Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

Umarex Fusion rifle
Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Today, we’ll test the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle at 25 yards. And today was also supposed to be the day I tested how long you have to wait to remove the CO2 cap after exhausting the gas. That’s not going to happn, though; because when I took off the CO2 cap to install 2 fresh CO2 cartridges, I noticed the o-ring was damaged pretty bad. So bad, in fact, that it might not work any longer. I switched it for a common black Buna o-ring of the same size and then charged the gun. At the end of this report, I’ll tell you how that works.

Umarex Fusion rifle damaged o-ring
The original o-ring had these two damaged spots. I thought it might leak, so I replaced it.

read more


Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Umarex Fusion rifle
Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Today is the first accuracy test of the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle. It comes one part late because we spent time looking at the CO2 cap, the adjustable trigger and the power adjuster in Part 3. The power adjuster is straightforward — twist the screw in and increase the striker spring tension to increase power. The trigger, we learned, is adjustable, but the safety slider prevents a very wide range of adjustability. You can modify it if you choose, but I don’t recommend it; and it will void any warranty on the gun. Blog reader mikeiniowa explained how it’s done, but he said to use caution — and I don’t intend doing it to the test gun.

read more


Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Umarex Fusion rifle

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Part 3 of most reports is the day we test accuracy. Sometimes, we test accuracy more than one time; but Part 3 is usually when we test it for the first time. But that isn’t going to happen today. Blog reader mikeiniowa told us that the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle rifle has both adjustable power and an adjustable trigger. I said I would look at that in detail when we got to it. Well, today’s the day.

The CO2 cap assembly
Before I get to either of those things, however, I want to talk about the CO2 cap in detail. I promised I would show you how this works, so I’m going to take it apart and show you the internals. I’ll also try to describe why the cap is as complex as it is.

read more


Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Umarex Fusion rifle

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle

Today, we test the Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle for velocity and several other things you readers are interested in. You may remember that in the first part I had a problem with the rifle not sealing when I loaded the CO2 cartridges. Blog reader mikeiniowa nailed the problem with the Fusion CO2 cap. The part that contains the piercing pin was partially unscrewed and was, therefore, longer than it should be. It was piercing the cartridges before the o-ring was in position to seal the gun. So, a lot of gas leaked out; and, because the o-ring absorbs CO2 and swells when it does, it also prevented the cap from being screwed down tight.

read more


Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

 

Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle
Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle.

One of the perks of visiting the manufacturer is getting to try new airguns. I visited Umarex USA last February to film my parts for this year’s American Airgunner show, and we were also given a tour of the facility in Fort Smith, Arkansas. We got to shoot many airguns and even a couple firearms, but the one gun that wasn’t quite ready was today’s subject gun, the .177-caliber Umarex Fusion CO2 rifle. Sales Director Justin Biddle (JB) told us the gun was going to be incredibly quiet. I really wanted to hear it perform, but it wasn’t going to happen because the gun just wasn’t ready.

read more


What is a bolt-action?

by Tom Gaylord, a.k.a. B.B. Pelletier

What is a repeater?

Today I’m writing about something that seems to confuse many people. It’s tied to how an airgun works, and I want to discuss it in detail for you. But first, let me tell you what motivated me to write today’s report.

The following is a real question I have heard many times.

I’m looking to buy a gun and it says the gun is a repeater. Please explain to me what a repeater is. Do I have to cock it for every shot? I don’t want it if I have to cock it for every shot. I want to just be able to pull the trigger and the gun fires.

I wrote the report that’s linked above for those new shooters who have trouble understanding the definition of a repeater. Some shooters don’t understand the difference between a semiautomatic action, where the trigger is pulled to fire the gun every time, and a repeater that must be both cocked and also load the pellet before it’s ready to shoot.

read more


Crosman’s 160: Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2


Fresh from the closet, another fine Crosman 160 emerges into daylight. We’ll watch this one blossom.

Today, I’m testing the Crosman 160 for accuracy. This is a target rifle — originally intended for 25-foot ranges, so 10 meters, which is very close to 33 feet, is the distance I shot for this test. And I shot at 10-meter rifle targets. It’s important to remember this rifle is a .22, not a .177, because the larger pellets will influence the overall group size.

The 160 has a post front sight that isn’t as precise as an aperture, but I learned to shoot on a similar sight, so it still works well for me. I’d disassembled the rear aperture sight during cleaning, so when I sighted-in there was a lot of adjusting to get the pellet on target.

read more