Sheridan Supergrade: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • JSB Exact
  • Crosman Premier
  • Sheridan Cylindricals
  • Predator Polymag
  • Crosman Premiers
  • H&N Baracuda
  • H&N Field Target Trophy
  • Evaluation so far
  • 10-shot group
  • Summary
  • 22 caliber club

Today I moved back to 25 yards to test the Sheridan Supergrade. There were also a couple extra tests readers asked me to do and they are included in this report.

The test

I shot with the rifle rested on a sandbag. I pumped the rifle 5 times for every shot in today’s report. I also wore my reading glasses to make the front sight as sharp as possible. The bullseye became a little fuzzier than usual, but I think you are going to see that it didn’t matter. read more


Sheridan Supergrade: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sheridan Cylindrical
  • JSB Exact
  • Adjusted the sight
  • Velocity
  • Crosman Premiers
  • H&N Field Target Trophy
  • Next

Today we test the accuracy of the Sheridan Supergrade at 10 meters. Let’s get started.

The test

I shot off a sandbag rest at 10 meters. The rifle was pumped 4 times for every shot. As you learned Friday, the trigger was set as light as it will go, which is 4 lbs. 10 oz.

I decided to shoot 5-shot groups and then to select the best pellet to shoot a 10-shot group. I went that way because a multi-pump takes so long to get ready for each shot. read more


Sheridan Supergrade: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Sheridan Supergrade right
My new Sheridan Supergrade is in fantastic condition, despite the wood check at the butt.

Sheridan Supergrade left
The cheekpiece makes the Supergrade stand out!

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Adjustable trigger!
  • Trigger-pull
  • Courage arrives!
  • Safety
  • Adjust the bolt handle position
  • Velocity
  • Test 1.
  • Test 2.
  • Test 3.
  • Pump effort
  • Summary

We’re back at it with the Sheridan Supergrade today. I will get to the velocity testing, but there are still a couple more surprises before that.

Adjustable trigger!

That’s right; the Sheridan Supergrade came with an adjustable trigger! Imagine that — an airgun from the 1940s with a trigger that adjusts.

The trigger adjusted in a unique way — by changing the location of the sear spring on a notched bar. To do this the rifle has to be out of the stock, which is not as straightforward as it is with some guns, so I won’t do it today. But I may work up the courage to try it at some point in our test. read more


Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Discussion
  • Summary

The last test of the Crosman 100 was back in December, when I shot a remarkable 5 pellets into 0.145-inches at 10 meters. That engendered the question of whether it was just a lucky group or the rifle was really that accurate. I said at the end of that report that I would return and shoot 10 five-shot groups at 10 meters with the same pellet, so we could see whether that target was a fluke or representative. I waited until my right eye was corrected again, to give the test the best chance for success. So, today is the day! read more


Crosman 102 multi-pump pneumatic repeater: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 102
Crosman’s 102 is a .22 caliber multi-pump repeater.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The rifle
  • Test 1
  • Rebuilt
  • Examine the power band
  • Trigger pull
  • Surprise!
  • Test 2
  • Magazine capacity
  • Feeding
  • Label
  • Summary

Today we look at the power of the Crosman 102 bolt-action repeater that we are testing. This test went in a different direction than I expected because of the rifle’s design. I will explain as I go.

The rifle

You know that I just finished the test of the Crosman 100, and I’m getting confused between that rifle and this one. I re-read Part 1 for this rifle to familiarize myself with its operation, and good thing that I did. I had forgotten one thing that turned out to have a huge influence on today’s test. But I’m getting ahead of myself. read more


Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

Part 1
Part 2

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Crosman Premier Lights
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy pellets
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Discussion
  • Summary

Today is accuracy day for the Crosman 100 multi pump and I had to get out the trime! If you have been reading the blog for more than half a year, you know what that means. If not, you will.

The test

The test was at 10 meters indoors with the rifle resting on a sandbag rest. I shot 5-shot groups today because the 100 is a multi pump. I pumped 4 times for every shot. I said in the last report I was going to pump 5 times per shot, but after examining the velocity figures I felt 4 pumps were enough. Because I only shot 5-shot groups, I tried 4 different pellets, and when you see the results you’ll be glad that I did! Five shots are a fair indicator of accuracy. They are not as conclusive as 10 shots, but in a pinch they will do. read more


Crosman 100 multi-pump pneumatic: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 100
Crosman’s 100 is a .177 caliber variation of the more plentiful model 101.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Texas Airgun Show
  • Model 100
  • Refinished and resealed
  • Description
  • Bolt action
  • Sights
  • Reference material
  • What’s next?

Today we begin looking at a variation of a multi-pump pneumatic rifle we have seen before. And when I say we’ve seen it, we have never seen this particular variation. What we have looked at its sibling, the .22-caliber Crosman 101. Both rifles got their start with the Crosman model of 1924, which was a .22-caliber multi-pump that came to market in — you guessed it — 1924!

The model 100 is simply the .177 caliber variation of the 101. It is scarce because during the time when it was manufactured, .177 was not a popular caliber in the United States. The larger .22 sold many times as many guns — probably for all the reasons you have discussed on this blog. read more