Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle
Ruger 10/22.

This report covers:

  • Mounting the dot sight
  • The R47 sight
  • Can you see the front sight through the dot sight?
  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • First group
  • RWS Superdome
  • Crosman Premier Light
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Ten-shot group
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today I will test the Ruger 10/22 at 25 yards. I’m doing this so the rifle can go back to Umarex, because they are apparently waiting for it. Other writers, I suppose.

Mounting the dot sight

As I mentioned in Part 2, Umarex sent an Axeon R47 dot sight to test on the Ruger, and today I will mount it and sight it in, then test the rifle at 25 yards. To mount any aftermarket sight to a 10/22 you have to first install Weaver bases. I showed you the factory-drilled holes for those bases in Part 2. I took a new package of two-piece Weaver bases and screwed them to the top of the receiver. That took 5 minutes. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle
Ruger 10/22.

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • H&N Baracuda Green
  • Sights are challenging
  • Crosman Premier Lights
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • JSB Exact RS
  • RWS SuperMag
  • RWS R10 Match Pistol
  • Qiang Yuan Training
  • H&N Match Green
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today we start our look at the accuracy of the new Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle from Umarex. This was an interesting test, to say the least!

The test

I’m only concerned with one thing today — the potential accuracy of as many pellets as possible. So, I shot 5-shot groups from 10 meters using the open sights on the rifle. I shot with the rifle rested directly on the sandbag and I cocked the bolt for every shot to make the trigger as light as possible. Let’s get started.

Sight-in

The rifle was shooting high and left when I started sighting in. I could lower the rear sight okay but there is no easy way to adjust it right and left. So all my groups are to the left of the bull today. After sight-in the sights were never touched again. read more


Springfield Armory M1 Carbine BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

M1 Carbine
Springfield Armory M1 Carbine BB gun.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Maxed out
  • The test
  • Charging
  • OOPs!
  • Problem number 2
  • How to get the empty cartridge out
  • Cartridge out
  • Will the second cartridge seal?
  • Oh, boy!
  • Daisy BBs
  • Air Venturi Dust Devils
  • Hornady Black Diamond
  • Smart Shot
  • Shot count
  • Feed
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

There is lots of interest in this BB gun lookalike! Several of you have owned Carbines in the past, or own them now, and reader Bob M is following this report and also reporting on his conversion of an airsoft Carbine from semiauto to full auto. While full auto is interesting to many, I don’t think the Carbine is the right gun for it. The firearm had a not-so-bright history with Rock-N-Roll.The M2 Carbine that is select-fire is known to wear out more rapidly in the full auto mode. More rapidly than what, you ask? Than the standard semiautomatic Carbine. read more


Springfield Armory M1 Carbine BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

M1 Carbine
Springfield Armory M1 Carbine BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Me and the M1 Carbine
  • Crosman M1 Carbine
  • The real deal
  • NOT invented by “Carbine” Williams
  • The Carbine program
  • Firepower
  • Hundreds of manufacturers
  • Three principal variations
  • Springfield Armory M1 Carbine
  • Description
  • Small details
  • No disassembly
  • Overall evaluation

Today I start the report on the M1 Carbine from Springfield Armory. I normally don’t like making comparisons, but in the case of lookalike airguns I have to. So today I will tell you what I really think about how closely this BB gun resembles the firearm it copies.

Me and the M1 Carbine

When I was a kid, I saw my first M1 Carbine at a friend’s house. Until that moment I didn’t know this firearm existed. My friend’s father had purchased his Carbine from the NRA for the magnificent sum of $20. Of course in those days that was a lot more money than it is today. It was more like $100-$150. read more


Pause to reflect

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Blue Book coming
  • Overwhelmed
  • Price-point PCP
  • Compressors
  • The value compressor
  • Set-and-forget
  • Gun compressors
  • Repeating spring guns
  • Lookalikes
  • Big Bores
  • Special things
  • Over to you

Blue Book coming

I have been writing my next Blue Book of Airguns report. My section is called Gaylord Reports, and I try to summarize all that has happened since the last Blue Book was published. The new book should be released in May or early June.

The last Blue Book was published in 2016. While that sounds like just three years ago, since the book was actually written the year before, it’s a full 3-plus years and going on four. More has happened in this time than at anytime in the history of airguns!

Overwhelmed

There is so much information that I cannot get it into one report. I’m having to consolidate all of the exciting things into categories. And doing that has caused me to pause for reflection. There is more going on with airguns today than I have ever seen. I would like to share my view with you right now, and then give you the opportunity to comment. read more


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle.

This report covers:

  • The obvious
  • Description
  • Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle magazine
  • Side-by-side
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • CO2
  • Velocity
  • Bolt release
  • A lot more!

A couple readers guessed that yesterday’s report was the start of the Ruger 10/22 Air Rifle. That’s point number one. This is a real Ruger Air Rifle. It’s branded that way, which means that no Ruger collection is complete without one. I have seen Ruger collectors pay thousands of dollars for rare examples of Ruger guns, including an unfired .256 Winchester Magnum Ruger Hawkeye that went for more than $3,000. Quite a lot for a single-shot pistol, wouldn’t you say?

The obvious

Let’s address the elephant in the room. This isn’t the first 10/22 air rifle lookalike we’ve seen. Crosman’s 1077 is meant to copy the 10/22, and of course their Benjamin Wildfire is the same gun using high pressure air. Both rifles resemble the 10/22 but also have differences — particularly in the magazine area. Having said that, I don’t want to continue to make comparisons — it isn’t my style. read more


Diana Chaser air pistol: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Diana Chaser air pistol
The Diana Chaser is a new CO2 pistol.

This report covers:

  • Mount the sight
  • Front sight?
  • Cut to the chase
  • The test
  • The trigger
  • Dialed the dot way down
  • First target
  • Second target
  • Summary

Today I test the Diana Chaser air pistol with the UTG RDM20 Reflex Micro Dot sight we have been reviewing. The last test was done with the sight mounted on a Beeman P1 back in January, and it did quite well. I told you I wasn’t going to run a special report on the sight, but instead I would be testing it on several airguns as time went by. The Chaser test is today.

Mount the sight

The Chaser’s rear sight had to be removed to mount the UGT dot sight. There is a short rail in front of the pellet trough but I didn’t think it was quite long enough for this sight base. read more