Mauser 300SL target rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Mauser 300SL
Mauser 300SL. There are three finger scallops along the cocking lever.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Velocity
  • Hobby
  • Disassembly
  • Tuning tip
  • Build quality
  • It worked!
  • Oil the piston seal
  • Velocity after lubrication
  • Qiang Yuan Training pellets
  • Sig Sauer Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Trigger
  • Impressions

I’m diving right into the Mauser 300SL. Today will be velocity day, plus I will try to treat the mainspring(s) with Tune in a Tube. Lots to do, so let’s get started.

Velocity

If I don’t test the velocity of the rifle before trying to tune it I know many readers will be upset, but I’m only going to test a single pellet. That will give us a before/after comparison with Tune in a Tube. However, the way this rifle vibrates, there is no way I’m not going to try to calm it down. It’s supposed to be a target rifle anyway, so raw velocity is not important.

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Mauser 300SL target rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Mauser 300SL
Mauser 300SL. There are three finger scallops along the cocking lever.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Description
  • Sights
  • Taploader
  • Trigger
  • Not much information
  • Summary

Here we go! I told you I would be reporting on those airguns I acquired from the Gun Broker website. This is the first of them. The Mauser 300SL is an underlever spring-piston target rifle that is almost a 10-meter rifle, but not quite. After examining it, it appears the people who made this rifle were concentrating more on the style of the zimmerstutzen, rather than a modern 10-meter target air rifle. I’ll explain as we go along.

Description

The 300SL is an underlever that looks something like a Feinwerkbau 300. But there are many differences. For starters, this is a recoiling air rifle. No attempt was made to cancel the recoil. Given that it was sold in the 1980s, that takes it out of the running for 10-meter competition. The FWB 300 was already obsolete in the ’80s.

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BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Front sight hood
  • The test
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Sights don’t adjust for windage
  • RWS Superpoint
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Summary

Today we start looking at the accuracy of the BSA Meteor Mark 1. I will just shoot with open sights today, and to do that I had to remove the hood over the front sight. It doesn’t provide enough clearance to see the bead otherwise.

Front sight hood

The hood is a stamped steel part that slips over the muzzle and slides over the front sight bead. It removes easily. I think it is amazing that it’s still with the rifle after a half-century!

BSA Meteor hood
The hood that fits over the front sight is too low to see the target well. It slips off, so I removed it.

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The cobbler’s children have no shoes!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • B.B. needs help!
  • What about my Diana 27?
  • Ten yards
  • We have lost 95 percent of shooters!
  • Blue Streak
  • Spoiled?

B.B. needs help!

Before we begin today’s report, I need to ask for some help. In fact, today’s report drove this request. I was going to write about the Rockin’ Rat target, Part 2, and I wanted to show you a short video of how it works. The main thing about this target is the way it works, and trying to tell you about it is like trying to describe the taste of salt.

I can film the video, but I’m not yet familiar enough with the editing software to edit it efficiently. Pyramyd Air can’t help because they are working full time on their projects.

What I need is someone who can edit short videos for me. If I could find someone to do that there could be a lot more videos on this blog. The person should be familiar with the requirements of You Tube, because that’s where the videos are hosted.

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Walther Parrus with wood stock: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Walther Parrus with wood stock
Walther Parrus with wood stock.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo 15.89 grains
  • What to do?
  • Changed my hold
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.53mm
  • Evaluation

It’s been a long time, but today is the 25-yard accuracy test for the Walther Parrus with wood stock I’m changing things today, so try to keep up.

I installed the Sun Optics Tactical Hunter First Focal Plane Scope in BKL 30mm Double Strap high rings. I looked at the Parrus barrel alignment before mounting the scope and noted that the test rifle has a major barrel droop. I therefore shimmed the rear ring, but I thought that would not be enough, and I was right. This Parrus I am testing droops as much as any Diana breakbarrel I ever tested, so consider that when you select a scope mount.

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Time out with B.B.

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • New old airguns
  • Tune in a Tube
  • Serendipity
  • More serendipity
  • More stuff
  • Parrus inletting is tight!
  • Summary

I needed to pause from testing airguns and related products today to tell you about some real neat things that are happening in my world — and by association — in this blog.

New old airguns

I guess it’s no surprise that the blog’s history section is very popular with a lot of readers. It is for me, too, because I get to see airguns I have only seen in the Blue Book of Airguns or in old references. I now watch Gun Broker and some of the online airgun sales sites, plus whenever I go to an airgun show I’m always looking to buy something we haven’t yet seen. The Crosman 600 pistol and the BSA Meteor Mark I both came from the recent Texas Airgun Show, and you have seen what’s been done with them.

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BSA Meteor Mark I: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BSA Meteor
BSA Meteor Mark I.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Disassembly
  • Mainspring compressor
  • The trigger!!!
  • Rust!
  • Other parts
  • Trigger parts
  • Mainspring
  • Lubrication and assembly
  • Trigger
  • Cocking effort and trigger pull
  • RWS Hobbys
  • RWS Superpoint
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Discussion

Today I am disassembling the BSA Meteor Mark I for cleaning, inside and out. I’m going to get rid of that pesky rust, plus all the grit I saw when the gun was apart last time. I’ll also be able to tell you how well Tune in a Tube had spread throughout the action,. which is something most owners will never know. There is a lot more to today’s report, so let’s get started.

Disassembly

This time I knew exactly how the Meteor would come apart. Even the trigger that I told you is different from the trigger in my Meteor Mark IV was easy to disassemble, although I will come back to it at the end of the report.

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