HW 35 Luxus: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Trigger adjustment
  • 150 shots
  • In the beginning
  • Best pellet
  • Doubting Thomas
  • No target sights
  • No scope
  • The solution
  • Stock screws
  • Barrel pivot
  • Day two
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll look at the accuracy of my HW35 Luxus. I’m shooting from a rest at 25 yards, and the gun lies directly on the sandbag. I tried holding it with the artillery hold, and it made no difference in group size.

Trigger adjustment

I tested the Rekord trigger before starting and found it was releasing at 2 lbs., 9 oz. That’s a bit too heavy for a Rekord, so I backed out the aluminum trigger adjustment screw as far as it would go and learned something valuable. On the lightest adjustment, the stage-two release of this trigger is just 14 oz. That’s too light for a sporting rifle. It’s almost like a match Rekord that has a lighter return spring. So, I tightened the screw until the release was exactly 1 lb., 8 oz. That feels both safe and right.

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Walther Terrus Air Rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • A sweet action
  • The artillery hold
  • Accuracy
  • Pellets that were less than promising
  • Groups that seem to hold promise
  • Where does this leave us?

Today, we’ll look at the Walther Terrus breakbarrel air rifle accuracy with open sights at 25 yards. I lit the target with a 500-watt halogen light and shot from a dark position, so the fiberoptic sights blacked out completely and looked like conventional post-and-notch sights.

A sweet action

When I cocked the rifle for the first shot, I was reminded of what a sweet action this rifle has. The cocking effort is light, and the breech locks up positively in a way I can’t describe. One click and it’s closed — solid. No muss, no fuss and no movement after the click. It feels like it has a barrel lock, but it doesn’t.

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HW 35 Luxus: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • Freimark
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • JSB Exact pellets, 8.44-grain dome
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • But wait — there’s more!
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger-pull
  • What’s next?

Today, we’ll find out what kind of powerplant is in my new HW35 Luxus. Is it really a 5.5 foot-pound gun, as the German Freimark (capitol F in a pentagram) indicates, or is it something different?

Freimark

The Freimark is a legal designation from the German government. Guns that have it must not produce over 7.5 joules of energy at the muzzle. That converts to 5.53 foot-pounds. If they qualify, such guns are legal for persons 18 years and older to purchase and own as airguns. If they produce more than 7.5 joules, they are classified as firearms and are controlled by those laws.

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RWS Diana 45: Part 10

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8
Part 9

RWS Diana 45 air rifle
Diana 45 is a large breakbarrel spring rifle.

This report covers:

  • Cause to reconsider
  • More black tar?
  • What is black tar grease?
  • A quick job
  • Velocity
  • Summary

Today’s report is an unprecedented test. I thought I’d finished the report on the Diana 45 in Part 9, but it still bothered me that I couldn’t get the last bit of vibration out of the gun. I chalked that up to the high number of parts in the rifle’s powerplant. Too many things to make quiet.

Cause to reconsider

Then two things happened that caused me to reconsider. First, while at the Malvern airgun show, I saw and shot a fabulous HW85 that had been tuned by Bryan Enoch. It was stunningly calm. When I talked to him about his tune, Bryan told me that he put a thin coat of black tar grease on the mainspring before he assembled the rifle. That caused me to stop and think — because that tune was perfect.

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Walther Terrus Air Rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • First up — JSB Exact RS pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Vibration
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger-pull
  • Chronograph problem solved?
  • What’s inside?
  • Evaluation so far

Today, we’ll see how fast the .22-caliber Walther Terrus breakbarrel air rifle shoots. We’ll also learn some other things about the state of this Terrus’ tune as it comes from the box. There’s a lot of interest in the Terrus, both because of the price and also because it comes from Walther.

First up — JSB Exact RS pellets

The first pellets I tested were the 13.43-grain JSB Exact RS domed pellets. They fit the bore loosely and averaged 649 f.p.s. for 10 shots, with a range from 646 to 658. The spread was 12 f.p.s. At the average velocity, it generates 12.55 foot-pounds of energy at the muzzle.

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HW 35 Luxus: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW35
HW35 Luxus

This report covers:

  • The HW35
  • Barrel lock
  • Sights
  • Weight and length
  • Me and the HW35

I’m going to start this report by eating some crow. Or is it humble pie? I never remember. I want to say at the start of this report that reader Dom was right, and I was wrong about my new HW35 Luxus. Dom told me that his 35 had a Freimark (a capitol F inside a pentagram — the German symbol for airguns developing less than 7.5 joules) and he wondered if mine did, as well. If it did that might be why it shoots so smooth. I told him my gun didn’t have one.

Except it does. A great big one!

You see, I got 2 air rifles at the Malvern show — this HW35 and a BSF S54. When I looked at the gun for Dom I looked at the S54 instead of the 35.

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Walther Terrus air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther Terrus
Walther’s Terrus rifle with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • Quick notes
  • The Terrus
  • The rifle
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Stock
  • A threaded muzzle!
  • Overall impression

Quick notes

Thank you for being patient in April. It was a busy month for me!

Now that the last event is over, I’ll get back to accuracy tests for both the Benjamin Bulldog and the Hatsan BT-65. I now have additional bullets for the Bulldog and additional pellets for the Hatsan, so this should be good. I hope to get to the range later this week with both of those rifles.

I finally got my HW 35 at the Malvern airgun show, and it came with a big surprise. The rifle has been tuned! From the feel of it, the tune was a good one; but, of course, I need to test it thoroughly to know for sure. I had plans for tuning the rifle after my basic test, but now those plans will hinge on how well the rifle is already shooting. I may leave it as it is. I hope it’s also accurate.

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