They overstepped the line!

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

  • What “they” did
  • Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation
  • Young minds go astray
  • Bad ideas abound!
  • Percussion cap guns
  • What about cartridge primers?
  • Summary

What “they” did

The history of airguns is fascinating to those who enjoy applied creativity. But sometimes when creativity is carried too far it becomes a liability. And that’s the case with today’s guns.

Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation

In the 1970s the Rocky Mountain Arms Corporation (RMAC) created a little gun for kids who wanted to shoot with their fathers. They referred to it as a .22 caliber, though it shot a number 4 buckshot that is really 0.24 inches rather than 0.223 inches in diameter. That didn’t matter because a 5-pound bag number 4 buckshot was available for a few dollars. For that you got thousands of shots.  Nobody worried about the size of the ball that much.

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HW 35 Luxus: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

HW35
HW35 Luxus.

This report covers:

  • Barrel droop
  • First pellet
  • Next pellets
  • Bottom line

Before I begin, I must tell you that my wife, Edith, passed away yesterday, Sunday, July 26 at 10 a.m., Central. She was under sedation and unaware of what was happening.

Edith
Edith Gaylord will be missed.

Edith wanted me to tell you what happened. We actually talked about it last week. I am not in a frame of mind to write much these days, but I promised her the blog would carry on. Those of you who visit my socnets could help me by posting a comment regarding this, because I haven’t got the time to go there.

I said I would come back to this rifle and mount a scope because so many of you asked me to. Today is the day.

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2015 Malvern airgun show: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • My HW35
  • Hannusch display
  • Early BSA Airsporter
  • A missed deal
  • HW85
  • USFT
  • Vulcan
  • Other guns
  • Summary

I made part 1 of the report on the Malvern airgun show about the 3 new products I saw. I did that because I’ve never seen 3 entirely new products at an airgun show before. I have plans to test each of these for you, because I think they’re all very important to the future of airguns.

Today, I want to tell you about the regular things that went on at this show. I will talk about the guns I saw and shot and some of the people I got to meet and know. Because Malvern is a small show, it does give you a chance to meet and talk to people. I had more people introduce themselves and tell me they read this blog or watched American Airgunner than at any other show I’ve attended. That’s nice, and I think it indicates that the airgun community here in the United States is beginning to open up. People are no longer surprised by what modern airguns can do.

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2015 Malvern airgun show: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Layers of intrigue
  • Seth’s bullets
  • Rocket Shot
  • AirForce Airguns Texan big bore air rifle
  • Dennis Quackenbush
  • Mike Melick
  • Pellet Head Gauge
  • RAI
  • WOW!

Malvern is a show that has evolved over the years. Originally, it was the Little Rock, Arkansas, show and was held in Benton, Arkansas, inside an empty mall building for many years. Then, it moved a few miles to the west to the county fairgrounds for several more years before the promoter decided to give up the show.

Layers of intrigue

Seth Rowland, who makes bullets for big bore hunters, took over promoting the show and moved it to the old country fairgrounds in Malvern, Arkansas, about 20 miles further west on Interstate 30. Of all the airgun shows being held, Malvern is the smallest and the quietest, but it’s also one that has many surprises every year. This year, I’ll say that I saw layers of intrigue to the show. That’s what I’ll discuss today.

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Buying and selling airguns on the internet: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

• The shyster dealers
• Weasel wording
• Bad photos
• How to spot an honest dealer
• Honest vs. dishonest: What’s the verdict?

The shyster dealers
Today, let’s start out talking about those internet dealers who are less than honest. I’m not talking about the scammers who are certainly out there. They’re the people with nothing at all to sell. All they want is for you to send them money, and you’ll never hear from them again.

I’m talking about the dealers who do anything to mislead you about the real airguns they’re selling. They have actual guns to sell, but they describe them in dishonest ways. I’ve dealt with a few and discovered a great many others, so this should be interesting. Remember, I’m primarily talking about buying guns on the Gun Broker website, though this does apply to most websites where selling takes place.

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Buying and selling airguns on the internet: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

• Tip 1: Commonly misspelled names
• Tip 2: Use an adjective
• Back to airguns
• Tip 3: What’s in a name?
• More

I’m going to address a question that several readers have asked about: How to buy used and vintage airguns over the internet. I’ve wanted to write this series for some time now. While I titled it “…on the internet,” a lot of what I’m going to say applies directly to Gun Broker — a large auction website. I use a tablet to browse this site anytime I am away from my desk and, shall we say, otherwise occupied? That time adds up for an old man!

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The American Boy Scout Remington rifle

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

American Boy Scout rifle
American Boy Scout rifle.

This report covers:

• History of the American Boy Scouts
• Remington rifle chosen
• Why a bayonet?
• Features of the rifle
• How it shoots
• How was the rifle used?
• Pyramyd Air Cup

And now for something entirely different, yet surprisingly similar.

History of the American Boy Scouts
In 1907, Lieutenant General Baden-Powell held the Brownsea Island scout camp, which is considered the start of the Boy Scouts. In February 8, 1910, American publisher W.D. Boyce founded the Boy Scouts of America, inspired by and based on the British Boy Scouts and with the blessing of Baden-Powell. The organization has grown to be a large and successful one that has touched the lives of many men in the United States.

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