Crosman 760 Pumpmaster Classic: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord

Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 760 Pumpmaster Classic
The new Crosman 760 Pumpmaster Classic.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Dot sight
  • The test
  • Sight in
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol pellets
  • No sight change
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • Gamo Match
  • H&N Finale Match Light pellets
  • Discussion
  • Summary

This will be our last look at the Crosman 760 Pumpmaster Classic. It has some surprising results, though not in a good way. But, like so many things, we sometimes learn by doing.

Dot sight

Way back in early February at the end of Part 4 I said I needed to return to this airgun and test it with a dot sight. I half-kidded about using Sig’s Romeo5 XDR that costs 9 times what the 760 costs. I would have done it for a laugh but it proved to be impossible. The Sig sight design is so focused on rifles with Picatinny rails and pistols that accept insert plates that it does not adapt to 11mm rails — even with the UTG 11mm to Weaver adaptor. So I had to find something else.

I wanted to use the UTG Micro Reflex sight, but it is dedicated to another test, so I defaulted to an old standby — a Tasco Pro Point red dot sight. It was already mounted in BKL medium one-inch rings, so it went right on.

Please bear in mind that the 760 is a smoothbore airgun. I am doing this test because it showed some promise in the Part 4 test.

The test

I shot from a rest at 10 meters. I shot 5-shot groups because the 760 is a multi-pump and each shot takes time to get ready, as well as time to load, since the dot sight is partly in the way of the breech.

Sight in

I started the sight-in at 12 feet and after three shots and adjustments I backed up to 10 meters. But even at 10 meters I could not get the shots to go to the bull I was aiming at. If I aimed at the center bull on the sheet of 5 bulls on a 10-meter target, the shots went to the bull below and to the right. So that is how I shot the test — going downrange and turning the target paper each time I changed pellets for a fresh bull.

760 sight in
This is the best I could get the dot sight adjusted on the 760.

RWS R10 Match Pistol pellets

First to be tested were the pellets that did the best in Part 4 — the RWS R10 Match Pistol pellets. These were the very best pellets in the 760 and were really the reason I did today’s test. I figured if it could put five shots in 0.458-inches at 10 meters with open sights, how much better could I do with a dot sight?

The answer is — no better. Only worse. With the dot sight the 760 put five R10 Match Pistol pellets in a group that measures 0.873-inches between centers. That’s almost twice the size of the group shot with open sights!

760 R10 target
With the Tasco Pro Point dot sight the smoothbore 760 put five RWS R10 Match Pistol pellets into 0.873-inches at 10 meters.

No sight change

After this first group I decided to leave the sight adjusted as it was. Since I had to turn the target paper for each pellet, the groups will seem to move around a bit, but that’s more from turning the target paper than from the shift of the pellets, though they will shift as well. At this point in the test I realized that I may have gone a step too far with the dot sight. The 760 does fine with the open sights it comes with.

Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets

Next to be tested was the Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellet. They did second-best in Part 4 with the open sights, so I hoped they would also do well here. Well, I may have goofed up and only fired 4 pellets this time. Looking at the target it sure looks that way. I didn’t realize it until I looked at the picture as I was writing this report. Those 4 or 5 pellets went into 1.161-inches at 10 meters — not too good!

760 Sig Alloy target
Four Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets went into 1.161-inches at 10 meters. I’m pretty sure there are only 4 pellets in this target.

Gamo Match

Since Pyramyd Air was kind enough to send me a tin of .177 caliber Gamo Match pellets, I tried them next. Five went into 0.781-inches, which is better than the first two pellets. 

760 Gamo Match target
Gamo Match pellets did better than the first two, but still nowhere near what the gun did with open sights. Five in 0.781-inches at 10 meters.

H&N Finale Match Light pellets

The last pellet I tested was the H&N Finale Match Light pellet that, despite the name, is the heaviest pellet of this test. I figured slowing things down might help. And it did! This time five pellets went into 0.672-inches at 10 meters. This is the smallest group of the test.

760 Finale Light target
Five H&N Finale Match Light pellets made this 0.672-inch group at 10 meters.

Discussion

The 760 did not become more accurate with the dot sight. We can blame the sight for not adjusting to the point of aim, but that doesn’t explain the group sizes that are larger (generally speaking) than those shot with open sights. I had the dot’s brightness turned down as low as I could see it , so it was just not a good day for me, I guess. 

I think that the 760 just wants to be what it is — an inexpensive, smoothbore multi-pump pneumatic that shoots both BBs and pellets. Mounting an expensive sight on it seems a waste of money and effort. Just shoot the thing the way it came from the factory. At least it doesn’t have fiberoptics!

Summary

This completes my report on the modern Crosman 760s Classic airgun. We may hear from other 760s in the future but they will be older guns that are no longer in production.

I have to recommend the current 760 to anyone who wants what this gun offers — reasonable power and accuracy at a very affordable price. I have told you how it works — the decision is yours.

47 thoughts on “Crosman 760 Pumpmaster Classic: Part 5

  1. B.B.,

    This gun definitely fills its own particular niche. Excellent as a knockabout beginner’s gun for short ranges and for people not very choosy regarding the ammunition for light hearted plinking.

    Siraniko


    • “Excellent as a knockabout beginner’s gun for short ranges”
      Siraniko,
      I think you captured the essence of it there; for $35, and no need for a scope (not with the decent short-range accuracy B.B. was able to display with open sights), I think this price-point airgun has a place. It has more power and accuracy than a Red Ryder (which PA lists for $50, by the way). A gun like this might satisfy a newbie for a while; then they might read this blog, and invest in other airguns. =>
      Take care & be careful at your job,
      dave



    • Yogi,

      They are what they are. Like an 880,…. nice, cheap little plinkers. The 880 is rifled though. I had an 880 that came scoped and after adjusting the objective lens,…it made a pretty accurate plinker. Good first guns for a kid and far better than a Red Ryder. Despite being cheap and plastic,… I think that they still hold up pretty well.

      Chris


  2. BB,

    Well,… you gave it a try. Going to be reviewing anything new in the near future?

    Chris

    FYI: Got the $1200 govt. check in the acct. this morning,… if anyone you know is waiting,… family, kids, grand kids, etc.. A few over at GTA have reported getting theirs in recent days too. The unemployment site in Ohio is continuing to have issues for anyone not already on it,…. despite adding 1000 people (they say) and 20x server capacity (they say). I have been ok, but it looks to have crashed again this am. Some people have been trying to sign up the 1st time for over a month now. Thankfully,… things are appearing better than what most states predicted with regards to COVID, but still not good. Be safe ya’ all.


    • Chris,

      I am Blessed that I can work from home, at least for now. Sales are starting to slow down and the big dogs are barking about possible furloughs. I do have to give them credit that they are trying to hang on to everybody, but sooner or later it is going to happen.

      Hang on folks, we are in for a rough ride.


      • RR,

        The Governor in Ohio (NY similar) are talking about masks and social distancing for the next year,.. or more (until a vaccine is made). Openings will be slow and careful. Pretty much like it is now. Look for very wide spread testing,…. when kits become available (required????).

        Good for you on still working. Oddly,… some on unemployment are better off (will be, with the +600/wk) and that is on top of what % they were getting/qualify for. Good for those that need it. Hopefully people will not be stupid with it. I was not making that take home when I was working and the company folded. To give some inside perspective on that,… I was making 18.60/hr (14 is avg. around here). I would have to get something making 20+ to even equal what I will be getting on unemployment. That is highly unlikely for me. Being near 60, average health… (as much as I hate to say it),…. I am going to ride this “train” awhile longer. I would be stupid $ wise not to and I hate being stupid $ wise. I have always worked and miss it.

        Yup,…. hang on.

        Chris


    • Chris

      Just received the $1200 and with a birthday coming I decided I had waited long enough. The Sig ASP20 in .177 is on the way. It is made here so I’m doing something to help USA workers. I’m good with the Swiss German connection too. It is for target shooting only at a maximum of 25 yards which explains going for .177 over .22.

      Have a good day all.

      Deck


  3. I have acquired some very nice plinkers in my time, both for pellets and bbs. I started my grandson off with a Daisy Buck because everything else was too big at the time. Now he shoots an HW30S.

    This thing is just too new for me. 😉


  4. Brent
    April 14, 2020 at 8:28 am
    BB
    From what you said at the end of the blog yesterday, I thought you were going to review a new airgun today. Is that still to come?
    Brent

    Reply
    B.B. Pelletier
    April 14, 2020 at 9:09 am
    Brent,
    Yes, and it is new, but no longer made.
    No more clues!
    B.B.

    What do you mean by “it is new, but no longer made”?



  5. BB,

    Any chance on getting the 30 minute edit feature back? It is back to 5 now. We had that issue before and “they” got it back to 30. It comes in real handy sometimes and I really appreciate the option.

    I can read something 5x before posting and then when I do post,…. and re-read again,… sure enough there will be some stupid little mistakes. Most often,…. something like a left out “it/at/the/if” etc..

    Being the iconic literary pro that you are,….. I am sure you can’t relate,……….. 😉

    Chris


  6. B.B.
    I too am almost 60, and my parents have discovered Zoom. Now a phone call is not enough.
    This is getting out of hand. I need more bandwidth, plus, they are getting right cranky at the Safeway check out.
    I will keep my head down. This is a good time to get some stuff done on the house, since I am lucky to have one.
    Or, fab up a red dot on my Gamo revolver….
    Hang in there folks!
    Rob



  7. B.B.,

    Pyramyd is currently sold out of the 760 Pumpmaster, with more on the way. Wonder if the shutdown produced a surge in sales from those wanting some affordable entertainment for themselves and their kids. It will certainly fill that bill. I have great memories of plinking with the old Powermaster 760 back in the late 60’s.

    Thanks,

    Walt


  8. Morning B.B. and all,
    The 760 is a nice little plinker and is so easy to use, but the accuracy of the smoothbore is only so good for target shooting. I get a fairly round pattern of strikes at the bull that doesn’t get much smaller than 1″ at ten yards in my basement range.
    Since the barrel is sized for BBs, the smaller diameter pellets might have a little yaw as they exit the muzzle. If you put the head of a pellet into the muzzle, it has wiggle room.
    What if we choked the muzzle a little, so the muzzle “sizes” the pellets just a bit, and squirts them out with no yaw angle? It would be a neat experiment, if it can be done without ruining the thing. Do you think the idea has merit? Of course we can’t expect too much from a smoothbore, but maybe a little better accuracy can be realized with a choked muzzle?




  9. B.B.,

    The Tasco Pro Point red dot has come in lots of versions over the years. Is the one you used a 5 MOA RED dot? That would mean the dot covers a bit of territory making precision aiming challenging. Also are you wearing eye glasses or other corrective lenses while shooting? If so your potential for Parallax goes up dramatically. You used a Millet Dot Sight, November 22, 2019 Blog:
    It hit the target backer board 4 inches below and two inches to the right of the aim point, which was the center of the bull. That may be coincidence or shows a pattern? I just can’t get my head around the loss of precision a change from Iron Sights to a Dot sight is giving you? I also obviously don’t have enough information to do a Tele-diagnostic. Any thoughts?

    shootski


    • shootski,

      I don’t know the size of the dot. I am wearing corrective lenses. You may be right, but I don’t know.

      Since I would not pout a dot on a 760 I guess I’m not too interested. I know I should be, but today has been busy and I’m concentrating on other things.

      B.B.



  10. Here’s a picture of my older 760 with peep sight. The sight is a Wiliams, but not the airgun model, one designed for powder burners. The front sight is a Crosman part that used to be offered. I don’t know if it’s available, but it is used on some of the custom shop guns.

    Works well for me. The sights cost more than the gun, if I remember right.


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