Air Venturi Avenger repeating air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Avenger
Air Venturi Avenger.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Start testing accuracy
  • Bug Buster 3-12X32
  • The test
  • Sight in
  • JSB Exact Jumbo 
  • RWS Superdome
  • Beeman Kodiak
  • Sig Crux Pb
  • Air Arms 16-grain domes
  • Beeman Devastator
  • Sniper Magnum
  • Magazine — the final test
  • Summary

Seldom has a day like this happened in this blog — and I mean that in the best possible way! This is going to be a biggie!

Start testing accuracy

Today we start testing the accuracy of the Air Venturi Avenger that I’m testing. So far the Avenger has stood up very well and I have been hoping that it’s as accurate as everyone seems to say. Well — it is! I have a lot to tell you, so let’s get started.

Bug Buster 3-12X32

I have been thinking about this test for a long time and wondering which scope to mount. The Meopta Optika6 is the best scope I own and would do very well on this rifle, but the Avenger is a lightweight PCP. How about a scope that’s suited to the concept of light weight? I mounted the UTG Bug Buster 3-12X32 on the rifle and it seems ideal to me. read more


Air Venturi Avenger repeating air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Avenger
Air Venturi Avenger.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Test strategy
  • Why was it showing higher?
  • Adjusting the regulator
  • Are you following this?
  • The test
  • Beeman Kodiak pellets
  • The regulator
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Beeman Kodiaks
  • The last string
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Test strategy

Today I will begin the velocity test. The Air Venturi Avenger is so adjustable that it will take several reports to cover just the velocity. Not only is the hammer spring adjustable — the regulator is, as well. In fact, that presents a challenge for how I will test the rifle. The rifle came out of the box with a charge of 3,600 psi and the regulator set to 3,000 psi. That means that until the internal pressure falls below 3,000 psi, the pressure that the valve “sees” will always be 3,000 psi. That is the highest pressure to which the regulator can be set — at least accurding to the manual. read more


Air Venturi Avenger repeating air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Avenger
Air Venturi Avenger.

This report covers:

  • The Avenger
  • The lowdown
  • Features
  • Performance
  • Description
  • Fill
  • Two gauges
  • Manual
  • Where is it made?
  • Silencer?
  • Summary

You readers know that I select the topics I write about and the guns I test. Pyramyd Air who owns this blog has given me great latitude to run the show as I see fit. And that arrangement has worked well for 15 years.

However, every once in awhile Pyramyd Air gets a product they would like me to test. They are taking a risk, because they know that I will test it and report whatever happens — both good and bad. I try not to insult anyone when I write about a product, but I also tell the truth as it unfolds, because I worry about the guy who can only afford that one airgun and may base his decision on what I write. Pyramyd Air knows that and trusts that I will be as honest as possible. read more


IZH-61 repeating spring air rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

IZH 61
The IZH 61 sidelever repeating air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • The rear sight
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • What if I really, really tried?
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • No longer seating pellets in the clip
  • RWS R-10 Match Pistol
  • RWS Hobby
  • Trigger behavior
  • Firing behavior
  • Feeding reliability
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the IZH-61 repeating pellet rifle I am testing. And I’ll give you a heads up. There is a surprise coming. At least it surprised me!

The test

I shot off a rest at 10 meters. I tried to use the artillery hold, but the pistol grip of the 61 sort of foils that. Let’s just say I held the rifle gently. And I shot 5-shot groups.

I had planned to shoot one pellet from each chamber of the clip at different targets when I found the best pellet, but as you will see, that will not work today. I will explain as we go. read more



IZH-61 repeating spring air rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

IZH 61
The IZH 61 sidelever repeating air rifle.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The start
  • Fast-forward to 2019
  • Incomplete?
  • Get a clip
  • The rifle
  • Sights
  • Front sight
  • Rear sight
  • Repeating function
  • Clip release
  • Barrel
  • Summary

“I hear it’s really a 10-meter target rifle the Russians disguised as a cheap toy, so their kids would learn to shoot like marksmen.”

“No, it’s a magnum in disguise. They export it shooting 500 f.p.s., but with a little tweaking you can get it over 800 f.p.s. with no problem.”

“The ones with metal magazines and steel receivers are the only ones to buy. When they switched to plastic the rifle went in the trash can.”

“I used to buy them 10 at a time for $30.”

“I know a guy who spent over $500 dressing one up to shoot as a target rifle. He beat FWB match rifles with it.” read more


Cometa Lynx V10 precharged repeating air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle

The Cometas Lynx V10 is an exciting precharged repeater.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Before I start, here’s a reminder that the Roanoke Airgun Expo will be held on Friday and Saturday, October 19 and 20. If you can come, try to arrive on Friday (noon to 7 p.m.), because that’s when the best deals are found — though there can be some good local walk-ins on Saturday. They say the show goes 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, but don’t believe it. By 1:30 the place starts clearing out fast.

The location is in the Roanoke Moose Lodge #284 at 3233 Catawba Valley Drive in Salem, VA, but don’t expect to find it with Map Quest. Just drive up Catawba Valley Drive (which is on Map Quest) several miles until you see the Moose Lodge on a hill on your right.

Mac and I will have a couple tables there. Mac’s bringing a couple 10-meter guns, and I’m bringing that cased FWB 124 I wrote about. Other dealers like Larry Hannusch will be there, and you never know what you will find at this show. Several of our regular blog readers such Fred from the PRoNJ and RidgeRunner will also be there. If you’re a blog reader, please stop by my table and say hi. Okay, let’s get to today’s report.

Today, I’ll show you the results of shooting the Cometa Lynx precharged air rifle at 50 yards. This is the real acid test for any air rifle — precharged or otherwise. They may hold together well out to 35 and even to 40 yards, but I’ve found from long experience that 50 yards separates the good ones from the great ones. And it exposes the ones that can’t keep up.

And here’s an important reminder for newer readers. I shoot 10-shot groups unless there’s a good reason not to. I always tell you if I’m shooting less than 10 shots. Five-shot groups simply do not test a rifle’s accuracy. What they test are the laws of chance, a shooter’s hopes and a bunch of other things that aren’t important, but 10-shot groups prove the real accuracy of the airgun.

My groups will always be larger than those you see elsewhere. Ten shots will group larger than 5 shots in so many cases that it isn’t worth thinking about. Whenever I go back and read these reports to find out the accuracy of an airgun I’ve tested, I’m so glad when I tested it with 10 shots and disappointed if I tested it with less. I hate the additional work it entails, because every one of those shots has to be perfect, but the result is well worth the effort.

News from AirForce
The day before I went to the range last week to test this rifle, I got a call from John McCaslin of AirForce. He told me they’ve been testing all the Lynx rifles and they found that dialing the power back to 20 foot-pounds produced better results for them. You’ll recall from Part 2 that our Lynx is putting out pellets at close to or just over 30 foot-pounds. So, based on that information, I went to the range with the power dialed back to about 20 foot-pounds.

I did that over the chronograph the day before going to the range. There were two pellets that John told me were giving him good results — the 15.9-grain JSB Exact pellet that had not done so well for me at 25 yards and the 18.1-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy that was the best pellet in my 25-yard test.

John told me to adjust the velocity until the 15.9-grain JSB was going about 750 f.p.s., so that’s what I did. It took 2 complete turns of the power adjustment screw to get it to that velocity, where it produces 19.86 foot-pounds, and I nailed that average.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle power adjustment
The Allen screw atop the rear of the receiver (in the upper right corner of the photo) is loosened so the power adjustment screw can be turned. I had to remove the scope to loosen the top screw, so I left it loose for adjustments at the range. The position of the Allen wrench leg tells you where the adjustment has been moved relative to where you began.

To adjust the power, loosen the locking screw atop the rear of the receiver, so the power adjustment screw will turn. I had to remove the scope to get at this screw; but if I owned this Lynx, I’d cut the short leg off an Allen wrench for this job. Then the scope could remain in place.

Since I was going to the 50-yard range and the 4.5-14×42 Hawke Tactical Sidewinder scope was available, I installed it at this time. It’s the clearest scope I have, and I wanted to give the Lynx every opportunity to shine.

Beautiful day!
I get to the range very early to avoid the wind that always picks up in this part of the country. Unfortunately, on this perfectly calm day, there was another shooter already there and he was one of those super-gregarious types who likes to tell you his life’s story in 30 minutes or more (per anecdote!), so I had to be a little rude. If I’m not done shooting by 9 a.m., I’m out of time because the breeze almost always kicks up. I also had the Rogue to test on this day, but I tested the Lynx first because the Rogue’s bullets are heavy enough to buck a little breeze.

The first pellet I tested was the 15.9-grain JSB. Unfortunately, the test rifle still did not like it, even at 20 foot pounds, so I stopped the group after just 6 shots. The group was already at 1.871 inches, and I didn’t see any future in it. As I said, I was burning sunlight fast and trying to pull away from Gabby the Gunman on the next bench, so I shifted to the 18.1-grain pellets next. We were the only two shooters at the entire range complex and, with a dozen benches on the 50/100-yard line, he had to sit right next to me and shoot his short-barreled Remington 600 in .308! The blast reminded me of tank gunnery!

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 15.9-grain-target
Even at 20 foot-pounds, the test Lynx still does not like JSB 15.9-grain pellet. I shot only 6 times at 50 yards.

While it sounds like I’m rushing, I’m actually taking a lot of time with each shot. I’m just moving as fast as possible for everything besides shooting. But with 10-shot groups, it’s vital that no shot can be called a flyer. Because if it can, you have to shoot the group over again.

The 18.1-grain pellet was much better at 50 yards, though the final shot did open the group quite a bit. But it was a perfect shot on my end — that was just where the pellet went. Ten shots went into a group measuring 1.756 inches, but 9 of them went into 1.005 inches. And this was on low power, with this pellet going about 710 f.p.s. The breeze was just beginning to kick up, so I adjusted back to high power and shot another group.

Cometa Lynx V10 precharged air rifle JSB 18.1-grain-group-low-power
Ten 18.1-grain JSB Exacts made this 1.756-inch group at 50 yards. Nine went into just more than one inch. read more