Umarex Fusion 2 CO2 rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Fusion 2
Umarex Fusion 2 CO2 repeater.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • A dime spacer
  • It worked!
  • Velocity
  • No feeding problems
  • Trigger pull
  • One final tip
  • Where we stand
  • Summary

Today we look at velocity of the Umarex Fusion 2 repeating air rifle again. After Part 2 I considered all the remarks carefully. I wanted to test the rifle’s accuracy but not before knowing how many shots I could count on.

A dime spacer

Reader EricfromSC said he used a dime as a spacer between the two CO2 cartridges and it worked. He also mentioned that he had the same magazine feeding issues I encountered and that by holding the rifle level when working the bolt they were resolved. When I test velocity I often cock the rifle with the muzzle up, so this time I was careful to hold it level.

I first dropped about 10 drops of automatic transmission stop leak into the CO2 tube before dropping the first CO2 cartridge in. Then I dropped in a Crosman CO2 cartridge. Since they were the only brand that actually worked in Part 2 I felt I needed to stay with them.

The I dropped in the first cartridge, followed by a dime. I wondered whether the dime would tilt sideways in the tube and mess things up, but it fit like it was made for it.

Fusion 2 dime
You are looking halfway down into the Fusion’s CO2 tube. The dime is resting on the wide end of the first CO2 cartridge. The fit is perfect.

For those in other countries who don’t have American dime coins, I used a new coin. The diameter is 17.91mm and the thickness is 1.35mm. The dime fits loosely enough that sticking won’t be a problem.

It worked!

I’m pleased to say the dime trick worked and both CO2 cartridges were pierced quite well. Look at the holes.

Fusion 2 cartridges
This time both CO2 cartridges were pierced well. The bottom one that had all the trouble before is on the left.

Velocity

I decided to only shoot the JSB Exact RS pellet, as it has no feeding issues last time. The first 9 shots gave an average 640 f.p.s. The low was 634 and the high was 652, so a spread of 18 f.p.s.

The second 9 shots averaged 642 f.p.s. The low was 633 and the high was 651, so  another spread of 18 f.p.s.

The third 9 shots averaged 623 f.p.s. The low was 605 and the high was 641 f.p.s. So the spread this time was 36 f.p.s.

The fourth 9 shots averaged 553 f.p.s. The low was 506 and the high was 590 f.p.s.

I will show you the fifth string.

Shot……..vel.
37……….439
38……….404
39……….366
40……….316
41……….255

I ended the test at this point to keep from sticking a pellet in the barrel. Without a doubt the Fusion 2 uses a LOT of CO2!

No feeding problems

Once I held the rifle level as EricfromSC suggested the feeding was perfect. But I will say that every time the bolt passes through the magazine you can see the mag move a little. So watch this!

Trigger pull

I didn’t give you the trigger pull in Part 2. The trigger is single-stage with a long smooth pull that maxed at between 3 lbs. 3 oz. and 3 lbs. 8 oz. The average was 3 lbs. 6 oz.

One final tip

It occurred to me that since I had removed the CO2 adaptor tube to try the 88-gram cartridge, it was now coming out of the rifle every time I installed new cartridges. Looking at the manual I see that it’s not supposed to do that. So here is my tip. First, screw the adaptor into the rifle as far as you can, then load the two cartridges with the dime between. When you screw the knurled end cap down, leave the relief valve open so you can hear when the lower cartridge is pierced. The knurled end cap will allow you to screw the adaptor down as far into the rifle as it will go. When the hissing starts, screw the relief valve down as far as it will go. The hissing stops right away but keep turning the valve until it stops to pierce the top cartridge fully. I conducted several experiments to determine this was the most reliable way to pierce both cartridges! I do not care for this design! 

Where we stand

Now that the rifle is working and I know its quirks I’m ready to move on to accuracy testing. I hasve read so many good things about the accuracy that I’m looking forward to it.

I would like to thank EricfromSC for his comments to Part 2. Without them I don’t think I could do an accuracy test on this rifle.

Summary

I have this to say about the Fusion 2. It has some shortcomings that I was able to overcome with help. I wish the magazine was more positive and why can’t I still get the 88-gram CO2 cartridge to pierce. Those things need to be addressed. But if you own one, I hope today’s report helps you.

57 thoughts on “Umarex Fusion 2 CO2 rifle: Part 3





  1. Shootski,

    Fine Toledo steel.

    And you did not forget the wooden pikes. I often joked with my wife that should she run me off she would be very lonely as any suitor’s head would end up on a wooden pike at the end of the driveway to let others know to stay away.

    I do not understand, but I look forward to the fruition of His plans.


    • RidgeRunner,

      Yea! Toledo Steel…I needed a sword for work so i went for the best while i was stationed in Spain. I had bought my ceremonial sword in the USA that looked like it would fall apart after the first thrust. I wanted one that was great looking, to Uniform Regs specification, but that actually would fight. I had my Drill Manual down but wanted to be able to fight a long blade so i took lessons from a Sword Master…i wouldn’t say i’m great but at least look better than most film swordsmanship examples. It was really hard work!
      Pikes are psychologically effective as are Roman Crosses! Not to speak of Pungi stick traps! All will make miscreants think twice!
      But back to airguns: i don’t like the looks of the silencer! How can you call it a CAN? LOL!

      shootski


      • Shootski,

        Took lessons from a Sword Master – Always wanted to do that! May not be “regulation” but I always favored a Katana.

        Had a bit of instruction with a bokken, enough to be dangerous (to myself) and enough to know that the bokken, in spite of being for “practice”, is a pretty formidable weapon in its own right.

        Have a pair of bokken and a few jo-staffs I made from ironwood and a couple of Irish Walking Sticks (shillelaghs) from buckthorn (a hard wood similar to Osage) hanging on the wall for “decoration” (and home defense). Fun stuff.

        Hank


        • “…the bokken, in spite of being for ‘practice’, is a pretty formidable weapon in its own right.”
          Hank,
          That is quite true. I, too, studied Kenjutsu for a bit, and I still have my oak bokken; and as we know from the life of the great sword master, Miyamoto Musashi, the bokken can be a very serious weapon:
          https://www.warhistoryonline.com/ancient-history/turning-point-samuraimusashi.html
          Thank you for reminding me that it’s time to dust off the old bokken and hang it up in the gun room. =>
          Cheers,
          dave


        • Hank,

          My training was almost all on how to fight at long range; to include Over The Horizon. That and learning to fight with sticks and smooth pebbles in my youth taught me that close quarters when you get to feel the impact you deliver and suffer the impacts when you make a mistake are actually similar. The body you are attacking is just on a different scale. The one punch one thrust takedown of similarly prepared combatants is another Hollywood fiction most of the time. I enjoy the contact when fightingvwith training tools it is instantly instructive.

          Just as with airsoft airguns you don’t go against a sniper with a good rifle with an airsoft pistol. Unless you have a plan and you suffer losses to execute if the diversion doesn’t work! One more: you hunt HOGS with Big Bore not gamo .177!

          shootski



            • Arcadian,

              I have seen some of his posts and know the area he hunts on the North Shore of Oahu pretty good. The US Navy had/has a facility up in the mountains above the Nort Shore that i worked at occasionally over the years. In the posts I saw he was hunting with a .452 DAQ Pistol with the fancy Crosman Stock. Did you see him post about hunting Hogs with a .177 airgun?

              shootski


              • If I remember correctly he has used a Disco 4.5 and a Benjamin .22 gas piston. You may try to search in GTA where his section is under the name Manny’s corner. He has used mainly Evanix airguns, many of them in .22 and .25 caliber.
                Bill





        • RidgeRunner,

          “That was one of the most realistic war movies I ever saw.”

          Is that really saying a lot? It was all fake blood and guts. Probably dirt makeup too!

          shootski


          • Shootski,

            They actually filmed that in the jungles, I cannot remember where. It took them months.

            What it showed was the insanity of it. Who was the real enemy? Why?

            Now as for the most realistic scene, the Normandy landing at the beginning of Saving Private Ryan. After that it was mostly a Tom Hanks movie. There were a few real scenes during it, but when good ol’ Tom opened his mouth…


          • Shootski,

            I suppose that I would be amiss for nominating the Rambo series and the Expendable’s series???? Come on,…. you gotta’ have some love for the latter,………. I mean,…. it has like ALL the tuff guys in it! 😉

            Chris


            • ChrisUSA,

              So the Rambo series and not the Expendables! RAMBO! Only because Silvester was in my HS Homeroom for a few months after he got dismissed from Father Judge CHS!
              The Jesuit Bothers at Father Judge just couldn’t tame him! And Public School just moved him along and gone without fixing/helping him.

              My Take: Movies are to be entertaining, a diversion, and maybe slightly informative. Not try to be REALISTIC when that is next to impossible in my opinion.
              Rambo series also had Richard Crenna which leads me to my all time favorite war movie, The Sand Pebbles, and Movie Star. None other than Steve McQueen…the master of Cool! I wore Lee 101z and Chukka Boots (Desert Boots) in my teens and twenties. I still favor black or white Submariner Roll Neck sweaters; but with a well worn, issue, G1 goatskin jacket. None of that shaken or stirred stuff; Woodford Reserve Bourbon Whiskey neat by the hearth, cool water on the side or some Pilsner Urquell by the pony keg when it is hot outside.

              The real deal or nothing! Lol!

              shootski


  2. BB,
    I saw Rick Eustler’s Review of the Fusion on his channel and he didn’t seem to have any problems with it. Maybe you just got a bad gun. Maybe contacting him to see his experience with the gun wouldn’t be a bad idea either.

    Brent


  3. Hi , guys! I just finished testing a just-now rebuilt Buck 105b (back from the dead, from MANY sources) and reviewed the PyrAir Aug 2019 articles on it BEFORE MY tests. ANDdddd, I added TwoTalon’s idea from back then: for two different Daisy Bucks I tested for max accuracy (Daisy PGS BBs) at my standard 50 ft range, THEN I filled up their magazines to ~100%, then re-tested accuracy again. (( Sorry, BB: All tests were two sets of 5 shots each…)) Results:
    A: With a PACKED tubular magazine, the rebuilt-from-old-parts (bbl HAD to have shot over 10,000 x) Buck showed groups ~0.55” SMALLER, same PoI angular offset, and ~0.75” MORE off-set from PoA. Not much change really, given the 3-4” group sizes for this beastie..
    B: Again with a PACKED tubular magazine, my new, 2 yr old Buck (now just 600 shots through it) showed groups ~0.45” LARGER, angular offset ~50 degrees off, and ~same inches offset from PoA.
    In hindsight now, looking over the data, I think I’ll repeat the test using twin 10-grp tests for comparisons, esp since the groups sizes are so huge. Besides, think of all the small-talk this will generate while waiting for the extra tests! RIGHT, 2-Tal. GF, BB, Shootski? 🙂 


    • Barrika,

      50 feet is a long ways off for a bb gun/rifle. What is it that you are trying to accomplish/prove? Glad you got the one rebuilt. I did some mod. work on a 499. Fun to work on.

      Chris


    • Barrika,

      50′ is a long way…but i can see why.

      Just don’t loose sight of FUN. If that gives you pleasure then do it till Lights Out.
      I know I would!

      shootski


  4. Good deal BB,

    Very glad to see your are moving forward with the review. I like the looks of the silencer too. Just wished it silenced a little bit more.

    Eric


  5. I know that 50′ is a stretch, but I feel that gives a better view of impacts: they space out a bit more, obviously. The minute of angle is what I look for. And NO, I do NOT hunt with these: just kill papers & cans! 🙂

    BTW: these Daisy PGS BBs are the best for both these Bucks: CuHds, Blk Widos, Dust Devils, Dsy-Zns, etc: not quite as good, and the PGS DO fit through these barrels, even though they are sl larger than most! SOME Daisy Buck bbls had, in the past, refused to pass-through some Daisy ammo: bad batch(es) from China I guess…


    • I also failed to mention that I drill out the plunger tube in my Bucks, to 0.108″ ID: gives them about 40% more velocity, since it transfer the air flow much faster… Thus a little more reach and flatter. c/o Cobalt327


  6. At the end you point out that the tips you include in the blog today are aimed at those who own a Fusion 2, that’s good, because with all the great inexpensive airguns out there now one would have to be crazy to buy one with so many quirks.

    If you like the way that dime fits, try a penny. They are just about the exact same diameter as a CO2 cartridge. I use them to shim the hammer spring of my QB based guns. I even sanded the markings off both sides of one penny so there is no variation in thickness. Of course, any 3/4” washer will do just as well if you don’t want to sink any actual money into fixing a Fusion 2.



      • Washers and pennies… ah the irony. I had just given the old “Use the right tool for the job” speech to some young carpenters in the shop the other day who were banging on something with a crescent wrench. I was working on mounting a table saw to a stand and lo and behold I can’t find a single washer in the shop to fit the bolts I’m using. 7 pennies and a nickel from the ashtray in my truck with 1/4″ holes did the trick just fine but the hypocrisy and humor of it was not lost on those young guys.




      • GF1,

        Don’t be scared, man. It has more of a futuristic look than most. The Crosman SBD silencers are pretty cool looking also, as are the new RAW silencers.

        That triangular silencer on a shorty .177 plinker would look cool.

        I do state elsewhere that I do not like the rest of the air rifle.


        • RR
          I don’t know. I still like the (normal) round silencers.

          Well really I don’t even like them. I like the looks of a shrouded barrel. It kind of gives the gun a bull barrel look.




    • RidgeRunner,

      If i balance a coin on top of the cartridge cut the 88 and coin in half with a machete and the butt half launches a ways…that’s WORK right?
      Call me a Traditionalist but still prefer a CAN on the end of the barrel!

      shootski





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