Dan Wesson model 715 BB revolver: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Dan Wesson BB revolver
Dan Wesson nickel-plated BB revolver.

This report covers:

  • Loading cartridges
  • Features
  • Nickel finish
  • Sights
  • Power
  • Built-in wrench
  • Speedloader included
  • Evaluation so far

Today we begin looking at the new Dan Wesson nickel-plated BB revolver from ASG. This is a replica BB pistol that houses a 12-gram CO2 cartridge in the grip. This one is an accurate copy of a Dan Wesson firearm, just like the Dan Wesson pellet revolver we looked at several weeks ago. Like that gun, this one also uses cartridges, but these load from the front, the same as the cartridges in the other Dan Wesson revolver I tested back in 2011.

Loading cartridges

These cartridges have to be loaded in a certain way, and I will take the time in this report to show you exactly how that should be done. The owner’s manual is very vague about loading the cartridges, so I think this will be time well-spent.

Features

In other respects, this revolver will seem very familiar to those who studied the Dan Wesson pellet revolver I just reviewed. Like that one this revolver has the same cylinder release that a Dan Wesson firearm has. It’s in front of the cylinder on the left side of the gun, and you push down on the button while pressing the cylinder out of the gun from the right.

There is a safety located behind the hammer, in the most unobtrusive place. It’s tiny and difficult to see, yet it works well and is easy to apply and take off. I don’t see how a safety could be any better than this one.

Dan Wesson BB revolver safety off
Safety is off.

 

Dan Wesson BB revolver safety on
Safety is on.

This revolver is heavy. The test gun weighs 2 lbs. 11-3/8 oz. (43-3/8 oz.) with the shells loaded but no CO2 cartridge. The exterior is all metal except for the grips, which are formed from grippy rubber to fit the hand.

The trigger is both double and single action. I will give you a full report on its performance when I test the revolver for velocity.

Nickel finish

The revolver I’m testing is finished in nickel. I’m not a fan of silver guns of any kind, but at least this one has black sights. My objection to silver guns has always been how difficult they are to sight, but my initial examination tells me this one doesn’t have that problem.

Sights

The rear sight is adjustable for elevation and windage. The front sight is a ramp that’s nicely squared off. It appears very sharp in the square rear notch. Here’s hoping this revolver is accurate, because I could do some good work with these sights.

There are two threaded holes on the underside of the barrel lug for attaching a Picatinny rail. This would be for mounting something like a tactical flashlight.

Power

This revolver is rated to shoot 430 f.p.s. with steel BBs. Past experience with Dan Wesson BB revolvers tells us to expect this gun to deliver that number or better. That’s pretty hot, so be sure everyone in the vicinity wears safety glasses when you shoot.

Built-in wrench

Like the pellet revolver, this BB revolver comes with the CO2 piercing wrench built into the left grip panel. It’s exactly where you need it.

Dan Wesson pellet revolver wrench
You’ll never lose your CO2 piercing wrench because it’s inside the left grip panel.

Speedloader included

There is a speedloader included in the box with the revolver. Unless you buy additional BB cartridges, this speedloader isn’t very useful, but as realistic as this revolver is, I bet there will be people who will use it. This Dan Wesson screams to be used in an action pistol event.

Evaluation so far

The Dan Wesson BB revolver is big, heavy and realistic. It’s going to be fun to test. The other Dan Wesson BB revolver was quite accurate, so let’s hope this one is, as well.

27 thoughts on “Dan Wesson model 715 BB revolver: Part 1

  1. Hi BB and the group. No doubt about it , this is a great looking revolver. I like the fact the rear sight will adjust both windage and elevation. Quite a few of my air hand guns have no elevation adjustment. I hope the accuracy will be good on this revolver. Paying a relatively high price for a bb revolver that is not a replica of a vintage hand gun is a bit of a problem for me. I would love to get the Webley MK VI revolver, so that would probably be my next major purchase.
    If this is a good accurate shooter I imagine a lot of Dan Wesson powder burner fans will be interested. Looking forward to the next test.
    Thank you
    H


  2. I’d love to see a non replica co2 pellet revolver, built specifically as a pellet revolver, a narrow, lightweight cylinder taking 12 pellets without cartridges, and Nagant style mechanical sealing to lift velocity with a Lothar barrel., the lighter cylinder offsetting the greater trigger pressure required by the Nagant sealing, 500fps would technically be very possible in a 7″ barrel 22 version., these replica gas pistols have taught us a lot about what makes a good pellet revolver, it would be great to make a purist pellet gun without the unnecessary design required by a centre fire cartridge pressure


    • I agree Dom, I think there would be a demand for such a revolver. I don’t have anything against replicas, I own several, but a quality revolver designed for accuracy and power as well as portability would certainly fill a need.



    • Dom,

      Great ideas and I agree with all of them. Now that “we” have perfected the perfect pellet revolver,….now onto the “looks” dept. 😉 1 addition,…..laser option please! In the grip? With conventional designs, the heavy mass under the barrel could house one also. Just some ideas. Chris


      • I see it looking rather unconventional, there’s never been a pellet revolver before, designed from the ground up without emulation. Probably a fixed cylinder about 10mm thick with a central sprung spigot, a schofield style pivot just in front of tge trigger guard, so you could pivot it forwards to push the pellets into the 12 chambers, a target style grip and overall target styling/anodised. The back strap on the grip would pivot out to hold the co2 capsule and gripping it back into the main grip body will pierce it.
        It would have an open hammer, pulling it back would rotate the cylinder and push it towards the breech as well as cocking the valve….the trigger, though single action will be a two stage adjustable match style unit.


        • Dom,

          You lost me on a couple of those, but overall sounds real good with some rather unique design features.

          What would you price something like that at? What would you pay for something like that? My upper end on a pistol would be 300,…maybe 400.

          500fps. in .22 is really pushing it for C02. That is getting into PCP territory or a nasty little springer or a multi-pump.


          • The 2240B is getting near 450fps with a frankly inefficient breech design by comparison with what I have in mind, and people are tuning them to 500 (and up to 700 with longer barrels)….500fps is technically possible with about 30 shots per caplet, but I’m not talking about a mass market, cheaply made pistol it would have to be a well engineered pistol with a nicely tuned and efficient valve. the frame though could happily be a polymer, if its good enough for. 357 magnum…..
            I would see it at about $300, maybe a little more.



              • An easier way to produce it would plsusibly be with the cylinder towards the rear of the pistol, and doubling as a swappable magazine like a pcp. This would allow a longer barrel and also put thevtrigger group and valve closer to the magazine


                • Dom,

                  All the above sounds very good. I would do 30 per cartridge. I have heard the 2240’s are highly mod-able but have never really checked into it.

                  Now let’s just see if anyone in the mfg. world has there “ears” on. If nothing is “in the pipeline”, then I figure a year or 2 at least. Dream on,….eh?

                  Something like that would be worthy of an extendable butt-stock mod. Scoped? 88-90 tank C02? 😉

                  I like the way you think! Chris


                  • I don’t it will ever happen tbh. Airgun design bravery died in 1905, its been refinements and rehashes ever since. Your great grandpappy could tune a TX200 with the same ease as his Lincoln Jeffries, nothing in it would be the slightest bit unfamiliar.

                    Sadly, the market is in tacticool and looky likeys


  3. Dom and Gerry and whoever else is reading this blog. I think you guys are on to something. Let’s also put on match grade clickable rear sights. If possible, real steel instead of pot metal so we would end up with a nice heirloom revolver to pass down to our heirs . I have only 2 revolvers, a Crosman Vigilante and a Smith & Wesson 327 TRR8. If they manufactured the revolver Dom imagines , it would be unique looking and probably stir up a lot of interest. The possibility of a 22 with 500 fps velocity would interest hunters and while we are at it, put a decent adjustable trigger on it.


  4. B.B.

    I have the earlier Dan Wesson 6″ BB revolver. Besides the new cylinder release, safety, and CO2 piercing wrench, is there anything else different between the two revolvers?

    Are the cartridges the same between the two versions?

    In your accuracy tests, will you possibly do a side-by-side comparison of the two versions?


  5. The Dan Wesson line has always been a little elusive for me although I hear they are good guns. Part of it is confusion with the Smith & Wesson brand. And recently, I found that they have some kind of special relationship with CZ, the Czech company. I suppose that following all of the corporate mergers is futile. And how come this pellet gun has a adjustable sights and my $650 CZ 75 SP-01 does not?

    Mike, you appear to be right about the superiority of the American rifle in the American Revolution. The British army had a rifle unit called the 95th Rifles at Waterloo (dressed in distinctive green jackets) that did some damage, but they were apparently formed out of experience fighting in North America. However since the Napoleonic era, the British have caught up. I understand the term “sniping” is actually British and referred to hunting a particularly small and elusive bird.

    Matt61


  6. Saw Star Wars last night. No spoilers although I will say the lateral flame jets on the evil red lightsaber seem like a good idea. Otherwise, Princess Leia and Han Solo look pretty old putting me in mind of when the original film came out long, long ago. After leaving one showing back then, I heard someone say, referring to all the ray guns, that he thought we were having an energy crisis. Pretty funny. All the high tech makes me wonder if shooting technique is getting obsolete. Apparently breakthroughs have been made for smart bullets both in a sabot form with steerable fins and a more sophisticated design that times the explosion of the projectile with the number of revolutions. And the tracking point smart scopes now seem able to fire the rifle for you. Skilled shooters may be going the way of the English longbow archers unless we find some way to harness the power of the Force.

    Matt61


    • I would think shooting technique could eventually become obsolete, just like driving cars and god knows what else. I think It’s all the more reason though to keep yourself proficient and teach younger people as well. Just think, if the crap ever hits the fan you and those you’ve taught will have an indispensable skill.


  7. This question may have been asked but I’m thinking about buying one of these and I’m curious about something. I noticed that in all the pics/videos I’ve seen, the rear portion of the frame between the cylinder and the hammer just above the hand grips looks realistically sized.

    Does the actual production model of the 715 look like that? I know that on most of the CO2 Dan Wesson’s and Pythons that part of the frame is usually oddly larger than it should be. What I’m asking is a bit tough to describe so I hope all that makes sense.


  8. Hi B.B.,

    I hope this new year is off to a good start for you. Off topic question — how do you find pricing for a “somewhat” older air gun? I saw a RWS Model 48 in a local store and am wondering how to value it. It is stamped with “04 98” as the date of manufacture. I’m not sure exactly what all the criteria are for evaluation, but my amateur eye would say it’s about 70 – 75% condition. I do have an online subscription to the Blue Book, but I can’t seem to find a value for a Model 48 of that year — or close enough to there to extrapolate well.

    Thanks!

    Jim M.


Leave a Reply