Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver
The new Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver comes in both silver and black. I’m testing a silver gun.

This report covers:

  • Eye-opener!
  • Lothar Walther barrel
  • Loading the pellets
  • Velocity
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • RWS Superdome pellets
  • Conclusion
  • Shot count
  • Trigger-pull

Eye-opener!

I got an eye-opener in today’s test of the Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver! I had selected my ammo and was all set to start the test when it dawned on me that this gun doesn’t shoot BBs! I had selected 3 different BBs to shoot in this pellet revolver! That’s how strange it seems to be loading lead pellets into an inexpensive airgun revolver.

Lothar Walther barrel

The second eye-opener came from an alert blog reader who mentioned that these Gletcher revolvers have rifled barrels made by Lothar Walther. Yeah, right, I thought. Then, on checking their website, I discovered that it’s true. I don’t expect them to be match barrels, but all the barrels Lothar Walther makes are pretty good. So, chalk that up in the plus column.

Loading the pellets

I discovered right away that I couldn’t just press the pellets into the plastic bushing in the cartridge base with my thumb. The first pellet I loaded backed out and jammed the cylinder as I was turning it to load the next cartridge, so I stopped and deep-seated every pellet with the Air Venturi Pellet Pen. I’m sure you can get away by seating some pellets without a seater, but since the very first pellet jammed, I decided to deep-seat all the pellets in this test.

Velocity

That brings us to the velocity test. Gletcher advertises this pellet-firing revolver at 328 f.p.s. We discovered they seriously understated the velocity of their Nagant BB revolver, which they also rated at 328 f.p.s. In my test, I saw it go up to 403 f.p.s. I suspected that this pellet revolver would be faster than stated, as well.

Since the revolver is both single-action and double-action, I tested each pellet both ways. We’ll start with the RWS Hobby pellet, which is a lightweight lead wadcutter. I shot 7 shots for the record and waited 10 seconds between shots. In single-action, the Hobby averages 406 f.p.s. The low was 394 f.p.s., and the high was 426 f.p.s. That’s 98 feet per second faster than advertised!

In double-action, I also shot just 7 shots that averaged 374 f.p.s. The low was 357 f.p.s., and the high was 398 f.p.s. So, the gun is a little slower in double-action. Yes, I waited 10 seconds between these shots, as well.

H&N Finale Match Pistol

Next up were H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets. They’re heavier than Hobbys, at 7.56 grains, as opposed to 7 grains for the Hobbys, but that didn’t slow them very much. In single-action, they averaged 404 f.p.s with a low of 388 and a high of 425 f.p.s.

In double-action, these pellets were also slower, at an average 378 f.p.s. The low was 369 and the high was 398 f.p.s.

RWS Superdomes

The last pellets I tested were some 8.3-grain RWS Superdomes. At that weight, they may be as heavy as you should go in this revolver. They averaged 351 f.p.s. in single-action. The low was 333, and the high was 367 f.p.s.

In double-action, they averaged 341 f.p.s. The low was 329, and the high was 351 f.p.s.

Conclusion

The Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver is MUCH more powerful (faster) than advertised. It also held its power through the first 42 shots — which we just examined. Now, I pushed it for the shot count on one CO2 cartridge.

Shot count

I used H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets for this. At shot 50, the pellet was still coming out at 390 f.p.s. in single-action. Shot 60 went out at 360 f.p.s., also single-action, so that’s where all liquid CO2 was gone and the gun was running on residual gas, alone.

Shot 70 went out at 309 f.p.s., which I note is just under the velocity advertised by Gletcher. Shots 81, 82 and 83 went out at 259, 248 and 236 f.p.s., respectively. So, you better stop shooting after the 10th cylinder if you don’t want to risk jamming the barrel.

Trigger-pull

The double-action trigger-pull is 10 lbs., 11 oz, which is light for a double-action revolver. There’s a hesitation at the start of the pull then the hammer comes back and stacks at the end of the pull. I don’t think I’ll shoot the gun for accuracy in double-action; but if that’s your thing, this is a good gun for it.

On single-action, the trigger breaks at 5 lbs., 1 oz. and the release is very crisp. I would be happy to have such a trigger on any revolver — firearm or airgun.

That’s it for today. I can’t wait to test the accuracy. As I said, today’s test was a pleasant surprise.

56 thoughts on “Gletcher Nagant pellet revolver: Part 2


  1. Now a bunch of us are waiting for the accuracy test. So far, the pistol looks great. I like the velocity
    and number of useable shots. Thanks BB for the report.


  2. Harvey
    Just what I was thinking. I like the way they designed the gun.

    And I’m waiting patiently for the accuracy test also.

    I’m not much of a pistol shooter but I do like this one. And the Lothar Walther barrel that shoots a pellet even interests me more.


    • Gunfun1, As I have stated before, relatively new airgunner. I have a Ruger Single Six in 22lr and magnum. I very seldom shoot it as it feels clumsy in my hand. I have the Crosman Vigilante which also feels clumsy compared to most of my CO2 semi-automatics. It the accuracy pans out in this pistol, may be a alternative I could use to get used to revolvers. I have read where BB prefers revolvers to semi-automatics, but yet, he is a whiz with the Colt 1911 . So I continue to read and learn from you all.


      • Harvey
        Well BB is the one to learn from for pistols for sure.

        My brother has pistols and through the years I have shot his. But just can’t get with the program with them. Now give me a rifle and that’s another story. I much more comfortable shooting a rifle than a pistol.

        But so far this pistol seems to be looking like it will be a winner.


  3. Hi B.B.: I have a Gletcher SW R25 pellet revolver that uses what I believe are the same cartridges that the Nagent pellet revolver uses. Upon contacting Gletcher, a representative told me that the “bullet” part of the cartridge is to be pulled off and a pellet is placed inside (with the proper orientation, of course). This is unlike the similar BB cartridges where you just press the BB into the bullet part from the outside. With constant use, I was concerned about damaging the o-rings that provide the seals for the bullet/cartridge, so I put a little dab of Pellgun Oil on the o-rings every so often — seems to work well. It’s too bad that that Pyramyd has a difficult time stocking these cartridges, so I’m on the e-mail notification list for now. Thanks for all the valuable information you share with us and looking forward to seeing you at the 2nd Annual Pyramyd Cup in September!


  4. I thought I would sell my bb Gletcher Nagant once I got hold of this pellet version, thinking that I would prefer just to keep the more accurate rifled barrel revolver. But then, I tested the pellet cartridges in the bb gun and discovered that they fit perfectly. This gave me the option to load airgun darts (the short soft hair flechette type) in the smoothbore bb revolver. It works without a hitch! Also gave me the idea of possibly loading the pellet cartridges with birdshot one of these days. Because of this ammo versatility, I’ve decided to keep the bb Gletcher Nagant. Just have to wait until more pellet cartridges are available so I can experiment some more with ammo.

    These airgun ammo cartridges are a good idea. They could actually come up with ejecting lever action rifles using these. They already have shell ejecting airsoft guns like the ASG CZ 75 and the D Boys Kar 98 Mauser.

    I am also wondering why they don’t come up with inexpensive plastic or paper disposable cartridges that you won’t regret losing too much, and can recycle after a few uses. Much like the reloadable Viper Express shotshells. The metal ones are too expensive to lose track of.



    • B.B> and Lioniii,

      There is a fellow who has a video online in which he shoots lead pellets loaded into his Umarex Colt SAA. I forget whether he loads the pellets into the cartridges from the rear or from the front skirt-first (tricky, but that’s how it is done with the old Crosman Peacemakers, except straight into the front of the cylinder and no cartridge).

      Regardless, and despite the lack of rifling, the pellets are more accurate than the BBs in the SAA. Well, a badminton shuttlecock has a lot of stability in the air, and that is the same shape as a diabolo pellet.

      Michael



  5. It’s nice to see a manufacturer reporting conservative velocity figures, instead of the fastest single velocity ever recorded with an alloy pellet!


    • HS,

      That’s one way to look at it, but from a product liability standpoint, it’s the wrong way. If the manufacturer understates the power they are failing to warn their customers of what a gun could potentially do. That is why the fastest possible velocity has become the industry standard — not for bragging rights.

      However, when a company overstates the possible velocity — that IS for bragging rights.

      B.B.



  6. In my post on Part 1 I mentioned not wanting to be a spoiler by posting the velocity readings from my Nagant, and now I see that your readings are the same as mine.



  7. B.B. and Everyone who discussed other potential military CO2 guns a short while ago,

    I discovered that GSG/Cybergun makes (or at least used to make) an all metal and wood, CO2 powered AK-47 with blowback that shot steel BBs and had select fire.

    Michael



    • Saw a British video showing one. Looks like they basically modify an AK with a unit that contains the firing mechanism as well as the bbs and co2 in an ak 30 round mag. They shouuld sell it here. Looks like the mechanism could be adapted to other rifles like a German MP 40, US Grease gun and M 1 Carbine


  8. Loving it so far! If this thing turns out to be accurate, It’s a hands down winner. Then I’ll be yelling at Umarex to come out with the Colt SAA that fires pellets and has a Lothar Walther barrel! Can’t wait to see part 3. Thanks B.B.


  9. Are pellet revolvers that unusual? My Walther CPSport and Crosman 1077 both use pellets in a revolver mechanism and they work great. Interesting that anyone would put quality into an obscure firearm like this. I only know of Nagant revolvers, not necessarily this model. They seem to have had solid though undistinguished careers. Otherwise, they seemed to have some odd mechanism for sealing the cartridges into the breech, but nothwithstanding, I believe that they had the usual Russian reliability. Where did this airgun come from?…

    Fred DPRONJ, I had a look at the Sean Connery photos last night, and you are right. That is definitely an airgun he is holding. That series got away with some strange things in the realm of firearms. You may recall in From Russia With Love where he is being chased by a helicopter. He dives behind a rock, assembles a rifle and shoots down the helicopter. Turns out that his super sniper-rifle was an AR-7 survival rifle in .22 LR! Granted that he shot down the helicopter by shooting someone holding a grenade which then exploded. Still, I don’t know what else he was planning to do with that caliber. Perhaps the most unique gun in the whole series was from the film The Man With the Golden Gun. As i recall from long ago, this gun can be assembled out of parts disguised as other things like cigarette lighters and pens. Any idea what gun this is? I think this is one of the lesser-known Bond films where he disguises himself with cosmetic surgery involving a third nipple!?

    Otherwise, I have to back off on my thesis about the superiority of earlier peoples. While reviewing more early James Bond films the other night, I see that the hand-to-hand combat is very crude. The current standard of Bond films and the Bourne series is way better.

    Matt61


    • Matt 61,

      The pistol that Scaramanga used in the man with the golden gun, wasnt based on an existing model….. it was a prop gun. In fact…..there were 3 different golden pistols used during the movie shoot:
      No1 : that pistol was used in (dis) assembley scenens
      No2: the robust pistol…. this one was used for the action scenes
      No3: this gun was used for firing scenes.
      Cheers, dutchjozef


    • I saw a video of an Umarex showing the new Umarex peacemaker. He was asked why not a pellet version. He stated they had looked at both ,but the bb version actually proved to be more accurate.


      • Michaelr,

        Thanks for the info regarding the AK.

        As for the BB/Smoothbore being more accurate than the lead pellet/rifled bore, the key is RANGE. At 5 meters there is not really much of an advantage with rifling and lead ammo. But stretch that out to just 7 meters, and the difference beins to appear. At 10 meters, there is no way the smoothbore BB caliber will be as accurate as (everything else being identical) a rifled bore with lead diabolo pellet. At 25 yards the difference is ridiculous. A lead pellet-firing-rifled bore airgun will produce actual groups at 25 yards. A BB gun with the same velocity will simply spray all over and around the target. An Umarex SAA with rifled barrel shooting lead domed diabolo pellets probably would get you 4-6 inch groups at 25 yards. The same but smoothbore BBS? Probably 25-40 inch “groups.”

        Michael


        • Umarex rep didn’t state the range , but I would expect a rifled barrel to be more accurate. That being said I gave a Peacemaker to my friend as a present ,and he was consitently hitting the cross bar of a cyclone fence at over 25 yards. My suggestion to Umarex would be to do an 1860 Army pellet revolver ,loading the pellets from the front like the old crosman single action ,but actually using a rammer like a percussion revolver. Hopefully the Peacemaker will be available in other variations including a pellet version.



            • You would think. The market is there. I also think they should look at resurrecting older guns with newer mechanics. A revolver looking like the old Crosman version of the K frame 38 6inch model 14 and the 4 inch model 19 but with better seals ,and a swing out , cartridge loading cylinder would be nice ,as would a new version of the old 600 semiauto, but with clip feeding from the grip frame. There is nothing along the lines of the old 600. A powerful brute. Mine has been revalved ,and goes hits around 500fps. Could see a new version hitting 600, which would make it a true model 600. A pellet firing version of the new WEbley mark VI would also be welcomed. How about a pellet firing pocket pistol along the lines of the PPK? A pellet firing P08?



  10. I’m not really one for pistols or Co2…but this little thing is starting to knock on the door of 2/40 velocities, now lets see if that moving barrel that is giving the sealing and providing the shot count and velocity, has enough lock up to use the Lothar barrel effectively.
    I would love to see a CO2 or PCP revolver designed from the ground up without a nod to a firearm..the rotating cylinder wouldn’t have to be the weight to take a cartridge allowing a much lighter and smoother takeup, the pellets could be a direct fit close to the breech, which could move back in this fashion to provide sealing. Provide it in the more efficient 22 cal as an option and you could easily make a 50 shot, 7fpe, accurate little garden rat gun


  11. Edith,

    Logged in and posted 2 replies to Dom. No post. No biggie, just thought you should know. Was logged in both times from previous post, today.. Maybe something to do with the new “system”. 3rd. worked. No reply needed.

    Thanks, Chris




  12. B.B.,

    I noticed above in Jeff E’s post that P.A. sells the shells for the Gletcher SW R25 pellet revolver. I checked and see that they do sell those but they do not carry the gun. What’s up with that? Seems kind of odd to sell the ammo and not the gun.

    G&G


  13. I like the look of those Gletcher pellet cartridge shells but they are “out of stock”. The Gletcher pellet revolvers looked very much like the Dan Wesson guns. I’m assuming these cartridge shells would work in them too. I hope
    Pyramyd will eventually stock them.

    Probably some kind of marketing exclusivity / licensing agreement glitch that pulled the pellet revolvers out of the Gletcher product line. The thing is however, Gletcher’s CLT bb revolver series look very much like the Colt Python and Swiss Arms bb revolvers, but they haven’t been pulled out from either Gletcher’s and Pyramid’s product line.


Leave a Reply