The Benjamin Cayden: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Cayden
Benjamin Cayden sidelever repeater.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • Accuracy
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Turned on the lights!
  • Air Arms 16-grain dome
  • H&N Baracuda Match with 5.53 mm heads
  • Air Arms 18-grain domes
  • JSB Exact Jumbo Heavy
  • Discussion
  • Personal note
  • Summary

Crosman managers — call your people together (except those assembling, of course). Tell them you have a winner in the Benjamin Cayden!  What an air rifle! I like the sidelever. I like the magazine. I like that it gets lots of shots on a 3,000 psi fill. I guess I just like the Cayden. Today I will tell everybody more about what I like.

Accuracy

Today is the second accuracy test and I’m moving back to 25 yards. I also boosted the power up as high as it will go, because the Cayden uses air so sparingly.

The test

I’m shooting off a sandbag rest from 25 yards. I decided not to adjust the scope today, as long as the shots land reasonably close to where I’m aiming. I shot 10 shot groups with each of 4 different pellets. read more


CCI .22 long rifle Quiet test

Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • CCI Quiet
  • CCI Quiet Semi-Auto
  • CCI Subsonic Hollowpoint
  • Discussion
  • Remington model 37 Rangemaster
  • Ruger 10/22 rifle
  • CCI Quiet accuracy
  • CCI Subsonic Hollowpoint accuracy
  • Quiet Semi-Auto accuracy
  • Summary

When I started reporting the sounds airguns make, using my new smart phone app that is a sound meter, readers asked me how the sounds of a PCP compare to a .22 long rifle cartridge. The Ataman AP16 pistol that is part of the Godfather’s Gold Gun Giveaway registered 108 decibels on the meter, but a CCI .22 CB Short — a .22 short round with very little powder — registered 112 dB. 

Reader Dave said he thought the CCI .22 long rifle Quiet was quieter than his PCP, and he sent me a box to try for you. He actually sent three different low-noise long rifle cartridges and today I will tell you how they all performed. read more


Tell BB gun: Part 4

by Tom GaylordZ
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BB gun
This military-looking BB gun is large and good-looking!

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • One more time
  • Comment 1 — clean the barrel
  • Comment 2 — try Marksman oversized BBs
  • Comment 3 — turn the shot tube to change where the balls impact
  • The test
  • Marksman BBs
  • 4.55 lead balls
  • Discussion/summary

One more time

I hadn’t planned to do a fourth report on the Tell BB gun, but several readers’ comments and questions changed my mind. This will be a short report.

Comment 1 — clean the barrel

Reader Feinwerk said this: “It sounds and looks to me like the barrel may be fouled. Look at the nasty dark rings around the target holes. And when you described having to ram 5 of the larger sized lead balls down, after which others rolled freely, it strongly suggested to me that you cleared some debris from the bore. Any way to pull some patches through this barrel?” read more


Tell BB gun: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BB gun
This military-looking BB gun is large and good-looking!

Part 1
Part 2

History of airguns

This report covers:

  • Lead balls only
  • The test
  • 4.4mm copper-plated lead balls
  • Trigger pull
  • 4.4mm Punktkugeln
  • H&N 4.45mm lead ball
  • What we know
  • The last step
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the Tell BB gun. I think this is going to be a very interesting report, so let’s get started.

Lead balls only

I waited to do this test because I was considering what to do about the inaccuracy of steel BBs. At two feet they were spreading out to three inches apart. That would mean that at 5 meters (16 feet) the spread would be several FEET. I thought about shooting them closer to the target but what’s the point? If they are that inaccurate I’m never going to shoot them anyway. So I decided to run this accuracy test at the standard 5-meter distance with larger lead balls. read more


The Benjamin Cayden: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Cayden
Benjamin Cayden sidelever repeater.

This report covers:

  • News from Benjamin
  • Craftsman Collection
  • Price
  • Description
  • Fill
  • Barrel not shrouded
  • Summary

News from Benjamin

I was contacted last week by the Crosman Corporation, They asked me if I would like to test one of the three new precharged pneumatic rifles from their Benjamin Craftsman Collection. You may recall that I showed you all three new rifles in Part 4 of my SHOT Show report, back in January. I asked to test the new Benjamin Cayden.

Cayden-1
The Cayden is a conventional-looking sidelever bolt-action PCP.

The Cayden looks conventional. The Akela is a bullpup repeater and the Kratos is a bottle-fed PCP. Both are repeaters like the Cayden and they all three come in .22-caliber. The Kratos bottle gun also comes in .25-caliber — the only one of the three that does. read more


The 788 project: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The Godfather’s Gold Gun giveaway
  • The rules
  • Design an airgun contest
  • The 788 project
  • Remington’s 788
  • First trip to the range
  • Free-floated barrel
  • Relieving the barrel channel
  • Ten-shot 50-yard group
  • Timney trigger
  • Glass-bedded action
  • So what?
  • Summary

The Godfather’s Gold Gun giveaway

Before we dive into today’s report I must tell you about a new feature on the Pyramyd Air website. It’s called Build Your Own Airgun. It’s an interactive set of pages that allows you to configure certain airguns the way you want them. Think of it as a custom shop where you are the builder. You put all the parts, features and finishes together for a certain airgun and then give your creation a name. Pyramyd Air will put your choices together and construct the airgun you have purchased. From that point on, every gun of that model with those same specifications will carry the name you have selected. read more


Tell BB gun: Part Two

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

BB gun
This military-looking BB gun is large and good-looking!

Part 1

History of airguns

This report covers:

Daisy Premium Grade BBs
4.4mm lead balls
4.4mm copper-plated lead balls
H&N 4.45mm
No more steel BBs
Trigger pull
Cocking effort
Summary

Today we test the velocity of the Tell BB gun. There was a lot of interest in this strange old BB gun in Part 1. Let’s get right to it.

Daisy Premium Grade BBs

First to be tested were Daisy Premium Grade BBs. They averaged  275 f.p.s., with a 21 f.p.s. spread from 266 to 287 f.p.s. However I noticed something very strange when testing them. Although my backstop was only 2 feet from the muzzle, BBs were hitting 3 inches apart. Several BBs went high and to the left after exiting the nuzzle. That led me to believe that smaller steel BBs might not be the right ammunition for this gun. Reader Brent suggested I try 4.4mm lead BBs. At 0.173-inches in diameter, as opposed to 0.171-0.172-inches for the Daisys, they should have fit better. read more