by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

I’m still testing the velocity of the Evanix Renegade rifle. I’m doing such a thorough job because this rifle is very different than the PCPs we’ve seen to-date. The double-action trigger feature makes the Renegade stand on its own as a powerful repeater – something that, until now, has been very expensive.

Today, I’ll finish those questions I’d asked about velocity in the last report..namely what do Beeman Kodiaks do on double-action and how do Eun Jins perform?

Test 5: double-action string with Beeman Kodiaks

Shots 1-6
763
750
758
757
769
775

Shots 7-12
781
773
773
782
774
790

Shots 13-18
789
785
784
781
794
811

Shots 19-24 (first acceptable string)
790
789
790
798
821
830

Shots 25-30
814
813
814
812
823
838

Shots 31-36
828
825
824
817
837
839

Shots 37-42
827
838
834
833
829
829

Shots 43-48
833
833
824
826
810
812

Shots 49-54
810
809
797
796
794
791

If we weren’t convinced before that this rifle won’t tolerate a 3,000 psi fill for double-action firing, this test certainly proves it! Sticking with my criteria that a 50 f.p.s. velocity spread is the most we’ll tolerate, the first 3 strings have to be discarded. Yes, shot 18 was at 811 f.p.s., but shot 20 was back down to 789. The high was 839, so 789 just barely squeaks by. However, if we consider shot 18 as the start, we do get 37 good shots within the maximum spread criteria, but I would lop that back to 36 shots, because that’s 6 full cylinders.

The average of the 36 shots I’m counting is 817.42 f.p.s., for a muzzle energy of 31.16 foot-pounds shooting double-action. My estimate was high by 0.84 foot-pounds.

If you’re shooting squirrels in the bird feeder at 25 yards, forget the 50 f.p.s. spread criteria and use everything from the second string on, giving yourself an incredible 48 shots per fill! If you want small groups at 50 yards, better keep the velocity under tighter control. Remember how to control that by determining the correct maximum fill pressure for YOUR RIFLE! Don’t be a slave to a number!

Test 6: single-action string with Eun Jins
The AR-6 rifle was made for Eun Jin pellets, so the Renegade cylinder accepts them too. In fact, they load easier than Kodiaks because of a narrower skirt.

Shots 1-6
755
765
766
766
773
768

Shots 7-12
767
771
775
779
780
778

Shots 13-18
779
783
782
783
783
785

Shots 19-24
773
779
790
796
787
785

Shots 25-30
778
793
781
776
776
772

Shots 31-36
776
771
776
766
763
760

I stopped recording here, for the purpose of calculating the average, but I also fired another string of 6 to demonstrate what happens when the gun falls off the power curve.

Shots 37-42
761
749
750
742
724
707

The average velocity for the first 36 shots was 776 f.p.s. That calculates to 37.98 foot-pounds. So, the Renegade is capable of 38 foot-pounds with 28.4-grain Eun Jins. That’s pretty much the maximum you’ll get from this rifle. Yes, even heavier pellets will extract a little more power, but notice that the 21-grain Beeman Kodiak isn’t that far behind the 28.4-grain Eun Jin. About 2 foot-pounds is all that separates them. And, the Kodiak is 100 f.p.s. faster. It’ll be interesting to see what kind of accuracy these two pellets deliver.

You can also see that the velocity drops off rapidly when it starts to decline, which is why it isn’t a good idea to squeeze the last possible shot from every fill. Thirty-six shots is an unbelievable number for any PCP shooting at the 38 foot-pound range, and the maximum variation for those 36 shots was just 41 f.p.s. If you’re paranoid about tight velocity spreads, you could knock off the first and last strings by adjusting the starting fill pressure and still have 24 powerful shots with just 29 f.p.s. maximum spread and a slightly higher power average.

There’s a puff of air coming from around the cylinder with every shot; given how the rifle is made, I don’t see any way around it.

Test 7: double-action string with Eun Jins
By now, you’re getting a good grasp of how the Renegade performs. You’ve learned how to estimate the energy increase when heavier pellets are used, and, of course, you know how to convert energy back into muzzle velocity using the same muzzle energy article with interactive formulae. Knowing all this, forgive me for not shooting a complete string of double-action shots with the rifle. These tests are burning up pellets fast, and Eun Jins don’t come that many to a tin to begin with, but we don’t have to forgo knowing how the gun performs altogether.

Since you’re now very savvy about how the Renegade operates, I don’t have to shoot an entire string of shots to get a good picture of performance. I can shoot just a single string of 6 shots and get the same picture. We know the rifle doesn’t perform well on high pressure, so I’ll fill it to only 2400 psi. It should be very powerful there. We can tell from the Kodiak double-action test that Eun Jins will get as many or slightly more shots from a fill, so there’s nothing more to be learned by shooting a huge string of shots.

Here we go. Rifle is filled to 2400 psi.

Shots 1-6
707
700
703
704
714
715

That string should be somewhere in the middle of the larger sting of double-action shots we know are in the rifle. The average of the string is 707.17 f.p.s., giving an average muzzle energy of 31.54 foot-pounds. Compared to the 31.16 foot-pounds we got from the Beeman Kodiaks, it seems a trifle on the low side to me. I would have expected 32 foot-pounds. But, you can see we’re very close to the exact performance of this pellet in double-action. This is a good way to conserve expensive pellets.

Enough velocity testing. Next time, we’ll shoot at some targets!