Bersa BP9CC CO2 BB pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Bersa BB pistol
The Bersa BB pistol looks very much like the firearm.

 

Bersa BB pistol caliber
In fact, it looks like the firearm so much that they even put the firearm caliber on the slide (it’s really on what would be the barrel in the firearm)!

This report covers:

  • Introduction
  • Description
  • Read the manual
  • Blowback
  • Safety lever popped off!
  • Tactical sights
  • Striker fired
  • The test

Introduction

Today we begin looking at the Bersa BP9CC BB pistol in dual tone finish from ASG. This test was requested some time ago by several readers, and I’m glad to finally take the gun out of the box.

Description

The Bersa BP9CC is a small sidearm. It’s slightly larger than a pocket pistol, which is diminutive for a sidearm. It’s a close copy of the Bersa Thunder firearm that chambers the 9X19 (Luger) cartridge. The pistol I am testing is a two-tone gun with a silver slide and black frame. The slide is metal and the frame is polymer — similar to many new handguns today. Because the gun is small, the grip is both slim and comfortable for average adult hands.

The polymer frame is thin, so I know the firearm has a single stack magazine. The magazine has a flared polymer finger rest on the front of its floorplate, which extends the grip. At the front of the gun a Weaver/Picatinny dovetail is molded into the underside of the frame. There is a single cross slot to anchor any mount — no room for more. I imagine this dovetail is for a laser on the firearm, and why not on this pistol, as well?

The parts are all heavy, making the pistol feel good and substantial in the hand. While the advertised weight of 1.35 lbs. sounds light, it really isn’t when it’s in a small package like this. The test gun with a CO2 cartridge installed weighs 1.7 lbs.

Read the manual

ASG can pat themselves on the back, because I actually had to read the owner’s manual to discover how to load the CO2 cartridge! A button on the bottom of the grip frame is depressed, releasing the backstrap that swings back and detaches. The CO2 cartridge piercing screw is completely hidden from view when the stick magazine is loaded

Blowback

The trigger feels odd because it engages nothing when the gun is not loaded. You can pull it repeatedly and it just swings back and forth. Once a CO2 cartridge is loaded and pierced and the safety is rotated off, the gun does fire and the slide blows back. That’s right, this pistol has blowback! The slide movement is short, so the impulse from the blowback is felt a lot less than most guns that have blowback.

The trigger qualifies as a single-stage design. The takeup is very long, then the trigger pull is moderate and fairly nice. I do feel some creep, but nothing excessive.

Safety lever popped off!

I dry-fired the pistol, a couple times so I could comment on the blowback and on the final shot the black safety lever flew off its post. It’s just pressed on, so watch that when you shoot the gun. The black plastic lever is actually a key that rotates a switch inside the slide. If you lose it you can still probably work the safety. After I pressed the lever back in place it didn’t come off again, so perhaps it wasn’t installed correctly by the factory.

Bersa BB pistol safety
The safety lever rotates, and the arrow points to the gun’s condition. When it is set to fire, the letter S is covered by the lever.

Tactical sights

The sights are modern tactical sights, with two white dots on the rear sight and one white dot up front. They are quick to acquire, yet appear practical. I’ll know more after I test the pistol for accuracy. They do not adjust, but the rear notch appears clean and well-defined.

Bersa BB pistol sight
The sights are tactical and not adjustable.

Power

This pistol has a short barrel (2.91-inches) which makes it difficult for CO2 to achieve any velocity. The advertised velocity is 350 f.p.s. and I will be happy to see that from a gun this small.

Striker fired

Like so many modern pistols this Bersa is striker-fired. There is no hammer — either exposed or hidden — that fires this gun. The striker is inside the slide and gets cocked when the slide is pulled back or blown back during firing. Younger shooters will have no difficulty adapting to the design, but dinosaurs like me will look for the hammer. That’s not a comment on the BB gun by itself. The firearm works the same way.

The good thing about the Bersa is it has the most aggressive slide notches I’ve ever saeen to assist with the pullback. They are large and aggressive, in one direction, only! I like them!

The test

I will test this pistol the same way I test all BB guns — at 5 meters, rested. I will test it with a variety of BBs to get a feel for what it likes. Most buyers will probably purchase those BBs that are most convenient for them, but sometimes I am surprised when a BB gun performs better than expected. This could be one, so we want to give it every chance to succeed.

51 thoughts on “Bersa BP9CC CO2 BB pistol: Part 1

  1. Thank you! I see more and more of these toy’s? And I like them! I thought I would never have an Air soft gun? But! Who knows I may have one of those also! Get some rest! I know you got BIG week-end coming! Semper fi!


  2. You know I ain’t much of a pistol person.

    But I do like the bb and pellet pistols that have the blow back and really like the working toggle on the P.08 and that it can be feild dressed pretty much like the firearm version.

    What I like is when they are made like the firearm version and work the same and have the same weight.

    And it always interests me how they hide the Co2 cartridge.

    And as I always say I’ll be waiting for the accuracy test.




      • I’m with Reb on liking pellets over BBs for their accuracy. A BB pistol still seems like just a toy to me, despite the big-ticket price on some. Crosman’s new Icebreaker looked interesting but that one seems to have disappeared from their website.



        • I said about a year ago that I would not buy BB only guns anymore but then some of the better replicas started coming out so I had to swallow those words. Since then I’ve become something of a collector of these handguns, primarily the ones that are faithful replicas of the original handguns. Right now I am waiting for the Sig Sauer P226 pellet pistol to arrive in stock. I bought it 2 months ago before there became such a delay. It’s due in on the 31st.

          G&G


          • Good luck on the 31st! It would be nice to start seeing how they’re gonna do in their newest ventures. It’ll probably be another year before they bring their PCP line to market. The M712 is gnawing on me, before they’re discontinued.


            • Thanks. I got the MCX at the same time. I’m really curious as to how that one performs.

              I kind of expect the P226 to be pretty good. Everyone seems to be getting better at manufacturing these handguns. Especially in the accuracy dept. They all seem to be able to shoot pretty well. Standing unsupported with relaxed, fast shooting at 10 meters I like them to hold 2″ to 3″ groups regardless of the shot count. So far so good.

              G&G



      • Reb
        I myself if I did get one it would have to be the pellet version if that option was available.

        Just so many more choices of pellets available to help get the gun shooting more accurate than bb’s. Although there is more of a choice for bb’s now days.


      • Reb,

        The new Sig Sauer P226 and P250 semi-auto pistols coming soon are advertised as having blowback. Both shoot pellets and maybe BBs, but I can’t find any confirmation about shooting BBs. Pyramyd Air at this time is listing an estimated in-stock date of 8/31/15.



          • Reb,

            I’m also eager to get the Sig Sauer P226. I’ve already got the Umarex Beretta PX4 and the Gamo PT85 semi-auto pellet pistols. I want to do a side-by-side comparison of the three. At this time I think I get better groupings with the PT85 than I get with the PX4 and am eager to see how the P226 compares.


  3. Does the slide lock back on the last shot, if so i could forgive the fact it has a stick mag. I’ve been getting interested in Piratical Pistol, and 3 Gun and here in the UK these are the sort of things we are limited to us, still jolly good fun you.



      • It’s nice that they did put that feature in the pistol though even if its 70% effective.

        That’s what I like is when the air gun version works as close as possible to the firearm version. I want it to resemble the firearm for practiceing hold and the way it feels.


  4. BB– I have been spoiled by my pistols with adjustable sights (Umarex 586, Daisy 747, Crosman 2300, 357, 78 , etc.) I will not buy any pistol or revolver , unless it has a rifled barrel, shoots pellets and has adjustable sights. There are enough of them on the market to satisfy me. I will not buy a pistol that will probably disappoint or frustrate me( my friends Makrov is accurate at 5 m, but shoots several inches low and to the left. ) Of course this is just my opinion, but I am sure that a few shooters share it. Thanks for testing all the different kinds of guns, Who know,s, you might be able to change my opinion . Ed





    • Reb,

      Sounds like you are liking the re-inforcment rings? They are nice. The pink and orange are best for lower light, with the green not too bad. The yellow are hard to see on white, but would stand out well on something black. You can also use a “Sharpie” to highlight the ring(s),….inner and outer parts.

      I use them for 10 groups, but once you have something “dialed” in, you can aim dead center and go for the “no touch” bullseye. Oh yeahhhhhh! 😉 Chris ( I think GF1 uses 1X per shot )


      • Chris USA

        I put 9 of them on a 11×7 piece of copy paper. And yes I shoot only one shot at each.

        Al I want to do is hit inside the big circle at 50 yards and I’m happy. I already know how my guns group with their favorite pellet.

        One shot one kill. 😉


        • I’m putting 15 in the circles left by the cans on the divider in my 30 pack beverage boxes, they’re white on one side and brown on the other and almost1/8″ thick.


          • Reb
            I use to use them too.

            But them binder circles outside diameter is I believe 9/16″. So if I can stay inside that at 50 yards with taking one shot at that represents under a 1″ kill zone.

            So that means I should be able to hit a starling at 50 yards with ease. I’m not try ing for groups. Each of those 9 binder circles represents a starling if you know what I mean.

            I want to pick my gun up if when one of the real ones show up and know I’m going to hit it.

            I also put the papers out at 15, 25, 35 and 50 yards. So that way I can use my mildot holds at those distances also. That way a starling is going to be in trouble if it lands somewhere in front of me.
            😉


          • Reb,

            Interesting use of “beverage” boxes. Have you found any correlation with accuracy -VS- beverage consumption? While “studies” are underway,….less is better. 😉 Chris


  5. B.B.,

    I’ve enjoyed my all-back version of this Bersa for about a year now, and it reminds me of the CO2 Walther PPK and CP99 Compact in that it is heavy for its tiny size and has a great feel in the hand. I agree that the blowback cycle is short, but mine is POWERFUL. It really bounces in my hand unless I shoot two-handed, which is not my preferred technique. It is a fun blowback. My Bersa definitely comes alive when it is fired. I have never chronied it, but the bouncy blowback gives the impression, perhaps a false one, that it is a little powerhouse. As for the trigger, mine is a bit long and a bit creepy, but it is extremely light.

    A really fun gun to kill pop cans!

    Michael


  6. Quick question, replica-related…

    Is there any way to magnetize the chamber area on the Beretta 84fs? Whether it be at “contact-manetize” , have a small magnet installed by an airgunsmith, or even try to install it myself?
    I just think that may be easier to do than trying to install any type of rubber or soft-plastic retainer in the chamber area.
    The goal is to prevent bb rollout wirhout having to insure that the muzzle does not REQUIRE level or above level attitude when shooting.
    This is only an issue when doing a slow trigger-pull, and while it isn’t very often it IS an often enough occurance to be annoying to me sometimes.
    I immediately identified the cause but not sure of a workable solution (other than the level or positive-angle attitude of the barrel when shooting this gun.
    This is the only that I’had with it and after 200 rounds even the trigger pull has become a little lighter at the break. All-in-all I really DO still like this little gun quite a bit. Kind of reminds me of the Taurus PT99af I had years ago…except it was larger and of course I never had a 9mm fall out of the muzzle 😉

    Denny



      • Think I’ll give a call to the PA tech folks to see what they. Maybe they’ll have an idea or “possibly” have done this before for other similarly designed actions…who knows, but I’ll call them and see.
        I did note this in the “Things I’d Change” part of the review that I wrote fir the this gun… (an 5 star even with thiis ocassional issue), but I really doubt that even if they were to read it that Umarex would say anything about to their manufacturer because they obviously DO sell “as is”.
        Qnyway, rhank you for your reply, and have a good time at the show and on your B-day. 🙂


  7. Denny,

    While having not torn into one, I would think that it would have a magnet already. BB’s falling out would be deal breaker for me. Maybe if it did ever have one, it fell out? As for magnets, there is little “button” magnets that you pick up in the craft section of Wally’s. They are (very) strong. 1/2″ dia. x less than 1/8″ thick. Then there is magnetic tape that you can get in the same area. Generally, it’s very weak. Those little telescopic magnets that you can pick up at auto parts store might work as well. Just some ideas to maybe use as is or modify to work.




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