How the Price-Point PCP (PPP) has changed the face of the airgun world

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex’s Gauntlet was the first PPP to be announced, but several others beat it to the marketplace.

This report covers:

  • Gauntlet dropped!
  • For Hank
  • For the manufacturers
  • What is a PPP?
  • Cost
  • Required features
  • Nice features to have
  • Caliber
  • ALL BOATS ARE FLOATED!
  • Compressors
  • Other PCPs
  • Sig
  • AirForce Airguns
  • On and on
  • Summary

Gauntlet dropped!

When Umarex announced the new Gauntlet air rifle the savvy airgunning world was stunned. A precharged pneumatic (PCP) that was a repeater, was shrouded with an active silencer, had an adjustable trigger and stock, was accurate and came with a regulator — all for less than $300. They named it appropriately, because it was a huge gauntlet to drop on the airgun community. I’m sure this is exactly what Umarex had in mind, though the particulars of how it has and still is unfolding I’m sure have been as much of a surprise to them as they have been to others. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Trigger adjustment
  • Whiskey3 4-12X44 scope
  • Today’s test
  • Velocity with the lead Crux Pb
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • How fast will she go?
  • Easy cocking!
  • Barrel loose when cocked
  • Trigger pull
  • First stage?
  • Summary

Today we will find out about the velocity of the .22-caliber Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle that I’m testing. Before we get into that, though, I have a couple things to address.

Trigger adjustment

First, reader Siraniko asked this:

“You will have to show us a picture how the trigger is adjusted while in the gun. The only picture I could find of how to adjust the trigger showed it while separated from the gun (https://www.pyramydair.com/blog/2018/08/my-day-at-sig-sauer-part-2/).”

That’s a good question. He asked because I showed the bent Phillips screwdriver that’s used to adjust the trigger pull weight. So let’s discuss the trigger adjustments now. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • The silencer
  • Accuracy
  • Tools
  • Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope
  • Can the scope be used without the ranging system?
  • Summary

Today I will finish the general description of the new Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle. If you want one you should have placed an order during the Cyber Monday sale, when they were 20 percent off!

The silencer

Let’s begin with the silencer. I mentioned in Part 1 that it is a real one with technology inside. Instead of baffles Sig uses three “hair curlers,” or at least that’s what they look like. They are in series and are each wrapped with felt. I can tell you that they definitely work. Also the gas piston in this rifle is very quiet, which makes the ASP20 the quietest spring-piston airgun at this power level. read more


Sig ASP20 rifle with Whiskey3 ASP 4-12X44 scope: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig ASP20
Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle.

This report covers:

  • ASP20
  • Two calibers
  • Wood stock or synthetic stock?
  • First impression
  • What about wood?
  • And synthetic?
  • Description
  • Trigger
  • Safety
  • Whose gun is it?
  • Summary

It’s here! The Sig ASP20 breakbarrel rifle with the Whiskey3 4-12X44 scope arrived at my house Friday evening, and I already have an independent opinion to share. I will get to that in a bit.

ASP20

ASP stands for Advanced Sport Pellet—the original name of SIGAIR — the Sig Sauer group that’s responsible for airguns. The number 20 indicates the foot-pounds of energy that can be expected from a .177 caliber version of the rifle. Obviously this power varies by pellet, but it gives you a ballpark to consider.

Two calibers

The rifle is offered in both .177 and .22 calibers and in the larger caliber the expected output climbs to 23 foot pounds. I asked for the .22 caliber to test because at this power lever I feel it would be the smoothest of the two. Ed Schultz of SIGAIR agrees with that. read more


What is it about old guns?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • I like old airguns
  • Garand
  • Peabody
  • What about old airguns?
  • Hakim
  • Falke 90
  • FWB 124
  • Summary

Today I am writing about something that moves me as a shooter and as a writer — old guns. Because this is an airgun blog I will talk about old airguns, too, but even old firearms really get me excited. Why is that?

I like old airguns

I have been holding off on a special blog series about a Webley Mark VI pellet revolver with a battlefield finish that I have had on order since June. See — BB has to wait, just like everybody else. This revolver also comes in a plain blue finish and a silver finish that I guess passes for nickel, but it’s the battlefield finish that I want. Guns with the two other finishes are in stock and have been for months — only the battlefield finish is backordered. Why is that? Why is it that more people want something that looks worn and used, rather than something brand new and pristine? read more


Scoping problematic airguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The problems
  • Problem 1 — All rifles are droopers!
  • Problem 2 — horizontal alignment
  • Problem 3 — scope eyepiece is in the wrong place
  • What is the solution?
  • Clearance
  • Summary

Today’s report was partly inspired by reader Decksniper, who asked this about the Seneca Aspen rifle:

“I am interested in the shim you used to mount the Bugbuster on the too narrow dovetail. A closeup picture would be helpful.”

I told him I would photograph the shim in the next part about the Aspen, and I will, but this morning (yesterday for you) I was faced with scoping another rifle — the Diana Stormrider Generation II PCP, and it suddenly dawned on me that scoping airguns is one of the biggest challenges I face in writing this blog. As I pondered that it occurred to me that scoping guns is a challenge for all of us. Some may not have realized what a challenge it is because they have become adept in avoiding the problem altogether, but a challenge it is. read more


Tin can chronograph

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How powerful is it?
  • Tin cans are not tin!
  • SAFETY!
  • Aluminum cans
  • Hickory tree chronograph
  • Back-door-to-hickory-tree chronograph
  • Leaf chronograph
  • The house silencer
  • Out of BBs
  • We were soldiers once, and young
  • Out of matches

No, this isn’t a “how to” piece about making a chronograph from a can. It’s a story about the past. For some of you it’s a story about “the old days” when we were kids and life was still fun. For others it goes back before you were born. But for all of you it should be interesting. So grab your coffee and let’s reminisce!

How powerful is it?

When I was a kid in the 1950s we all coveted the BB gun. As with all things in life, there were the “haves” and the “have-nots.” I was a have not, but I lived next door to a kid who was a have. Duane had a Daisy BB gun. It was some sort of El Cheapo model that didn’t come with a forearm, and it also shot to the left, but he knew exactly how much to hold off and was pretty good with it. The ownership of that small gun made him the Alpha in the neighborhood. read more