Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Texas Airgun Show
  • Model 100
  • Refinished and resealed
  • Description
  • Bolt action
  • Sights
  • Reference material
  • What’s next?

Today we begin looking at a variation of a multi-pump pneumatic rifle we have seen before. And when I say we’ve seen it, we have never seen this particular variation. What we have looked at its sibling, the .22-caliber Crosman 101. Both rifles got their start with the Crosman model of 1924, which was a .22-caliber multi-pump that came to market in — you guessed it — 1924!

The model 100 is simply the .177 caliber variation of the 101. It is scarce because during the time when it was manufactured, .177 was not a popular caliber in the United States. The larger .22 sold many times as many guns — probably for all the reasons you have discussed on this blog.

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The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Premiers are best
  • By the triggerguard
  • Extended hold
  • Resting on the bag
  • Getting tired
  • Evaluation
  • Summary

Today will be something a little different. In the previous report reader Siraniko asked me why I changed my artillery hold when I moved from the 10-meter accuracy test to the 25 yard test. Reader GunFun1 picked up on that question and wondered how we would know which hold was best. That made sense, plus I enjoy shooting this rifle, so I promised to do another 25-yard test in which all I change is the hold. That’s what I’m doing today.

Premiers are best

Without question Crosman Premiers turned in the tightest group in that last test, so they were the only pellet I used for this test. I began the test with the same artillery hold I used in the last report — my off hand held under the middle of the cocking slot. No particular reason for holding it there last time, except the farther out I hold it the more stable the rifle seems. By that I mean that the crosshairs don’t dance all around the target. It makes the rifle easier to hold, which is as good a reason as any, I guess.

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Owning vintage airguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Only new for me!
  • The RidgeRunner story
  • Kevin’s story
  • Whacky Wayne
  • Hey, BB — where are the airguns?
  • A lot of them can be fixed
  • Vintage pneumatics
  • Shaving is the best test
  • Blade shape and thickness
  • Don’t forget CO2
  • Summary

Reader Michael gave me the idea for this report when he made a comment to yesterday’s blog, referring to my discussion of the bent versus unscragged mainspring.

“I suppose, too, that if a particular air gun is firing or cocking abnormally, a bent mainspring is one of the usual suspects.”

That comment is so true that it started my brain firing on both cylinders! The bottom line is — what’s it like to own a vintage airgun?

Only new for me!

Some of you steadfastly refuse to look at vintage airguns, for fear you will encounter some problem that can’t be fixed. Does that ever happen? You bet it does! Have a look at my greatest failure — the pogostick repeater. Read that report and look at the pictures. After I wrote that I gave the rifle to former reader Vince, who attempted to put it back to being a vintage Diana. He failed, too, and today it’s just a pile of parts somewhere.

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How to sharpen a straight razor: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The bevel is the key
  • How to test for sharpness
  • Setting the bevel
  • How to move the blade against the stone
  • The center sharpens first
  • A progression of stones
  • Shaving is the best test
  • Blade shape and thickness
  • Inventing the kydex sharpening guide
  • Tie-in to airguns
  • Singing blades
  • Summary

Today I will tell you how to sharpen a straight razor. In the three months that I have been exploring this subject I have discovered that sharpening straight razors is a lot like learning about airguns. Of course the two have almost nothing in common, but what I’ve learned is there are many people talking about the subject without really knowing what they are talking about — or they have such poor communication skills that what they do know they cannot possibly pass to another person. That’s so like the field of airguns! There are people who can shoot extremely well, but for the life of them they can’t tell anyone else how to do it.

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Weihrauch’s HW55SF: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 55SF
HW 55SF.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Readers impact
  • The test
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Now, I zeroed the rifle
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic match pellets
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • But wait —
  • Summary

Today we look at accuracy. Because several readers have asked for it, I will re-test the rifle after I have tuned it. I have not decided yet whether I will do a full parts replacement tune, so there may be nothing to compare a Tune in a Tube tune to (say that quickly three times), but I will at least return and re-test the accuracy with the same pellets after I have quieted the action.

Readers impact

Several readers believe that making a spring gun’s action smoother will improve accuracy. It certainly won’t hurt it, but I have never found it to improve. However, I did an extra test today to see if I am doing all the things I can to get all the accuracy this rifle has to offer. We will get to that after the main test.

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Weihrauch’s HW55SF: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 55SF
HW 55SF.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic
  • RWS R10
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Next
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the HW 55SF target rifle. I will tell you now that I was surprised by the performance. This is an air rifle that lives for years in my gun closet and only occasionally gets shot, so I forget how it works. It’s like a brand new airgun every time.

I have owned several HW55s over the years. One was the Custom Match that was their final release of the 55 series. It came out several years after the World Cup matches had switched to FWB 150/300s and Walther LGRs, so it never had a chance to dominate, but it was still quite a target rifle.

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The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • Crosman Premiers
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • POI shift!
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Evaluation
  • Summary

It took me a month, but today I’m back with the HW 85 to test the accuracy at 25 yards with a scope. In Part 3 I had a meltdown, turning in some of the worst groups I have ever published in this blog. I felt strongly that it was because I couldn’t see the front sight and today we will find out whether that was right.

I mounted a UTG 3-12X44 AO in 30mm BKL high rings. This scope is very clear and well-suited to the HW85’s power. The BKL mounts won’t slip even under recoil.

Sight-in

The scope was already zeroed from the Diana Stormrider test so sight-in went pretty fast. I started with two shots at 12 feet and then backed up to 25 yards for the test.

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