Air Venturi Dust Devil BBs: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dust Devil box.
Air Venturi Dust Devils will hit the market in a few months.

This report covers:

  • BBs rebound
  • Smart Shot
  • Weight
  • Composition
  • Accuracy?
  • Hard Target?
  • Do they work?
  • Acid test!
  • Application
  • What they will and won’t do
  • Long-term test
  • Summary

Today we are going to look at something entirely new — the Air Venturi Dust Devil BB. It’s a BB that can be fired at hard targets with little fear of rebound, because the BB disintegrates on impact. I have been playing with these for several months now, and they do deliver on that promise!

BBs rebound

Ask anyone who shoots BBs and they will tell you — BBs rebound from hard targets. They can come back at the shooter almost as fast as they went downrange. You may recall that little Ralphie Parker discovered that when he fired the first shot from his Red Ryder in the movie, A Christmas Story. Well, he wasn’t the only one! Little BB Pelletier busted his lower lip when a BB fired from an Anics revolver rebounded from 10 meters away. That BB left the pistol twice as fast as Ralphie’s — 500 f.p.s.! I shouldn’t have shot it into a steel bullet trap to begin with, but do as I say — not as I do. I said, “Aww — it’ll never come all the way back here.” Right! Reminds me of guys who shoot .22 long rifle ammo at golf balls and get surprised in exactly the same way.

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The Beeman R10/HW 85: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 85
Weihrauch HW 85.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Lead Sled
  • Rifle rested on sandbag
  • The artillery hold
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I will shoot my vintage HW85 at 50 yards for you. One thing I’m testing is whether resting the rifle on a Caldwell Lead Sled will improve accurate. Reader Bob from Oz says it will. We’ll see.

The test

The day was perfect for a test like this. It was 34 degrees with just a hint of a breeze. I shot in three different positions that I’ll describe as we go. The rifle is still sighted in for 25 yards, so the pellets dropped about 3 inches at 50 yards. And I used the Crosman Premier pellet that has worked so well for this rifle in the past.

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Crosman 102 multi-pump pneumatic repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 102
Crosman’s 102 is a .22 caliber multi-pump repeater.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The rifle
  • Test 1
  • Rebuilt
  • Examine the power band
  • Trigger pull
  • Surprise!
  • Test 2
  • Magazine capacity
  • Feeding
  • Label
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of the Crosman 102 bolt-action repeater that we are testing. This test went in a different direction than I expected because of the rifle’s design. I will explain as I go.

The rifle

You know that I just finished the test of the Crosman 100, and I’m getting confused between that rifle and this one. I re-read Part 1 for this rifle to familiarize myself with its operation, and good thing that I did. I had forgotten one thing that turned out to have a huge influence on today’s test. But I’m getting ahead of myself.

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Airgun flaws to watch out for

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Spring piston guns
  • Thumb amputation
  • Not over yet
  • Arrow launchers
  • Breech failures
  • Mistakes happen
  • Triggers
  • Not just BSF
  • CO2
  • Finally

Today’s blog was suggested by reader RidgeRunner after we had a short discussion of the Modoc big bore rifle. Here is what he said.

“Perhaps you should give serious consideration to a blog about flawed designs for airguns. It could be most informative, most especially to the newbies. These episodes show much thought must go into the design of an airgun and also that care must be used when handling them.”

I didn’t want to write just about one airgun, and this seemed like the perfect way to address the issue. Additionally, there are many more shooters who are new to airguns, and this is a necessary safety topic for them.

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The Beeman P1 air pistol: Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7
Part 8

Beeman P1
Beeman P1 air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Sorted pellets
  • Sorting RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Pre-test work
  • Another teat?
  • Modifications?
  • Back to the test
  • 4.55 Premier
  • 4.56 Premier
  • The test changes
  • Deep seated again
  • Meisterkugeln with 4.54mm heads
  • Discussion

Today I will conduct the accuracy tests of the Beeman P1 that you readers requested. There’s a lot of ground to cover, so let’s begin.

Sorted pellets

Based on the fliers I was getting in Part 6, you asked me to sort the pellets by head size. I chose the Crosman Premier 7.9-grain pellet and the RWS Meisterkugeln Rifle pellet for this test, because they both performed the best in the last accuracy test.

I used the PelletGage to sort pellets by head size. Premiers were first, and I discovered their heads ranged from 4.54mm to larger than 4.56mm, which is the largest hole on my gage. Most were either 4.55 or 4.56mm, with 4.56mm being the most common.

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Kral Puncher Breaker Silent Synthetic .177 PCP repeater: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Kral Puncher Breaker rifle
Kral Puncher Breaker bullpup with synthetic stock.

This report covers:

  • The big question
  • Description
  • Synthetic stock
  • Single shot tray
  • Fill
  • Adjustable power
  • Discharge sound
  • Sights
  • Bipod mount
  • Evaluation

Today we begin looking at the Turkish-made Kral Puncher Breaker precharged pneumatic (PCP) repeater. The one I’m testing is a .177, but they also come in .22 and .25 calibers. In the caliber I’m testing the magazine holds 14 pellets. The price is the same for all three calibers, at $500, which pits this rifle against the Benjamin Marauder.

The big question

Okay, let’s address the big question that’s on every reader’s mind. Where do they get these outlandish names?!!! Puncher Breaker? Are they kidding? It has to sound better in Turkish, don’t you think?

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Remington model 33 single shot rimfire: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Remington 33
Remington’s model 33 single shot .22 was their first bolt action rimfire.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The new desire
  • How accurate?
  • Start point
  • 30 minutes later
  • Differences
  • Summary

Happy New Year! May 2018 be a blessed year for each of you!

Today will be a short report, if you don’t mind. No — I didn’t stay up that late on New Year’s Eve. I wrote this last Friday, as is my custom of staying a little ahead of the blog. I am getting ready for the 2018 SHOT Show and a lot is happening, so I’m trying to stay ahead.

Yes, this is still an airgun blog. If you read Part 1 you’ll discover that this report started with a friend from church who had a pest problem. I tried solving it with an airgun, but he was ahead of me and solved it himself with a shotgun. But it got me looking at my old Remington model 33 single shot bolt action .22 rimfire, shooting CB caps. Read Part 1 to catch up. I’ll wait.

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