Webley Mark VI service revolver with battlefield finish: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Webley Mark VI
Webley Mark VI service revolver with battlefield finish. This one is rifled and shoots pellets.

This report covers:

  • Long time coming
  • Some history
  • The pellet gun
  • Realism
  • CO2
  • Sights
  • Weight
  • Flies in the ointment
  • Lookalike airguns
  • A brief tutorial
  • Summary

Long time coming

Sometimes I wait a long time to start a report. Today is one such time. This report on the Webley Mark VI with battlefield finish began back in June of 2018, at the Texas Airgun Show. A reader came to my table and talked about the Mark VI pellet revolver with a battlefield finish. We went outside to talk, and by the time we finished I was the proud owner of a .455-caliber Mark VI revolver! I have shown you that gun in the past.

Webley
I showed this .455 Mark VI revolver back in July of 2018. This is the revolver I acquired at the show. It was made in 1916. read more


Treasure of the pond

by Tom Gaylord

A history of airguns

This is a special day. You will notice that I did not use my pen name today.

I’m showing you the first chapter in my next book. My last book was BB Guns Remembered, which is a collection of short stories I wrote about vintage pictures of boys with BB guns. I make nearly $100 a year from the online sales of that book, which beats the thousands I lost on the R1 book. So, I obviously don’t do this for money. I do it for fun. Have some fun on me this weekend!

boy dog gun

My gosh! I never looked that clean a day in my life! I had to take a bath and get on my best summer clothes for that picture. See those shoes? Never wore them in the summer, except to church. And the hat? Not on your life! It made me look like a girl. read more


Crosman’s Mark I Target pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman Mark I
Crosman Mark I target pistol.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Mark II
  • The pistol
  • Two power levels
  • Grips
  • Sights
  • The trigger
  • Power
  • The pinnacle of its time
  • Ergonomics
  • Modified guns
  • How long do they hold?
  • Summary

I wanted to write about the Crosman Mark I target pistol today, but was afraid I might have reported on it too many times in the recent past. However, when I looked, I discovered that I have never fully tested this airgun for you! I wrote about it back in 2005 and re-ran that report in July of 2015, but apparently I’ve never gone all the way and done a complete test. That ends today.

History

The .22 caliber Mark I Target pistols were made by Crosman from 1966 to 1983. In 1980 Crosman removed the power adjustment capability from the gun, so those made from ’66 to ’80 are called the first variation, while those made from ’80 to ’83 without power adjustment are called the second variation. The first variation guns are considered more desirable, only because of the additional feature of power adjustment. read more


The way of airguns

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • What makes an airgun good?
  • A few good airguns — rifles
  • Challenger and Edge
  • A few good airguns — air pistols
  • Beeman P17
  • Summary

I’m writing this on Christmas Day and don’t want to do another test today. I thought about airguns this morning and came up with some interesting thoughts.

What makes an airgun good?

I used to think accuracy was the only requirement for an airgun to be good but now I realize it’s so much more.

A few good airguns — rifles

Going back a couple years, I was able to purchase a Beeman R10/HW85 that Bryan Enoch had tuned. I had seen and shot that air rifle several years earlier, at the Arkansas airgun show in Malvern. After just a few shots I gave Bryan one of those, “If you ever want to sell this…” requests. To my surprise, this one paid off. I was able to buy it at the 2017 Texas Airgun Show. read more


Sig Sauer P320 M17 CO2 pellet pistol: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sig M17 pellet pistol
Sig Sauer P320 M17 pellet pistol.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Group 2
  • Remember what we are doing
  • Lead pellets
  • Back to the test
  • Two hands wins!
  • Other pellets
  • Let’s try BBs
  • 4.55mm lead balls
  • Wild shots explained?
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I shoot the Sig P320 M17 pellet pistol for accuracy. I learned a lot in today’s test, so this should be interesting.

The test

I am testing both pellets and BBs (plus lead balls), so I will test at two different distances. I will begin with pellets at 10 meters. I knew that Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets would be accurate, so I started with them.

I started the test by shooting off a sandbag rest. I rested the bottom of the gun’s grip on the bag and I also tried holding the gun with my hands resting on the bag. It turned out that resting the pistol directly on the bag worked the best, but I had to shoot a second group to learn that. read more


An American Zimmerstutzen: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

American Zimmerstutzen
What in the world is this?

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The puzzle
  • Gold?
  • On to the next supposition
  • Few gun parts
  • Discussion
  • Busy box
  • Summary

The puzzle

Reader August figured out the main piece of the puzzle, when he discovered that the inscription on the large medallion is from the Trenton Watch Company. Actually, that was all you needed to know to know that none of the medallions on this gun are gold. No tests are needed, because in the watch industry, the words “Warranted 10 years” are industry code for heavy gold electroplate. Another term is gold-filled. They all mean electroplated. Electroplate means plated with gold — not solid gold. Any pawnshop owner or worker in the world should know that. Therefore, the pawn shop that listed this on Gun Broker and used the tag as one of their pictures, was clearly misleading potential buyers. New reader Mudflap was the first to catch that. read more


An American Zimmerstutzen: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

American Zimmerstutzen
What in the world is this?

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Firearm
  • Hand made
  • Covered in “charms”
  • How does it work?
  • Where are we going with this?
  • Summary

Today I have something so strange there are no words for it. I titled this report, An American Zimmerstutzen, simply because Whatizit wouldn’t attract many readers. But that’s what I wanted to call it. What in the world is this strange little gun and why does it even exist?

American Zimmerstutzen size
It’s not that big, as the Red Ryder shows.

Firearm

First, this is a firearm. It uses .22 caliber blank cartridges to launch what I was told are .22 caliber lead pellets. That won’t work very well because .22 caliber pellets are not really .22 caliber. More on that later. read more