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BB’s Goldie: Part Four

BBs Goldie
BB’s Goldie is a golden Cerakoted Avenger. The reservoir, receiver, muzzle cap, forward Picatinney rail and cocking handle were colored differently to set off the gold.

Part 1
Labradar chronograph
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Lower the reg pressure
  • Hammer spring adjustment
  • The test
  • Air Arms 16-grain domes
  • H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme
  • Discharge
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Monster Redesigned
  • Trigger
  • Summary

Today we start testing the 25-yard accuracy of BB’s Goldie, which is a .22-caliber Air Venturi Avenger that has been custom Cerakoted to BB’s tastes. But before we do that there are some things that must be done first. I said at the end of Part 3 that I wanted to detune my rifle that was set up a bit too hot for my liking. To do that involves lowering the regulator pressure and backing off on the hammer spring.

Lower the reg pressure

By lowering the regulator pressure I lower the amount of pressurized air that will be available to get behind the pellet when the trigger is pulled. Yes, the air volume that’s available to push the pellet remains the same, but by lowering the air pressure in that chamber I lower the amount of push the air will be able to give. And that, my friends, is an amount of air.

To lower the regulator pressure I went to Part 3 of the Avenger report that was written on June 18 of 2020. I followed the detailed directions given there but because we need to discuss this step I will talk about it now. The first step is to exhaust all the air in the reservoir and then turn the reg adjustment screw in all the way. Then you are supposed to turn the adjustment screw back out a quarter turn. I did that but when I pressurized the reservoir again the reg gauge went up to over 2,000 psi. 

Goldie reg pressure
After turning the reg pressure adjustment screw out just a quarter turn, the reg registered 2,200 psi when the rifle was filled.

Each rifle will be different, And apparently my Goldie is a hot rifle! Too bad that’s not what I want. Once again I released all the air in the reservoir and this time I only backed the adjustment screw out an eighth of a turn.  When I filled the reservoir this time the reg. needle went up to the bottom of the green. Perfect!

Goldie reg pressure
After the second reg adjustment the needle went up to the bottom of the green. Well, maybe it’s a bit higher than that, but I’m not adjusting the reg again.

Hammer spring adjustment

The reg is now set to 1,800 psi at this time. Next I backed off on the hammer spring adjustment screw about one and one-half turns. That should be fine, but until I chronograph the shots I won’t know. I’m doing too much today to also chronograph, so I’ll save that for next time. And when I do we’ll already know what sort of accuracy these settings give us.

The test

Today I’m shooting 10-shot groups off a sandbag at 25 yards. I am using the 10-shot magazine since I thought I remembered that it doesn’t affect the accuracy. Upon more research I wasn’t able to find that stated in any past tests of the .22-caliber Avenger, so next time I’ll shoot it for accuracy with the single shot tray. That being said, today’s best group of the first pellet was nearly as small as the best Avenger group ever shot from a single-shot tray.

Air Arms 16-grain domes

First to be tested were Air Arms 16-grain domes that have proven to be the best pellets in an Avenger. The rifle was sighted for 10 meters in Part 3 so I just shot the first group with that scope setting. The pellets landed about two inches above my aim point. Except for the first pellet that hit lower, nine shots went into a quarter inch. All ten shots are in 0.606-inches.

Goldie AA 16 1
The first group of 10 Air Arms 16-grain domes measures 0.606-inches between centers with the last 9 in 0.25-inches at 25 yards.

I adjusted the scope and shot a second group. I took out the 10-dot with the first shot of the next group. Of course I did! So for the rest of the group I had to guesstimate where the center of the target was. And yet I still managed to put 10 pellets into a group that measured 0.248-inches between centers. That’s pretty darn good!

Goldie AA 16 2
Even with the center of the bull blown away I managed to put 10 Air Arms 16-grain into a 0.248-inch group at 25 yards. I might do better if I could see the aim point, but it wouldn’t be that much better!

The Air Arms 16-grain dome is still the best pellet for a .22-caliber Avenger. Now let’s see about some others.

Shop Benjamin Rifles

H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme

Next up was the Baracuda Hunter Extreme pellet. I remember recently where this pellet surprised me by being the most accurate of all in a certain airgun. In BB’s Goldie ten of them went into a group that measures 0.50-inches between centers. It’s the largest group of today’s test and, in light of all the other accurate pellets there are, this one isn’t for my Goldie.

Goldie Hunter Extreme
BB’s Goldie put 10 H&N Baracuda Hunter Extremes into a 0.50-inch group at 25 yards.

Discharge

I said I would measure the discharge sound in this report. It registered 90.8 decibels, which is pretty quiet for a PCP that’s putting pellet out in the 30 foot-pound range.

Goldie discharge


JSB Exact Jumbo Monster Redesigned

The last pellet I tested today was the JSB Exact Jumbo Monster Redesigned. Ten of them went into a group that measures 0.231-inches between centers at 25 yards. This time I barely preserved the aim point and, thanks to the clarity of the Meopta scope, I was able to see and use it for all 10 shots. This was today’s most accurate group, though in the past Air Arms 16-grain pellets have done better in a different Avenger. But this pellet will be one to retest.

Goldie Monster Redesigned
BB’s Goldie put 10 JSB Exact Jumbo Monster Redesigned pellets into a 0.231-inch group at 25 yards.

Trigger

I did adjust the Goldie trigger a little lighter this time. The pull is a definite two stage with some movement but no creep in stage two. Stage one stops at 11 ounces. Stage two breaks at 2 pounds 6 ounces.

Summary

BB’s Goldie is holding up quite well in testing. As this is the third Avenger I have tested and they have all been accurate I have to say that this model is a winner. In 2020 I said the Avenger is the best airgun I have tested this century! Nothing has changed since then.

29 thoughts on “BB’s Goldie: Part Four”

  1. Tom,

    I sense that you are adapting well to the user of the Labradar. How significant has the time been saved for you?

    Siraniko

    PS Section H&N Baracuda Hunter Extreme 1st paragraph 2nd sentence: “I remember recently where this pellet surprised me byu (by) being the most accurate of all in a certain airgun.”

    • Yogi,

      To each his own I guess. The truth is I preferred the stock black. I played with that customizer a bit, but just could not find anything but black for that stock. They do have a wood stock version and a nicely grained walnut might help some, but there is not much you can do with the shape. In the fore stock there is a short additional air reservoir. There is not much you can do with it I am afraid.

    • Yogi,

      To each his own I guess. The truth is I preferred the stock black. I played with that customizer a bit, but just could not find anything but black for that stock. They do have a wood stock version and a nicely grained walnut might help some, but there is not much you can do with the shape.

      https://www.pyramydair.com/product/air-venturi-avenger-regulated-pcp-air-rifle-wood-stock?m=5307

      In the fore stock there is a short additional air reservoir. There is not much you can do with it I am afraid.

      If the truth be told, that wood stock version looks pretty nice.

  2. “In 2020 I said the Avenger is the best airgun I have tested this century! Nothing has changed since then.” Well, since you have a custom one, you will not want that S510 anymore. If she is ready to move out of TGABBE, I think I can make room for that gal here at RRHFWA. 😉

    The truth is these air rifles have had my attention for years. I was seriously looking at them when they were known as the Nova Vista Liberty. Since then, they have actually been improved upon. This is one of the very few airgun manufacturers who have learned what it takes to make it in the USA market.

    Some of the others need to figure out that you do not need to have a new model every year. What you need is to make a good quality model at a decent price and maintain that quality throughout the years. Air Arms has learned that. Weihrauch has learned that. Apparently, even Nova Vista has figured this out. Many of the others need to figure this out, and not just in the airgun world.

    • >>> Some of the others need to figure out that you do not need to have a new model every year. <<<

      RR,

      Think that is a hard call for the manufacturers. Do you try to sell a modified model as something new (maybe to divorce yourself from a product that has a bad reputation) or do you want to take advantage of a product name by sticking with the original name?

      Guess that depends on whether "new and improved" means cutting manufacturing corners to increase profits or that there are technological improvements incorporated in the new model.

      Seems to be a damned if you do, damned if you don't sort of thing. People complain that FX is constantly improving their products but the market is demanding that they do so. Like the Impact development history… MK1 was a 33 fpe (in .22) pellet gun that became a pellet/slug 60 fpe MK2 that is now a 90 fpe slug/pellet MK3. FX could have continued making the MK1 (demand exceeded availability) but the followed their customer's needs/wants for a pellet gun that could shoot slugs.

      So do you make a good product, maximize the product life/minimize the investment for the best profits? Or do you adopt a continuous improvement model and hope to cover development/tooling costs by selling new models to people who always want the latest and greatest?

      Interesting thing to ponder.

      Hank

      • Hank,

        First thing you do is quit wasting money on marketing and fire the entire lot. When you do have something that is truly and improvement over your present products, you hire an outside marketing bunch to let the public know that such exists. Or you attend various product shows where the distributors see your product and you allow them to market for you.

        Weihrauch does not introduce a new product every year. When they have something new, all they have to do is show it to several of the distributors and off it goes. They do not waste much money on advertising.

    • RR
      Avenger “the best gun tested this century”. Dragonfly likewise. It seems like BB develops an “oriental” taste…
      I think I will stay with his enabling about the LGV, ” the break barrel equivalent to the TX 200″. Old world (Europe) taste.
      Now if I could only find the folding stock, sidelever Bam, then I can try some oriental myself.

  3. My bad. I think that Air Arms is starting to get caught up in that “new model every year” race.

    I think they all feel they need to “go with the flow”. They will more likely “get lost in the fog”.

    • >>> I think they all feel they need to “go with the flow”. They will more likely “get lost in the fog”. <<<

      RR,

      You know I prefer traditional airguns; for my first PCP I wanted an Air Arms – badly! During my research I discovered the Weihrauch HW100 and ended up going with one because it has several better (IMHO) features.

      The S510 is an incredible airgun, incredible enough that I recently bought one as my last purchase for VARACC (no more vacancies).

      Air Arms addressed the lack of a regulator (which was the deal-breaker that led to the HW100) but if you look at the S510 closely you can see it evolved from a single shot, bolt action origin where as the HW100 was designed (from the beginning) as a regulated, lever action repeater.

      With the advancements in airguns these days, I think that "going with the flow" is pretty much mandatory.

      Hank

        • Just speaking generally about the improvements in effective range and capability of airguns these days.

          New developments and features are trickling down from the high end airguns and being made available in more entry level products. Would say that the Avenger is a prime example.

          • Hank,

            All that is happening there is that the very features of the top end airguns are being shown to be really inexpensive and are overpriced in such things as the FX line. I do understand that because of the outrageous taxes in Sweden to support their welfare state is reflected in the price of the Impact, etc., but I do not see any purpose in supporting their folly. Hence, I do not own an FX airgun.

            Most;of the European airguns are outrageously priced. Why? Because some have found out that some people with more money than sense will pay the price. OK fine. I look at what they are offering and I go “What?! Nah.” I am going to wait a bit and pick it up used for nothing. I have to admit that when push comes to shove, I have a considerable bit invested in my Texan LSS, however I have almost nothing invested in my Talon SS with geegobs of aftermarket parts and accessories, including a Hawke scope.

            By the way, since you seem to be so convinced that there have been huge advances in airgunnery and you have one of the latest and greatest of the FX Impacts, perhaps you would be willing to part with one of your HW100’s for a very reasonable price. 😉

  4. If every consumer in every field of consumption practiced Tomek’s Denial To The Trash philosophy, you would see a lot of bad/useless products disappear, which would be a good thing. If you want better products you will need to have better, more discerning consumers first, though. Meantime, at least in airgun world, Tom’s reviews help us separate the wheat from the chaff

    May Christmas bring you all blessings and much health so you can continue to enjoy and engage with life.

  5. BB-

    Congrats on the good shooting. Don’t know that a .25” difference in group size/pellet dispersion at 25 yards is enough to kick out a usable pellet. That is only about one pellet diameter increase. I think I would rejoice in having a gun that shoots everything so precisely regardless what you feed it.

    On a totally unrelated subject, I bought a few Crosman Spinning Targets, Model CSLT. On the back of the package there is advertising for additional accessories, one of which is the Collapsible Pellet Trap Indoor/Outdoor, Model 0853. It has the following recommendation- ‘It is not recommended for use with airguns that exceed 800 fps in.177 caliber, 650 fps in.20 caliber, 750 fps in .22 caliber, .25 caliber airguns or metal-tipped pellets.’ First off, isn’t any lead or zinc pellet, metal-tipped? But the big news (not) is the fact that the .20 caliber is more efficient in the ability to defeat the metal deflector sheet included in the above target. Crosman, the company that has turned the Sheridan name into a mockery of what once was and no longer supports any .20 caliber ammo, now admits the truth? How funny is that?

  6. B.B.,

    Wrote: “Then you are supposed to turn the adjustment screw back out a quarter turn. I did that but when I pressurized the reservoir again the reg gauge went up to over 2,000 psi.”
    Save yourself a little air and more importantly a little time. From experience shoot a few pellets/blanks and see if the regulator and/or gauge stays the same before you take the time to vent the reservoir and reset. I would also have the LabRadar up and running for this kind of change to corroborate the gauge/regulator changes.
    Just a suggestion since this is your testing to do as you see fit.
    This airgun is possibly Interesting.
    Hope you get it to shoot to your liking.

    shootski

  7. BB,

    Your new TX200 MkIII with its very recent tune up configuration is better than any Diana 27, including for the reasons that you love the 27. I think the queen is dead, and there is a new king. I’ve just re-read your latest series on TX200. What a springer…

    What are the other ‘coil’ springers that you know of which won’t require mainspring compressor during disassembly?

  8. BSA Meteor Super is, now, sold in the US and advertised as gas piston springer. I am a little confused. Wasn’t it a coil springer? If it really comes with a gas piston, with its ‘up to’ 900 fps velocity at .177 cal and 12 ft-lbs of energy, it should be well balanced.

    The .177 cal Proxima had a reasonable velocity rating of 820 fps (conservatively). Well balanced as well, I think, but the market didn’t understand its lower power value and put it down for being weak in some customer reviews – very unfair. I always say that Hatsan should use the Proxima powerplant in its .177 cal 95 design and make a precision model out of it.

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