Single mom teaches children to shoot – Part 6

Single mom teaches children to shoot – Part 6

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Well, today mom is going to start the kids shooting actual pellet guns. We did that in Part 4, but in Part 5 we got back to the schoolroom training again, so I’m going to pretend that the kids haven’t touched off a shot yet.

She decided on the Daisy 953 for her boys and each boy has his own rifle, so the sights can be left set where he needs them. She bought the separate Daisy 5899 receiver sight for each rifle, figuring that if the boys wanted to go farther with this she could always upgrade.

Since mom is by herself, she will let one boy at a time shoot, while the other boy stands behind the line and helps her. This will make the sessions last longer, but the benefit will be a more rapid development of responsibility in both boys. That’s because the non-shooting boy will have to learn to subordinate his thoughts and desires (and his talking) while his brother shoots. If mom can’t get cooperation like that, she can always end the session early. read more


Single mom teaches children to shoot – Part 5

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Despite the title of this report, it’s actually written for anyone who’s trying to teach a new shooter, child or adult how to shoot. The age of the shooter is unimportant. The first four parts of this report have dealt with setting up the range, class discipline and how to conduct a shooting class. Today, we’ll get to the actual teaching.

The triangulation system
When I was a youngster, my mother enrolled me in an NRA-run course that taught me how to shoot. This was in the late 1950s, and the techniques used to teach us back then were those that had been popular both before and during World War II. I’ve researched both the modern U.S. Army and Marine Corps marksmanship syllabi and find that what I’m about to show you is, unfortunately, no longer taught — but it should be! Today’s lesson could turn out to be the most valuable teaching technique for training new shooters that you ever learn. read more


Single mom teaches children to shoot – Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

As we begin today’s report, remember that I’m doing this for a single mom with two young boys to teach. Everything I write is from that perspective.

Okay, you’ve had enough time to get everything together from the list I gave you in part 3. And I assume that you have chosen a safe place to shoot. That would be a place where the cat and dog cannot suddenly pop up downrange without your knowing about it, or a place that has no door downrange that can’t be locked so people don’t suddenly walk into the line of fire.

Your first session
Remember, this is supposed to be fun. So, enter it with that mindset. The first step is to get the pupils to pay attention. You talk to them about it and explain that on a firing range everyone listens to the rangemaster (range officer or whatever). Tell them you will be testing them on this from now on. read more


Single mom teaches children to shoot – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today, we’re going on a shopping trip. We’re going to look at all the stuff (besides the gun) that you need to teach children to shoot. I talked about the different guns you could look at in part 2, so I’ll assume you have something in mind. The stuff I’m going to look at today is the stuff that husbands and boyfriends never think about until you’re ready to start the shooting session…and then they try to improvise. We’re not going to improvise. We’re going to have the right stuff at the beginning.

Safety
Safety is the stuff people tend to forget about. There’s not too much, but it’s darned important to the program, so let’s get it right the first time. The first thing we’ll look at is a backstop. read more


Single mom teaches children to shoot – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

In the case of one mom and two kids, it might be best if only one child shot at a time. Let the other child watch, but don’t let him touch his gun. That way, mom can concentrate on just one person. Younger kids are full of false moves, and you’ve got to know when it’s time to call an end to a session because of horsing around. It’s best to have this talk before shooting begins. Explain to the kids that safety is so important that if they violate a rule in any serious way they’ll end that day’s session. I said in part 1 that you want to use a long gun for training. Handguns are too short and their muzzles move too quickly to be good training tools for shooter education. read more


Single mom teaches children to shoot – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Update on Tom/B.B.: The doctor in charge of Tom’s case says he’s healthy enough to go home shortly. They’ll be tying up some loose ends over the next few days.

B.B. wrote today’s blog.

Today’s blog was inspired by a reader named Cathy, who asked for help in the comment section of video No. 4. She has twin 7-year-old boys who want to learn how to shoot. I wanted to answer her and all the other single moms who are in the same situation. However, the info I’m providing is applicable to anyone who wants to teach kids to shoot. There’s a lot to this, so this is going to be a multi-part series. read more