Sig Sauer P320 M17 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig M17 pellet pistol
Sig Sauer P320 M17 pellet pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Correction
  • Sig wonders why we want to disassemble the gun
  • The test
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Rifled barrel
  • Magazine gas loss
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • Crux Ballistic Alloy
  • Blowback
  • Trigger pull
  • Daisy BBs
  • Smart Shot a no go
  • Beeman Perfect Rounds
  • Shot count
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the Sig P320 M17 pellet pistol. But there will be more to this test than just three pellets. Because readers wondered if it could also shoot BBs and I learned that it can, I will test them, as well. As long as I’m testing BBs, I will test lead balls of differing sizes, because when we get to the accuracy test I’ll want to test them as well.

Correction

I told you in the last part that the magazine cap has to be removed to insert a CO2 cartridge. That was incorrect. Just remove the mag from the gun and insert the cartridge by following the directions in the manual. Leave the cap alone. read more


How the Price-Point PCP (PPP) has changed the face of the airgun world

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gauntlet
Umarex’s Gauntlet was the first PPP to be announced, but several others beat it to the marketplace.

This report covers:

  • Gauntlet dropped!
  • For Hank
  • For the manufacturers
  • What is a PPP?
  • Cost
  • Required features
  • Nice features to have
  • Caliber
  • ALL BOATS ARE FLOATED!
  • Compressors
  • Other PCPs
  • Sig
  • AirForce Airguns
  • On and on
  • Summary

Gauntlet dropped!

When Umarex announced the new Gauntlet air rifle the savvy airgunning world was stunned. A precharged pneumatic (PCP) that was a repeater, was shrouded with an active silencer, had an adjustable trigger and stock, was accurate and came with a regulator — all for less than $300. They named it appropriately, because it was a huge gauntlet to drop on the airgun community. I’m sure this is exactly what Umarex had in mind, though the particulars of how it has and still is unfolding I’m sure have been as much of a surprise to them as they have been to others. read more


Sig Sauer P320 M17 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig M17 pellet pistol
Sig Sauer P320 M17 pellet pistol.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Action
  • Sights
  • Light rail
  • Holsters
  • Disassembly
  • Installing CO2
  • Removing and installing the magazine
  • Manual
  • Works with BBs
  • Summary

Just a reminder that I’m in the hospital today, so I can’t answer questions. Hopefully I will be back home sometime tomorrow.

This is the completion of my description of the new Sig P320 M17 pellet pistol. Now I need to explain something. This pellet pistol is marked M17 — not P320 M17. Sig calls it the P320 M17, so it is correctly identified both here and on the Pyramyd Air website. But I told you that I bought the P320 M17 firearm, and it is marked with both numbers. Let me show you.

Sig M17 pellet pistol markings
On the top left of the slide the pellet pistol is just marked M17. This is also how the Army sidearm is marked. read more


Sig Sauer P320 M17 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig M17 pellet pistoll
Sig Sauer P320 M17 pellet pistol.

This report covers:

  • M17 differences
  • M17 pellet pistol
  • My grand plan
  • What’s up?
  • Lookalikes are coming to the top
  • Back to the M17 pellet pistol
  • Operation
  • Disassembly
  • Same heft
  • Summary

To all our American readers I want to wish a very happy Thanksgiving. Now, on to today’s report.

On January 19, 2017 it was announced that the U.S. Army had selected the Sig Sauer P320 pistol for their new Modular Handgun System. The full-sized gun is called the M17 and the carry-sized weapon is the M18. The rest of the U.S. armed forces also have or will have this sidearm. The nominal caliber for the U.S. military is the 9X19mm pistol cartridge that is best-known as the 9mm Luger.

M17 differences

The M17 is not just a P320 by a different name. The Army specified certain performance requirements for their pistol and they require Sig to maintain a strict separation in their plants between Army contract guns and similar civilian guns. This not only covers the finished guns but also all parts. read more


Diana Chaser air pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Diana Chaser air pistol
The Diana Chaser is a new CO2 pistol.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Qiang Yuan Match pellets
  • Adjusted the sights
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Pellets jamming
  • Trigger pull changed
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • RWS Superdome
  • The magazine
  • Open sights visible?
  • RWS Superdomes through the magazine
  • Discussion
  • Surprise!

Today is accuracy day for the Diana Chaser air pistol. I threw in some extra tests just for fun. This should be interesting, so let’s go!

The test

I shot off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. I used the single shot tray for the first 4 groups, then switched to the magazine for the final group. There were some interesting results that I couldn’t have predicted.

Qiang Yuan Match pellets

I shot the first group with Qiang Yuan Match pellets. No particular reason for that, other than I had them ready. They hit the target low and to the left, but I left the sights where they were and shot all 10 pellets. They landed in a group that measures 1.052-inches between centers. This was larger than I had hoped for the Chaser. read more


Diana Chaser air pistol: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Diana Chaser air pistol
The Diana Chaser is a new CO2 pistol.

This report covers:

  • Trigger
  • Piercing the CO2 cartridge
  • RWS Hobby
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • JSB Exact 8.44-grain dome
  • Cocking
  • Shot count
  • Report
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today is the day we find out about the velocity of the Diana Chaser air pistol. There are a couple other things to learn today, as well. Let’s go.

Trigger

The first thing I wanted to know was whether that trigger really is adjustable. So I got a fine Allen wrench and started adjusting. Turning the screw in the trigger blade counterclockwise did nothing at all. The pull remained where it was — two stage and around 4 lbs.

Then I turned it in — clockwise. Bingo! I got to the point that the gun couldn’t be cocked. That tells me the trigger is adjustable and also that the adjustment works on the sear contact area. I had to back the screw out several turns and then I got a single-stage trigger that fired at 8 ounces. That’s FAR TOO LIGHT for an inexpensive direct sear! I kept turning and testing until I got a great 2-stage pull. Stage one is 12 ounces and stage two breaks cleanly at 2 lbs. 4 oz. The trigger can’t be “bumped off” which is important for a light trigger — especially one that has a direct sear adjustment. I’m staying where I am. read more


Diana Chaser air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Chaser air pistol
The Diana Chaser is a new CO2 pistol.

This report covers:

  • Chaser rifle
  • Crosman challenge!
  • The pistol
  • Grip is off
  • The bolt
  • CO2 chamber
  • More CO2
  • HOWEVER
  • Sights
  • Composition
  • Trigger
  • Bag
  • Evaluation
  • Summary

Okay, Bob, this one’s for you! Several readers have asked me to test the new Diana Chaser air pistol, but my brother-in-law, Bob, has been the most vocal. Not that he wants to buy a pistol — he is interested in the Diana Chaser air rifle that is built on the same frame. Today I’m starting the test of a .177-caliber Diana Chaser air pistol. Both the rifle and pistol come in .177 or .22 caliber.

Chaser rifle

The Chaser rifle comes with everything you need to convert it into a Chaser pistol. The owner’s manual describes how that is done. At this time I think that is the only way you can go. I don’t see the parts needed to convert the pistol into the rifle. So, the rifle and pistol combination together seems like the better deal than just the pistol by itself. Unless price is an issue. Give that some thought before you buy either gun. read more