Dragonfly linkage
Dragonfly Mark 2.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Background
  • Discussion
  • What is learned?
  • Summary

Today we do one small test that will teach us a lot about the Seneca Dragonfly Mark 2 multi-pump rifle.

Background

I mentioned in Part 2 that I wanted to do this test, but not before the rifle had been pumped and fired many more times. Well, the accuracy tests in Parts 3 and 4 did just that, so the rifle is ready to be tested for velocity again.

You may recall that when I first tested the rifle with JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy pellets on 3 to 15 pumps (the manual allows up to 15 pumps per shot) that, starting with shot number 10, the velocity didn’t rise as I expected with each pump stroke. In fact it looked like this.

Pumps…….Velocity
3……………..428
4……………..476
5……………..518
6……………..553
7……………..564
8……………..583
9……………..589
10……………602
11……………601
12……………617
13……………605
14……………617
15……………618

Then I returned to the same pellet at the end of the report and tested it again with 3 strokes, 8 strokes and 15 strokes, where I got the following velocities.

Pumps……..Velocity
3..……………475 (428 before)
8..……………611 (583 before)
15..…………..653 (618 before)

After seeing those numbers I said the following, “I am guessing that the next time we look at velocity with this rifle there will be more separation on shots 11 through 15.”

Today I do that test and we shall see. I will show the first velocity, followed by today’s velocity for each pump stroke, and of course I am using the same JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy pellets.

        Velocity    Velocity   

Pumps……..Then…………..Today
3……………..428…………….488
4……………..476…………….526
5……………..518…………….568
6……………..553…………….589
7……………..564…………….604
8……………..583…………….620
9……………..589…………….629 no air remaining
10……………602…………….638 no air remaining
11……………601…………….642 no air remaining
12……………617…………….649 no air remaining
13……………605…………….649 no air remaining
14……………617…………….657 no air remaining
15……………618…………….674 no air remaining

Discussion

Some of the things I thought would happen did, but some didn’t turn out as I expected, and that makes for a good test result. First — what did I expect?

I suspected the rifle needed a break-in period because of the result I got at the end of the Part 2 report, where it went from 618 to 653 f.p.s. on 15 pumps. We certainly got that. The 18.13-grain JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy pellet is now up to 674 f.p.s. Will it continue to increase? I would guess that it will. But the amount of the future increase will be smaller than what we have seen thus far. This pellet might increase to 685 f.p.s., or so, on 15 pumps after another couple hundred shots.

And by the way, that pellet traveling 674 f.p.s. generates 18.29 foot-pounds of energy. Remember, 671 f.p.s. is the “magic number” at which the weight of the pellet in grains equals the energy in foot pounds. I gotta tell you, guys, 18 foot-pounds is a lot of energy for a multi-pump pneumatic! Especially one at this price.

I did not expect the velocity to remain the same at 10 and 11 pump strokes on today’s test. I thought there would always be some separation, however small. But, unlike the very first test, the velocity never diminished. And it only remained the same for those two pump strokes — 10 and 11.

And I did test the rifle for air remaining after the shot. From shots 9 through 15 I cocked the rifle after the shot and pulled the trigger again — no air remaining.

What is learned?

This is the fifth report on the Seneca Dragonfly Mark 2 multi-pump rifle. I consider this rifle an advance in multi-pump technology. It’s not perfect though. I can list several things I wish would change:

1. Change the front sight for a square-topped post.
2. Get rid of the rotary magazine and the single shot tray and just let this be a single shot rifle.
3. Make the rifle in .25 caliber.

Number two on my wish list will never happen, because people who haven’t used a multi-pump will see the rotary magazine as an advantage. And for some it really is. My brother-in-law, Bob, tells me he finds loading pellets singly hard to do, and I know there are people with neuropathy in their hands who feel the same, as well as people with large sausage fingers.

Number one should happen but probably won’t because many people enjoy shooting tin cans and other stuff for which a large dot sight works well.

I think we can look forward to number three. The developers aren’t dumb. They know the market and right now .25 caliber is a desirable thing. Of course when that happens people will start talking about .30 caliber and the beat will go on and on. And that is business at its best.

Finally, this rifle does need to be broken-in. Expect that.

Summary

Small test; big results. I see this report as a capper for those planning to buy a Dragonfly Mark 2. Will I test it further? You betcha! Certainly with a dot sight and perhaps with a scope if I can find one that will work. I have some ideas.