How and why guns wear out: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Introduction
• Firearms first
• Two factors to consider
• Metallurgy
• Design
• Summary

Introduction
I made the statement last week that some action pistols wear out with use, and it set off a huge round of discussion. Some owners have already experienced what I was talking about, and others were incredulous that their guns could ever wear out! Ever! Today, I want to begin a series that explores how and why airguns wear out — and believe me, some do.

Before you run screaming through the halls, shouting, “I knew it was too good to be true,” please leaven what you are about to read with some common sense. All airguns do not wear out in the ways I’ll describe. I’m looking at specific guns and types of guns, so factor that into what you read.

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Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle: Part 8

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7

Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle
FWB Sport air rifle.

This report covers:

• Assembly
• Lubrication
• Testing the rifle
• Crosman Premier lite pellets
• Air Arms Falcon pellets
• Evaluation to this point

Today, I’ll finish the tune of the Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle, and then we’ll test it. When we ended the last report, we had looked at all the parts and cleaned off the excess gear oil.

Assembly
Now it’s time to assemble the rifle. I looked at the trigger assembly that receives and holds the piston rod when the rifle is cocked. It’s very similar to the 124 trigger, but I can see refinement in fit and finish. This won’t be an easy trigger to modify, but it’s so nice as it comes from the factory that this isn’t an issue. I did not lubricate the trigger before assembly, but I did dry off the gear oil.

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Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle: Part 7

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6

Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle
FWB Sport air rifle.

This report covers:

• Disassembling the Sport
• Spring guide was loose
• Remove the piston
• Piston comes out
• Mainspring tube/compression chamber finish

Okay, today the Feinwerkbau Sport air rifle comes apart, and we’ll start looking inside. This report is huge, so it will take today and tomorrow to complete.

Some of you might like to compare what you see in the Sport to the FWB 124. That can be seen in the 15-part report I did on the FWB 124.

Okay, enough explanation. This is what you’ve been waiting for, so let’s get to it!

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Can CO2 guns be left charged?

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Today is the Memorial Day holiday in the U.S. It’s the day we honor those who have given the ultimate sacrifice to defend our nation. Edith and I would like to join the rest of the country in remembering all these heroes from the Revolutionary War down to today.

This report covers:

• Technology advances as time passes.
• Not all guns changed over time.
• What about 88-gram cartridges?
• How does a charged gun suffer?
• How long can a CO2 gun be left charged?
• Can you leave a CO2 gun charged?

I’m writing this report for my good friends at Pyramyd Air. They get questions all the time about this topic, and they wanted me to discuss the whole story. It’s long, so sit back and enjoy it.

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Airgun lubrication — pneumatics

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 1
Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 2
Airgun lubrication — gas guns

This report addresses:

• What is a pneumatic?
• No. 1 lubrication need.
• A short pneumatic history.
• Which oil to use?
• Other lubrication.
• Wipe down.

This report was written for blog reader Joe, who asked for it specifically; but I know that many of our newer readers also found the information useful. Today, we’ll look at pneumatic guns. There are 3 very different types of pneumatic airguns — precharged, single-stroke and multi-pump — but I think they’re similar enough to cover all of them in the same report.

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Airgun lubrication — gas guns

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 1
Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 2

This report addresses:

• Molecules versus atoms
• Crosman Pellgunoil
• Can’t over-oil with Pellgunoil
• “Fixing” leaking guns with Pellgunoil
• Transmission stop leak oil
• Oiling moving parts
• Ballistol

Let’s look at lubricating gas guns — and by “gas,” I mean CO2. What I’m about to say will also work on airsoft guns that operate on green and red gas, because both those gasses work similar to CO2; but there are no pellet or steel BB guns that run on any gas except CO2 (excluding air).

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Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Airgun lubrication — spring guns: Part 1

This report addresses:

• Identifing and lubricating high-stress parts
• Lubricating with moly
• Lubricating triggers
• Lubrication intervals
• Lubricating mainsprings
• General lubrication
• Preserving the airgun with oil

Well, the immediate response we got to the first installment of this report made it one of the all-time favorites. In that report, we looked just at the piston seal, which I said was half of the lubrication solution for a spring gun. Today, we’ll look at everything else.

Parts under high stress
The moving parts of a spring gun are the powerplant parts, the trigger group and either the barrel, when it’s used as to cock the gun, or the cocking mechanism if the gun isn’t a breakbarrel. When airguns were simpler and less stressed, all of these parts could be lubricated with gun oil or lithium grease. But today’s guns are stressed to higher limits and generally need something more specific and better-suited to each application.

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