The Ultra-Reliable air rifle

by B.B. Pelletier

Pyramyd Air Garage Sale!
Don’t forget, all of you who live within striking distance of Bedford Heights (Cleveland), Ohio, that this Saturday and Sunday is the Pyramyd Air garage sale! It’s everything you could ever imagine would be possible in a huge airgun dealership! Stuff has been discovered in out-of-the-way places, there are returned guns to pick through, scratch ‘n’ dents to ponder and all with the convenience of credit-card shopping and shipping for those flying in. If you’ve ever wanted to pick through a pile of airguns, this is your chance!

Ultra-Reliable air rifle
In the past two days, I have received two comments that have pushed me into today’s subject. The first was from a reader who wanted an R7 but wondered if the power could be tweaked up just a bit. My response was that the R7 isn’t easy to boost, but it’s probably possible. Then I told him that if the power could be boosted to 800 f.p.s. in .177, the resulting gun would probably no longer be the R7 he loved. It would certainly be harder to cock, and the recoil and possibly even vibration that would result from such a fire-breathing modification would probably spoil the shooting experience for him.

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HW 55 Tyrolean – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


HW 55T is an all-time classic air rifle.


The deeply cupped cheekpiece is the Tyrolean signature. It positions your eye for the sights.


The lever locks the breech after closing. All HW 55 rifles have it except the rare SF models. Push forward to unlock the breech and backwards after loading.

Let’s take a look at a classic air rifle that captures the heart of most collectors whenever they see it. We have reader Wayne of the Ashland Air Rifle Range to thank for this report, because he graciously sent his rifle to me for testing; in return, I offered to tune it up and to give the rest of you a look at the inner workings of a fine spring-piston powerplant. This report will be a long one for two good reasons. First, I’ll be testing the rifle both before and after the tuneup; and during the tuneup, I’ll show you the guts of the gun. Second, I’m hoping that the longer I drag this out the less attached Wayne will be to his rifle, giving me time to find the means to wrest it away from him. Please don’t tell him I said that!

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BSF S20 Match – Part 3 Germany’s rifle-pistol

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Today, we’ll test the accuracy of this BSF rifle-pistol.

I decided on a 10-yard indoor test. I used a rest, resting my forearms on a bag and holding the pistol with two hands just in front of the bag. The hold was steady, but the post-and-bead front sight made it difficult to acquire a precise picture. Posts and beads are better for hunting or shooting cans and are not well-suited to holding at arms-length.

Surprise!
When I was testing the Air Venturi Avenger 1100 for yesterday’s blog, I read in the owner’s manual that they recommended using a Crosman 850 pellet trap for the rifle. I wrote a whole paragraph of criticism about that, because I felt the trap was built too light for such a powerful rifle; but my wife, who is both my editor and my conscience, called me on it. So, we went to the garage, and I shot a Crosman Premier 10.5-grain Premier into the trap from a foot away. I felt certain the pellet would deeply dent the steel backplate, but it didn’t even make a mark. So, we erased the entire paragraph, and on this day I used the same trap for the BSF S20 Match. It’s a fairly quiet trap and I envision using it a lot more in the future.

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Air Venturi Avenger 1100 Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier


The Air Venturi’s Avenger 1100 is a big spring rifle for not a lot of money.

Today, we’ll begin looking at a .177-caliber Air Venturi Avenger 1100 rifle. This is a breakbarrel spring piston rifle made by Mendoza. It’s a single-shot, and is one of the most powerful rifles Mendoza makes. The advertised velocity is 1030 f.p.s., which we’ll certainly test.

My test rifle has a different stock than the one shown on the website. Mine is plain instead of being checkered on both the grip and forearm, and the stain on my rifle is a lighter brown than you see here. My stock also lacks the sling swivel stud that appears in the photo on the toe of the butt. Other that that, the two rifles appear the same. The reason my rifle is different is because the new-style stock just came in recently, and the one I’m testing was ordered when Pyramyd Air had the plain stocks. I want to draw your attention to the shape of the stock at the cheekrest. The groove that is supposed to define the pistol grip is cut higher up on the cheekrest of this rifle. Also, the toe of the stock is swooped up instead of following the line of the stock bottom. It makes the butt appear very Bavarian. The wood appears to be beech with very little figure.

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BSF S20 Match – Part 2 Germany’s rifle-pistol

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

In the first report, I told you something of the history of the BSF S20 Match pistol but not everything. The gun I own doesn’t actually say BSF on it. It was exported by Wischo, a company that was also headquartered in Erlangen, the home of BSF. Like RWS, Wischo didn’t make airguns. They put their name on guns made by several other European makers, with BSF among them.

My pistol was purchased from Air Rifle Headquarters; and all the BSF guns they sold, at the time this gun was purchased, came through Whisco. It may seem like trivia unless you’re searching for a certain model. Then, knowing the other players is important–like the names Hy Score, Beeman, Winchester, Geco, Gecado, Original and Peerless can all mean a Diana gun. Before RWS took over distribution of Diana in the 1980s, any of those names could be found on the various models.

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Evanix Renegade double-action rifle Part 5

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Today is the day many of you have been waiting for. Let me be the first to tell you – the news is very good! The Evanix Renegade rifle is a real shooter. However, it’s a repeater, as well as being capable of double-action fast firing, and there are some things you need to know.

I scoped the rifle with a Leapers 4-12×44 Mini-SWAT scope with sidewheel parallax adjustment and a 30mm scope tube. With that accomplished, I headed to the range, taking a hand pump to fill the gun.

Conditions
The range was relatively quiet, as the air clears ahead of Hurricane Ike. The winds were variable at 5-10 m.p.h. with no great gusts. The target was set out at 40 yards, because the Renegade is a long-range hunting rifle. It took 10 shots to get zeroed, with the first two at 10 feet and then a cylinder full at 20 yards. Once the target was moved to 40 yards, two more shots were required to get on target.

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BSF S20 Match – Part 1 Germany’s rifle-pistol

by B.B. Pelletier

When I was stationed in Germany from 1974 through 1977, I was primarily interested in clocks – both wall and tall case (grandfather/grandmother). My apartment was full of them! I had a favorite antique store in Fürth, a suberb of Nürnberg, where I bought most of them. One day, I spotted a strange air pistol in the store. It looked for all the world like someone had shortened a breakbarrel spring rifle and fashioned a wood pistol-grip stock for it. At the time, I was unaware that Erlangen, the city I was living in, was also the home of the Bayerische Sportwaffenfabrik (Bavarian Sporting Arms Manufacturer) or BSF. That pistol was a BSF S20.

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