gun!. Very, very bad gun!”

    Derrick



  11. BB

    Gamo CFX with a gas ram, does it need a mainspring compressor?

    (If not, which ones don’t? I chickened out on working on the FWB 124, I ordered the parts from JM, but I’m sending it out to be done.)

    Did you already figure out the HW55T I saw referring to, or do you need the link?

    Volvo


  12. BB & Derrick,

    I suspect your joke is not too far from the truth when I see some groups posted elsewhere. One of the reasons I trust BB's reports is that he doesn't show micron-sized groups all the time. Point blank from a rest (if applicable) will give some pretty tight groups, then a wide angle shot of the range to prove where you were standing:). Call me a cynic, but I do believe in the moon landings again, after seeing this week's Mythbusters. I think it was on of their best episodes.


  13. BB – I’m gonna stick my neck out here and say that I’ve been able to service many types of spring guns without a compressor. This includes an MP513, and RWS350, and installing a new, unset spring into a Model 48 (I’ll admit, that one was a bit tough). Not to mention the plethora of Gamo’s, Quests, other RWS models and so on. I’ve probably done it around 50-100 times in total.

    I know that nobody is going to recommend doing it this way, and I won’t either. But it would be dishonest to say that it can’t be done if due care is taken. It seems that the typical preload is on the order of 60-80lbs, with 2-3 inches of compression.

    The only reason I’m mentioning this is to perhaps somewhat mitigate the fear that some seem to have of servicing their own guns. Yes, it’s enough power to give you a fair hurtin’ if you’re careless… but I don’t think it’s quite in the category of ‘death waiting to happen’.

    Provided, of course, that one doesn’t attempt to disassemble a cocked gun… which would be a risky proposition under any circumstances.


  14. Matt61,

    Are you in a combat situation when the stovepipe jam occurs, or are you on the target range? Where the jam occurs is the deciding factor in how to clear it.

    In a non-threatening situation you should always remove the magazine from the gun first, then rack the slide to clear the jam. If necessary, be ready to push up the slide stop to hold the slide back, so you have your hands free to clear the jammed cartridge.

    In combat, the first method, correctly labled by Derrick “tap (the magazine), rack (the slide), bang (fire the weapon)” is the correct procedure.

    A stovepipe jam with a 1911 is a rare, strange and bad thing. You never want one because you are shooting what is potentially the world’s more reliable semiauto pistol. If it jams with a stovepipe, get it fixed immediately.

    All other jams are probably caused by either bad magazines or bad ammo. But stovepipes have so many possible causes that it’s impossible to pinpoint them without examination. Do not permit your pistol to continue after it has a stovepipe, because it is unreliable.

    Even my Taurus, which you know has had a plethora of jams, has never had a stovepipe. I think I’ve resolved all the faults of the Taurus, after about 800 rounds and minor gunsmithing, but I would not have tolerated a stovepipe.

    B.B.


  15. Volvo,

    Most guns that get a gas spring do not require mainspring compressors to open, but they do need them to close. Only a gun like the Weihrauch with its screw-thread end cap has the force to push the gas spring into alignment so you can close the gun.

    No shame in deciding not to do a certain job. That’s a good decision. Better than finding yourself halfway through the job with lost and broken parts that are irreplaceable.

    I have never seen the HW 55T you referred me to.

    B.B.




  16. Vince,

    I used to work on them too without a spring compressor. ProSports, TX200′s, R1′s and HW50′s aren’t bad at all.

    I finally broke down and made one in an afternoon when I had to overhaul a FWB 124–life has been much easier ever since. There’s no way I could have rebuilt my FWB 124 without it. That spring is LONG.

    Derrick


  17. B.B. and others,

    Thanks for the mainspring advice. I ordered one of the B-square compressors, but I received an e-mail from the vendor that it was a backorder. I’ll admit the photo from your R-1 book has made me tentative to disassemble spring guns. No need to see it again.

    I’d like to start with the Gamo for practice, the price puts it a category that makes it expendable. Plus I assume parts are readily available.

    As far as the HW55T, my hint must have been too subtle. I noted on your Blog about doing some self research that it seems someone could find just about anything they wanted with Google. Hint. Hint.

    When I ran across the HW55T on gunbroker, I took a three prong approach: Airgun Blue book first, Google, and BB. The first two showed a lower value, especially with the listing in the UK for 350 Euro. I went with the FWB 124, before B.B. suggested the 55T was a strong value.

    The rest of the story is the transaction is not to be. I had linked to Mick’s airgun page with my search, and did not realize that his firearms and airguns are currently in the possession of the authorities. Just a misunderstanding I believe. However, he will not even accept deposits until they are returned. Seems like a very nice Gentleman. The page takes awhile to load; you’ll need to scroll way down to the 55T.

    http://www.micksguns.com/air%20guns.htm

    Wayne – speaking of a hint, that is me buying your CFX. I thought the attached picture of the Volvo in the e-mail would give it away. Don’t worry, I will try and be gentle as I dismantle her.

    Volvo


  18. Volvo,

    I’m probably wrong here, but I don’t think Gamo sells ANY repair parts over the counter. I think the guns must be returned to them for service. If you need a spring you’ll need to disassemble first, measure, and order a comparably sized spring from someone like Maccari.

    The last time I fitted a Gamo with a Maccari spring, it also required making a new spring guide as the stock guide was well over 1/16″ too small in diameter (for the stock spring, too–Ick!).

    Derrick


  19. Derrick,

    Thanks for the heads up on the Gamo parts. The CFX already has the gas ram in it,
    so no spring to replace – I think I can get a replacement trigger and just some practice on opening it up. If it goes well, I could end up in business with Matt. We could sell the extra parts left over after we assembled the airguns as spares.

    Just kidding Matt, by the way, the guy who said the B40 was just purging itself of unnecessary parts had me in tears. Funny stuff.

    Volvo


  20. I have an RWS 54 and I’ve been trying to figure a good way to scope it. It seemed to me there must be a good way to take advantage of the recoil reduction system in order to lessen the forces acting on the scope.
    It occurred to me that semi-automatic pistols are frequently scoped for certain competitions, and the scope is NOT mounted to the top of the slide. Rather, it is attached to a base that is screwed/bolted to the lower receiver of the pistol. Of course, that means the slide and barrel move independent of the scope when the weapon is fired. Yet, it’s obvious from their use in competition that this system is still considered accurate enough for consistent shooting.
    Same thing for under-rail mounted laser designators – they are not affixed to the barrel, but they are still quite useful for getting the projectile to intersect with the target at a known distance.

    My question is: has anyone tried a shotgun style scope base (inverted “U”) to attach a scope to the stock of an RWS 54? With proper stock inletting (for centering the base and avoiding the cocking arm), I think this ought to be possible. Done right, one could even account for barrel droop during the mounting of the scope base. As with a semi-auto pistol, the RWS 54 fires with the barrel in the same starting position every time (in battery), so consistency must exist. If that were not the case, then inconsistencies would show even with scopes mounted to the barrel/receiver (parallax, repeatability of sight picture, etc.)

    This seems so obvious, I feel I must be overlooking something. I gladly welcome any and all of your comments.

    Unfortunately, I have no way to test this out right now, since I’m in Baghdad until November or December. However, once my Uncle Sam lets me go home I plan on having some fun with this concept – if you can’t talk me out of it first!


  21. Volvo,

    You silly guy, If I had known it was you I would have shipped it on Friday… instead of waiting for the check to clear.. I had a strong feeling to ship it but I didn't go with it… sorry.. out on Tuesday for sure..

    Have fun, tear into that CFX, it needs it, right out of the box, and start with the trigger.. they do shoot straight.. but not up the advertised fps. and I can't take a chance people will fire quicker than they want when they put down the CFX and pick up a TX200 or HW77.. the triggers are just too different.. we want to stay within a certain range.. (get it?)

    Kind of interesting you got my CFX and I got the HW-55 you started after.. I didn't know you were after it.. B.B. told me about it, and I just went for it..

    Wayne
    Ashland Air Rifle Range & Rentals


  22. Wayne,

    No rush. I just want it to practice taking one a part, and seeing what trouble I can get into.
    Good chance it will end up back on eBay as a box of parts. I know what you mean about the triggers. You should try a Rekord after Mr. Watts works his magic. (they are like what you have on the HW77) I have not acquired a trigger pull scale yet, but I would guess they are all under a pound.

    Good judgment waiting for the check to clear. I am a little shifty. Just don’t reveal my true identity.

    Volvo


  23. Volvo,

    “Shifty” huh…. I thought those models only came in 6 speed automatic …. your ID is safe with me..

    After you learn on the CFX, I’ll let you open up the HW-55T…. you’ll be ready when it is, right? Or should I send them both together?

    Wayne in Oregon, not in blue

    Ashland Air Rifle Range


  24. Wayne,
    I thought of your concept as well, but since my 54 scoped with Leapers 6-24×56 (and some white athletic tape for extra grip) has no problems, I did not pursue the idea. – Dr. G.


  25. BB,

    I have searched far and wide but I do not really understand what makes a particular pellet like a particular barrel? Or is it a particular barrel liking a specific pellet?

    Thanks.

    David




  26. Wayne,

    As far as I know, nobody has ever tried mounting the scope to the stock on an RWS Diana 54. The chief reason is, they aren’t required. The 54 doesn’t stress modern scopes. Just mount one and be done.

    B.B.


  27. Hey B.B.
    Im looking at the panther striker kit.It shows it with a globe front site.I called spoke to sales rep. but he said he didnt think it came that way.I know pyramyd puts these kits together.So what gives??Is there a globe they put on this kit or is this a different style panther???Or maybe a mix up?
    Thanks
    Scottdog



  28. Scottdog,

    That “globe” is just a sheet metal protector for the front sight. It’s a part that will fit any Diana fiberoptic front sight.

    I have no idea whether it is available, but I can ask.

    B.B.


  29. Thanks B.B
    That one is on my short list.Cant wait to see what the new Air Venturi Pro-Guide Spring Retainer does for it.Look forward to your report.
    Thanks again
    Scottdog


  30. hey man i have a question and couldnt find any other way to contact you. is there any way to put a scope on my old daisy powerline model 93?



  31. Hi B.B.

    Great blog about the Renegade! Can’t wait for the next part!

    Is the information on the Evanix homepage old?
    They only have the AR6 semi-auto but no Renegade.
    AR6 semi-auto = Renegade, is this true?

    Emil


  32. Emil,

    That’s difficult to say, because Evanix is also working on a true semiautomatic rifle. However, the Koreans have used the term semiautomatic just as the Germans (Umarex) have with their pistols – to mean a rifle that fires when you pull the trigger – regardless of how the action really functions. So I really don’t know.

    B.B.


  33. Your report is on the Evanix Renegade. I am looking towards the future purchase of an air powered such as the Evanix AR6 or the Sumatra 2500. Farm use on coyotes, coons and the like. Will .22 be sufficient of will I be better off with the .25 cal? Want as quick a kill as possible to avoid suffering and wounded animals crawling off.

    Both Sumatra and Evanix have a lot of power but it appears .25 is Sumatra only.
    If .22 will work well I have a choice.

    Is one actually better than the other for long term use?

    And, I would fill with a hand pump for at least the first year or so mainly due to cost of electric and no scuba shops within 3 hours.

    Thanks, I enjoy reading some of your writing and it helps with learning what not to do and waste money on.


  34. There isn’t much difference between .22 caliber and .25 caliber in these rifles, though some hunters prefer the .25 for the greater smack it has for smaller game. On coyotes, though, they should be equal.

    I say follow your heart. If you like .25, then get it.

    In terms of long-term quality, the rifles are equivalent. The AR-6 has been around longer, but the Sumatra is just as well-made.

    Filling from a hand pump is tiresome for some people, though I do it all the time and don’t mind it. Remember to cock the rifle when filling from empty, or the exhaust valve will not close.

    B.B.


  35. Wayne in Baghdad,

    Re: Different scope mounting technique for the diana 54

    Let me start by thanking you for your service. Please return home safely.

    You have a very interesting idea about a “shotgun style” base for mounting a scope on the 54. I’ve mounted and remounted a scope on my diana 54 several times and would like to share what I learned with you. First, use the leapers base that has been designed specifically for the diana rifles, with great contribution from B.B. (B.B. did a great 3 part series on this base that can be found with the search engine on this blog). I used a temporary solution with a b-square one piece until this new base recently hit the market. It worked but looked ackward on the gun and because you had to hang the stop over the diana rail it pushed the scope forward and therefor your head position forward on the gun. Second, I’ve had two scopes on the 54. The latest is a leapers 3-12×44 full size swat scope (great scope). Neither scope was stressed. Thirdly, my gun was very hard on rings. Tried b-square adjustables on the new leapers base and the gun shattered them. Tried b-square unadjustables and they wouldn’t quit moving. Currently have a set of warne rings on the new leapers base and after approximately 1,000 shots they haven’t moved.

    Summary. Use the new leapers base. Get a set of good rings.

    Your idea is “out of the box” and admirable but I think you’re taking the long way around the barn since there is now a scope base specifically designed for our guns, the model 54.

    kevin


  36. I have the model 54 and just recently mounted the Leapers 4x16x56mm scope with the large (100mm) side parallax wheel. I mounted this scope with the new Leapers special RWS picatinny mount along with Leapers medium Weaver rings. Let me tell you, this is an extremely accurate and deadly combination. I am getting 3/4″ bench rested groups on calm days with 5 shots and just took a crow from 85 yards yesterday with this combo. Also, in over 700 shots, nothing has moved a micron on this scope/mounting combo. Another outstanding win for Leapers…




  37. Yeah, since the new Leapers mount for these rifles has come out, I have really fallen in love with the 54! It has such a good overall combination of damn good build quality, fit and finish, accuracy, ease of shooting accurately, great knock down power for hunting and the simplicity of being a springer all rolled up in one rifle.

    I am curiously considering a tune for it to see if it would smooth out the firing cycle, the cocking effort and improve the shooting experience just a smidgen more…

    If it does, the only gripe I could come up with would be a little bit nicer trigger (especially one that isn’t so far forward when the rifle is cocked. This would take the rifle to an even higher level ;)


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