Crosman 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle – Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This is Part 9 of an ongoing guest blog from reader HiveSeeker. He continues to research this subject that fascinates both him and many other readers.

This is about the air rifle he really enjoys. If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now, over to you, HiveSeeker.

Crosman 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle – Part 9

By HiveSeeker

2400KT
The 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle is only available directly from the Crosman Custom Shop. The cost of this custom gun, the HiveSeeker II with 14.6-inch Lothar Walther .22 barrel and shoulder stock, was $128, not including the scope and rings. The scope is a Leapers 3-12X44 AO SWAT Compact.

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The Crosman 180: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 180
My .22 caliber Crosman 180 is the second variation.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Plywood
  • The test
  • Crosman Premier
  • JSB Exact Jumbo
  • RWS Superdome
  • Summary

Today I’ll test the Crosman 180 for accuracy. I’ll shoot it at 10 meters, rested. I don’t expect great accuracy because this was always intended to be a plinking rifle, but it’s probably not too shabby, either. There is no easy way to mount a peep sight or a scope. This is a, “Stand on your hind legs and shoot like a man!” airgun.

Plywood

I mentioned in Part 1 that the stock is made from a plywood product. Chris USA had a difficult time seeing that, so I promised to show him in Part 2. Well, I forgot. So, before I start today’s test, I took a photo of the stock.

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The Crosman 180: Part 2

By Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 180
My .22 caliber Crosman 180 is the second variation.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Testing the gun as it sits
  • Warmup
  • Low power
  • Why just 5 shots?
  • High power
  • Power adjusted higher
  • Low power 2
  • High power 2
  • Power increased again
  • High power 3
  • Low power 3
  • Shot count
  • The cooling effect
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

This old Crosman 180 is like an air rifle I have never seen before. Even though I have owned it for about 30 years, I have never really shot it that much. I certainly haven’t tested it like I’m about to!

I was faced with both adjustable power and two power settings, which makes the test infinitely complex. So, instead of testing three different pellets, I only used .22 caliber Crosman Premiers. When you see how complex this test is, you will appreciate why I did that.

Testing the gun as it sits

Initially I shot the gun as it was  already adjusted. As I recalled, it shot Premiers at around 525 f.p.s. on high power in the past. I really didn’t know what low power was doing, so that was where I started. The CO2 cartridge that was in the gun from Part 1 was still pretty full, so I started with it.

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Determining the age of a vintage airgun

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • How old?
  • It starts with straight razors
  • Shape of the blade
  • Shape of the scales
  • Blade profile
  • Airguns
  • Generations/ages
  • Very old steel and wood
  • Seals
  • Spring guns
  • Funky parts
  • Other finishes
  • Post WW II steel and wood guns
  • Breech and piston seals
  • Look for plastic
  • Painted guns?
  • Summary

How old?

If you are new to the field of airguns there seems to be an ocean of things you need to know. If you want to become a collector, some of these things are crucial. Today I will explore how you can determine the relative age of a vintage airgun.

It starts with straight razors

Don’t worry, I’m not going to talk about straight razors very long. But they were the thing I used to rediscover what it feels like to be a new guy in an established hobby. Although I am not interested in collecting them, I couldn’t help but pick up some clues to their relative ages (when they were made) along the way.

Shape of the blade

Before around 1800, straight razors had no real tang. That’s the skinny part behind the blade where you hold the razor to shave. Razors from 1800 and earlier simply don’t have one. They just end the sharp blade and remain almost as wide but become dull as they go back to the pivot pin on the scales.

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The Crosman 180: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 180
My .22 caliber Crosman 180 is the second variation.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The acquisition
  • Quick fix
  • 180 variants
  • Trigger
  • The 180 valve
  • Adjustable power
  • Description
  • Sights
  • Summary

The acquisition

When my wife Edith and I lived in Maryland (1982-2003) we often attended the Columbia Flea Market. Once each month they held a Super Sunday when the market would expand by 500 percent. That was the day all the occasional dealers would attend, and bring the stuff nobody had ever seen. I found some tremendous air gun bargains there! Maybe I will write a report on just that — the deals I found and the deals I passed up. Today, however, I am starting a look at a Crosman 180 that came from that market.

We had been attending for more than a year and I believe I had started writing The Airgun Letter, or was about to. Because I was used to seeing vintage airguns at this market I carried several CO2 cartridges in my pocket, just in case. On this day one stall had this Crosman 180 and a .177-caliber 187 for sale. As I recall they wanted $40 apiece. I asked if they held CO2 and of course the dealer didn’t know. Then I asked if I could try my cartridges and she said yes.

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The Diana 27: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 27
My .22 caliber Diana 27 is actually a Hy Score 807.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Eye report
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Some questions arise
  • RWS Superpoints
  • The artillery hold
  • Summary
  • MP40
  • Second time was the trick

Before I begin, someone asked about Rich Shar. He’s the guy who smoothes the biggest spring guns like the big Gamos and Hatsans. Rich tells me he has not been working on guns for awhile, but he does have a project in the works. He promises to tell me more about it. Now, on to today’s report.

I have decided to take my Diana 27 apart and clean out the old grease, then relubricate it with Almagard 3752 grease, to see what difference it might make. But not today. Today will be a traditional Part 3 accuracy test.

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Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

MP40
Umarex Legends MP40 BB submachinegun.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Other interests
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Semiauto?
  • Umarex Steel BBs
  • Full auto
  • Back to Hornadys
  • How many BBs?
  • Shot count
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the new Umarex Legends MP40 BB Submachinegun. I’ve read reviews that say it is surprisingly accurate, so I was hopeful.

Other interests

Besides velocity, you readers had several other things you wanted me to try. I tried a few and will also report those results. Let’s go!

Hornady Black Diamond BBs

First up were Hornady Black Diamond BBs. I loaded just 10 into the magazine, because I wanted to shoot a 10-shot group. The MP40 stops shooting after the last BB is fired, so there is no risk of dry-firing and wasting CO2. The gun already had two mostly fresh cartridges in the mag from the end of the last test, so I went with those until they were exhausted.

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