Posts Tagged ‘AirForce 3-9×40 AO scope’

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Announcement: Wesley Santiago is this week’s winner of Pyramyd Air’s Big Shot of the Week on their airgun facebook page. He’ll receive a $50 Pyramyd Air gift card. Congratulations!

Wesley Santiago submitted this week’s winning photo for BSOTW.


The Cometa Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Oh boy! Another new precharged air rifle to test! This one is called the Lynx V10 and is made by the Spanish firm of Cometaand distributed in the U.S. through AirForce International. Instead of offering these guns through AirForce Airguns, the company has elected to create a separate entity called AirForce International that will sell all the products that are not made in the United States. The Cometa line launches this endeavor.

The Lynx V10 has been seen in the U.S. previously but was represented by smaller dealers who sold whatever configuration the company made. AirForce International has requested specific standard specifications for the guns they sell, and they will have other exciting changes to announce in the future.

The rifle I’m testing for you today is the Lynx V10 — a .22-caliber 13-shot sidelever repeating precharged rifle. It takes a conventional 3,000 psi/206 bar fill of air in the 290cc reservoir. Although the reservoir appears to be removable, it can be left in place on the gun and filled through a standard male Foster-type filling in the bottom of the stock.


The reservoir remains in the rifle and is filled through a standard Foster male nipple! Note the onboard pressure gauge.

I’m testing serial number 30638-11, but you won’t be able to buy this one because I’ll have to return it to AirForce International, who supplied it for this test. They sent the rifle mounted with an AirForce 3-9×40 AO scope, so that’s how I’ll test it. I have both the single-shot adapter and a 13-shot magazine, so I’ll test both for you.

According to the AirForce International website, the rifle will deliver velocity from 700 to 1,000 f.p.s., depending on the weight of the pellet. So, I’m expecting power to be in the 30+ foot-pound region.

General description
The rifle I’m testing is mounted in a natural wood finish stock. The test rifle stock has a pleasing grain pattern and appears to be walnut, though the specifications do not list it. Other stock finishes of blue and black are available.

The rifle weighs 9.5 lbs. as tested, with the scope mounted and single-shot adapter installed. The advertised weight of just the rifle alone is 7.8 lbs.

It is 41.3 inches in length and has a pull length of just under 15-1/2 inches. That pull may be too long for many shooters. I find it very comfortable, but I do like a longer pull. The black rubber buttpad adds an inch to the stock. If you need to trim the pull, that’s the place to start.

The stock is completely ambidextrous, and only the sidelever on the right side of the receiver and the fact that the single-shot adapter swings out to the right for loading shows any bias whatsoever. The comb has a very tall and sharp Monte Carlo profile, and the cheekpiece is subtly raised on both sides of the butt. Both sides of the grip and forearm are covered with attractive checkering.


The sidelever cocks the action and the single-shot adapter can then rotate out to the side for loading.

The forearm is quite wide, while the butt is surprisingly narrow in cross-section. The forearm, though, has to house the back part of the air reservoir, so the wide forearm does not add any weight to the gun. The resulting feel of the rifle is that it’s large but not overly heavy — at least so far. The pressure gauge is inset into the left side of the forearm, where it’s easy to read.

The barrel is shrouded and has a bull-barrel look. I’ll report on the sound at firing after I’ve tested it indoors for velocity, and perhaps again after accuracy testing outdoors. The fat shroud should be able to do an effective job. While the test rifle does not contain any baffles, there’s a large collection chamber in front of the true muzzle — not unlike what’s found in the production Talon SS.

Trigger
The trigger is two-stage and adjustable for pull weight. The one on the test rifle seems to be adjusted perfectly. I plan to leave it alone until I shoot the rifle for accuracy, because it’s right where I want it. Stage one has some weight to it, and stage two breaks glass-crisp.

The cost
This is a sophisticated PCP, make no mistake. The reservoir is regulated, and the power is adjustable. I’ll explore the latter after accuracy testing, but the former will come to the forefront when I report the shot count. Many of you have asked about the utility of a regulator — well this rifle has one and now we’ll see how well it works.

So, yes, the Lynx V10 is pricey, but before we close our minds, let’s see what it has to offer. It should be on par with the Air Arms S510 and similar European PCPs.

Cometas are coming!
This Lynx is just the first of a flood of Cometa airguns that are coming from AirForce International. Next week, I’ll begin a report on another exciting new gun. But focusing on the Lynx for now, I plan to chew on this report a little longer than the usual three reports — both because the brand is new to many of you and also because the Lynx has so many performance features that deserve to be fully tested. So, sit back and enjoy the ride!

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