Things you can do to make your new airgun better: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• The trigger
• Be careful!
• Adjustment is fine
• Lubrication
• The best thing you can do with a new airgun
• Final recommendation
• Summary

This report is written at the request of Jennifer Cooper Wylie, a follower on my Facebook page. A few days ago, she asked me to address this subject, and I thought it would make a wonderful report for all the people who are new to airguns.

This subject is large, so I’ve broken it into powerplants. Today, I’ll address spring-piston guns, only. So, when I say airgun today, I’m talking only about springers.

You have a new airgun. What can you do to make it better? Even if it isn’t brand new, you may be able to find a manual for your gun, and that’s where you should begin.

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How and why guns wear out: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• Materials first
• Wood and steel
• Design
• Gas springs
• Double action revolvers
• So what?

Today, we’ll look at some airguns and discuss how and why they wear out. I had to do the firearms first in Part 1 to get the basics of metallurgy and design into the discussion. Today, when I talk about those same things from an airgun viewpoint, readers will understand that it isn’t just airguns made of the wrong materials with poor designs that make them subject to fail early. We now know this is a common problem.

Materials first
First, I want to talk about materials. Airguns can be made from cheaper materials than firearms because they don’t have to endure the same pressures and heat that firearms do. Even though they wore out too soon, those iron muzzleloading firearm rifles were still made of better stuff than most airguns.

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How and why guns wear out: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Introduction
• Firearms first
• Two factors to consider
• Metallurgy
• Design
• Summary

Introduction
I made the statement last week that some action pistols wear out with use, and it set off a huge round of discussion. Some owners have already experienced what I was talking about, and others were incredulous that their guns could ever wear out! Ever! Today, I want to begin a series that explores how and why airguns wear out — and believe me, some do.

Before you run screaming through the halls, shouting, “I knew it was too good to be true,” please leaven what you are about to read with some common sense. All airguns do not wear out in the ways I’ll describe. I’m looking at specific guns and types of guns, so factor that into what you read.

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Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle
FWB Sport air rifle.

This report covers:

• Assembly
• Lubrication
• Testing the rifle
• Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• Evaluation to this point

Today, I’ll finish the tune of the Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle, and then we’ll test it. When we ended the last report, we had looked at all the parts and cleaned off the excess gear oil.

Assembly
Now it’s time to assemble the rifle. I looked at the trigger assembly that receives and holds the piston rod when the rifle is cocked. It’s very similar to the 124 trigger, but I can see refinement in fit and finish. This won’t be an easy trigger to modify, but it’s so nice as it comes from the factory that this isn’t an issue. I did not lubricate the trigger before assembly, but I did dry off the gear oil.

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Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle
FWB Sport air rifle.

This report covers:

• Disassembling the Sport
• Spring guide was loose
• Remove the piston
• Piston comes out
• Mainspring tube/compression chamber finish

Okay, today the Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle comes apart, and we’ll start looking inside. This report is huge, so it will take today and tomorrow to complete.

Some of you might like to compare what you see in the Sport to the FWB 124. That can be seen in the 15-part report I did on the FWB 124.

Okay, enough explanation. This is what you’ve been waiting for, so let’s get to it!

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Can CO2 guns be left charged?

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Today is the Memorial Day holiday in the U.S. It’s the day we honor those who have given the ultimate sacrifice to defend our nation. Edith and I would like to join the rest of the country in remembering all these heroes from the Revolutionary War down to today.

This report covers:

• Technology advances as time passes.
• Not all guns changed over time.
• What about 88-gram cartridges?
• How does a charged gun suffer?
• How long can a CO2 gun be left charged?
• Can you leave a CO2 gun charged?

I’m writing this report for my good friends at Pyramyd Air. They get questions all the time about this topic, and they wanted me to discuss the whole story. It’s long, so sit back and enjoy it.

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Airgun lubrication — pneumatics

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 1
Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 2
Airgun lubrication — gas guns

This report addresses:

• What is a pneumatic?
• No. 1 lubrication need.
• A short pneumatic history.
• Which oil to use?
• Other lubrication.
• Wipe down.

This report was written for blog reader Joe, who asked for it specifically; but I know that many of our newer readers also found the information useful. Today, we’ll look at pneumatic guns. There are 3 very different types of pneumatic airguns — precharged, single-stroke and multi-pump — but I think they’re similar enough to cover all of them in the same report.

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