Posts Tagged ‘Crosman Premier pelletsr’

Benjamin Marauder pistol – Part 4

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3


With the 30mm Compact Centerpoint scope mounted, the Benjamin Marauder is set up for hunting small game.

This is the test I promised at the end of Part 3 of the .22-caliber Benjamin Marauder air pistol report back in December. You’ll remember that I didn’t think the scope I used for accuracy testing in Part 3 was doing all it could for the gun. I said I would try it again with the 30mm Centerpoint scope Crosman had sent with the gun, once I had a set of rings to mount it.

If you’re just learning about the Benjamin Marauder pistol for the first time with this report, you need to know that this pistol has taken the airgun world by storm. Just as the Benjamin Marauder rifle holds its own with European PCPs costing two to three times as much, the Marauder pistol does the same when compared to the high-priced PCPs coming from the same European companies. It’s a red-hot seller that offers unprecedented power and accuracy at an affordable price.

It has a choked Crosman barrel that stands equal to tubes from Ansch├╝tz and Lothar Walther. The reputation hasn’t been built yet, but the performance is undeniable. The trigger is very sweet and fully adjustable, and of course the pistol is shrouded. When fired, it sounds like a Daisy Red Ryder instead of the 15 foot-pound hunting airgun that it is.

I wasn’t satisfied that I’d seen all the accuracy the pistol had to offer in the last accuracy test, so this additional test was added to give us a second look. What I learned this time was remarkable and worthy of note, but I’ll get to that later.

For this test, I mounted Centerpoint’s 3-12×44 Power Class scope with mil-dot reticle and sidewheel AO in a set of two-piece Centerpoint 30mm high rings that Crosman provided. The high rings raised the scope up so high that I had to rest my chin on the comb of the detachable shoulder stock to see a clear image. If this were my pistol I would attach about an inch of firm foam padding to the top of the shoulder stock comb to bring my eye comfortably up to the right height.

This scope is sufficiently clear and bright enough that it enhanced the sight picture rather than detracting like the last scope did. Although the reticle lines are not thin, I was able to see the intersection of both the horizontal and vertical lines clearly inside the 10-ring of the bull, so aiming was more precise than it had been during the test in Part 3.

Which pellet to use?
Normally, when testing the accuracy of any airgun, I select four to six different pellets that I think will work, given the power and potential accuracy of the test gun. Then, we’ll see how they actually do on the range. Picking pellets for accuracy testing is fairly straightforward and based on the past performance of those pellets in similar guns. But not this time. I tried five different types of .22 caliber pellets, in addition to two other pellets that were used in Part 3 (Beeman Kodiaks were reused in this test because they did so well the first time around). However, nothing I tried wanted to group — except the Kodiaks. Kodiaks grouped so well that the pistol is an undeniable tackdriver. But, I’m getting ahead of myself.

Unfortunately, I didn’t pick Kodiaks from the start to sight-in the new scope, therefore I stumbled around with two other pellets for quite a while before realizing what was happening. They were RWS Superdomes and 15.9-grain JSB Exact domes. Both gave mediocre groups of about one inch at 25 yards in the test pistol, which made sighting-in very difficult. Then, I just gave up and defaulted to the Kodiaks that had done so well in the last accuracy test I delivered in Part 3. That’s when the gun started to perform.

In fact, the first “group” of Kodiaks was just for kicks to see where 8 pellets would land. Eight instead of 10, because that’s how many the magazine holds.


The first group of Kodiaks at 25 yards was this one. Eight pellets went into this 0.405-inch group. Though shot just for fun, it turned out to be the best group of the test.

After that, I shot group after group, and they were all similar. After several tight groups had built up my confidence in the gun, I was reminded of my old Hakim rifle that used to lob them into a similar round group at 10 meters. I would get so mesmerized by how accurate that rifle was that I couldn’t stop shooting. The sight of each new tight group when I went downrange to change targets was a turn-on. In the case of the Marauder pistol, I could watch through the scope as shot after shot went into the same ragged hole, only not at 10 meters but 25 yards. Thinking about my old Hakim also reminded me that the most accurate pellet in that rifle was the RWS Superpoint, which is now called the Superpoint Extra.

So, I got a tin of those and tried them in the pistol. Wrong! The groups opened up to almost one inch once more. So I wondered whether the heavy 18.1-grain JSB Exact Jumbos would perform more like the Kodiaks. After all, they are within a couple grains of the Kodiak’s weight and they are made by JSB. But I might as well have been shooting a shotgun, for all the good they did. No, this pistol wants to shoot Beeman Kodiaks, and nothing else!


I know this photo looks fishy, like I’m hiding a pellet hole under the coin, but I’m not. It’s just difficult to position a dime next to a target on a scanner. This group of eight Kodiaks measures 0.529 inches between centers. The top and bottom holes have closed, making the group appear smaller than it really is. This group is about the average size of all the Kodiak groups I fired.

Then, I had a thought. What about those new copperplated Kodiaks? Would they do just as well as the regular Kodiaks? If I didn’t try them, someone would bring it to my attention. I didn’t think the copperplated ones would perform the same as pure lead Kodiaks, but the only way to know for sure is to shoot them. I loaded a magazine and gave them a try. Much to my surprise, they did just as good as the all-lead Kodiaks.


Eight Kodiak copperplated pellets went into this group, which measures 0.458 inches c-t-c. Remarkable performance!

Summary
That’s my report on the Marauder pistol. Some will read it and grouse about the pistol not doing well with a wide range of pellets, but the black powder cartridge shooter in me says that as long as there’s one bullet or pellet that shines, the gun is alright. Once I find that one best pellet, I never mess with the others anyway. In the test pistol, Beeman Kodiak pellets are the clear winner. I would continue to try other pellets from time to time, but Kodiaks would remain my standard ammo until displaced by something even better.

The Benjamin Marauder pistol is every bit as stunning as the Marauder rifle, by reason of accuracy, power, trigger and quiet operation. As long as you use the shoulder stock that comes with the gun and as long as you mount a good-quality scope, this pistol is a real shooter. If you’re looking for a stealthy hunting air pistol, give this one serious consideration.

Benjamin Marauder pistol – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2


Benjamin’s new Marauder air pistol is a large, powerful precharged air pistol. It will be among the very few legitimate hunting air pistols.

Before we start, I’d like to wish a Merry Christmas to all our readers. I hope this holiday brings you all that you hoped for and more. And, let’s not forget the real present that was presented to all mankind on this day several thousand years ago.

This is Part 3, but there’s going to be a Part 4 coming. I’ll explain why in this report.

Mounted the scope
Crosman sent me a special one-piece cantilever scope mount and a CenterPoint Optics 4-12×44 compact scope with an adjustable objective (AO). There’s just one problem. The mount had one-inch rings and the scope has a 30mm tube. As I had only a brief time to run the test because of other pressing things, I replaced the scope with a Leapers 6x32AO compact scope with an illuminated reticle.

I cannot say for sure that the scope is a Leapers, for no brand name appears on it anywhere, but it certainly resembles one in all other aspects. The small scope size is perfect for a carbine, but the optics were not as sharp as I would have liked them to be. I want to go back with the same pellets and see how much better the pistol can do with the CenterPoint Crosman sent.


The 6x compact scope looks great on the Marauder pistol, but I don’t feel it gives enough precision to the aiming.

The test
The test was 10 shots from a rest at 25 yards. I swapped the two grip panels for the detachable buttstock to make shooting easier. And, I rested the gun across a shooting bag. After I got it sighted in, I started shooting for the record.

The first pellet I tried was the Beeman Kodiak. I was surprised by how loud the gun is when shooting this pellet. It’s like a Sheridan Blue Streak on 8 pumps of air, which is quite a bit louder than what I told you in part 2. The first magazine failed during this part of the test. It allowed me to shoot down to four pellets remaining, and then it stopped feeding. Fortunately, Crosman had sent a spare mag that got me back in the game in no time.

I wish you could have seen the gun shoot! It lobbed pellet after pellet through the same hole, enlarging it only slightly as the shot count grew. At the end, I was looking at a vertical group that measures 0.61 inches. I thought about that vertical stringing until the next group stretched horizontally. So, it wasn’t the pellet or the gun. It was me. I was unable to precisely place the scope’s fat reticle against the small target time after time.


They just kept going through the same hole. The hole got larger, but nothing landed outside it. Ten Beeman Kodiaks went into six-tenths of an inch at 25 yards.

The last time I watched a rifle shoot like this, I was shooting an Egyptian Hakim military trainer. At 10 meters, it made groups of about the same size. That built my confidence in the gun tremendously.

Satisfied that the pistol could shoot, I switched over to Predator pellets — the ones with the red polymer tip. One of our readers touted these to the skies, so I thought I’d check them out. On shot No. 1, there was a marked difference in the muzzle blast. It now sounded like a silenced airgun. So, I didn’t imagine anything in Part 2. This pistol really is quiet!

But better than that, the Predators are accurate pellets, too. Not quite as tight as the Kodiaks, but accurate enough to land 10 in a group measuring 0.745 inches. Like the Kodiaks, I got groups that were both vertical and horizontal, so we know it’s the aim point that needs refining.


Predators were accurate, too. This group of 10 measures 0.745 inches.

Crosman Premiers
The Marauder has a choked Crosman barrel, so it should perform well with Crosman Premier pellets. But, on this day, it wasn’t up to the standards of the other two pellets I tried. Again, I blame the lack of aiming precision, except in this case it really looks like the Premiers came in third out of the three pellets tried. They fit into just less than one inch at 0.961 inches.


Premiers opened up to just less than an inch. These 10 went into 0.961 inches.

The Premiers are on the loud side, as well. I think what the Marauder wants are pellets with thin, soft skirts. In the next accuracy test, I’ll try some new pellets, as well.

I think we have a clear winner in the Marauder pistol. This is one to write home about, but I think there’s more than we’ve discovered. That’s what I’ll put in Part 4.

Benjamin Marauder pistol – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1


Benjamin’s new Marauder air pistol is a large, powerful precharged air pistol. It will be among the very few legitimate hunting air pistols.

Man, there was strong interest in this new pistol when Part 1 was published. It’s riding the coattails of its rifle siblings, but I see that many people feel this smaller format will be just right for them.

First things first
I promised Kevin that I would try to run the drawing of the pistol’s trigger, so he could get some sense of how it works. So, we’ll do that right now.


I’m concentrating on the top image, though, I included all three. That is how the Marauder pistol trigger works.

I doubt that loading the 8-shot magazine could be any easier than it already is. A counter window faces the shooter, informing him which pellet’s on. But, when the last pellet is fired, the gun cannot be shot again until the mag is removed. The mag rotates to block the bolt from going forward so there’s no doubt that you’re out.


The counter window on the Marauder magazine tells at a glance where you are with respect to expended pellets. If you just cocked the pistol and loaded a pellet, the counter tells you it’s the last one.

When you insert the magazine back into the receiver on the right side, there will be a sharp click to tell you the mag has gone home. Then, simply cock the bolt which loads a pellet, and you’re ready to shoot.

Shooting the Marauder pistol
There’s noticeable recoil when the pistol fires. Not as sharp as a rimfire cartridge — it feels more like a rocket push. But the gun definitely moves.

The trigger breaks too cleanly to feel, in light of the recoil and noise of the discharge. And, speaking of the noise, the Marauder pistol makes less noise than a silenced Ruger Mark II shooting CB caps. That’s about equal to a Talon SS with a 24-inch barrel and an Airhog bloop tube. Read this report. You’llmake more noise clapping your hands.

I filled the gun to the recommended 2,900 psi and was surprised to note that the gauge on the gun and on the tank were in complete agreement. That doesn’t happen too often. I can’t guarantee you’ll have the same experience, but I liked it! Time to shoot.

Crosman Premiers
The first pellet I tried was the 14.3-grain Crosman Premier. The first string of 10 averaged 655 f.p.s., with a spread of 25 f.p.s. They ranged from 638 to 663 f.p.s. The average muzzle energy of 13.63 f.p.s. They dropped into the magazine with great ease and there were no feeding problems.

Because they were the first pellet and because they’re Crosman pellets, I continued to shoot until the power was on the way down. How many shots do you think I got? One magazine? Two? Before I started the test I guessed there would be as many as 20 good shots in the pistol from a single fill, but that was way off. I shot four full 8-shot magazines, plus one extra shot, for a total of 33 shots from the initial fill. Shot one registered 638 f.p.s. and shot 33 registered 639 f.p.s. The fastest pellet went 677 f.p.s., and there were three that went that fast. The average velocity for all 33 shots was 663 f.p.s. and the gun pressure had dropped just below 1,600 psi. In case you aren’t a precharged buff, that’s some impressive performance! And looking from that perspective, the gun generated 13.96 foot-pounds.

RWS Superdomes
Next, I tried RWS Superdomes. They weigh 14.5 grains in .22 caliber and averaged 665 f.p.s. in the test gun. The spread went from 649 to 671, which is a 22 foot-second spread. The average muzzle energy was 14.24 foot-pounds. From a pistol! Yes, they’re a little heavier, but they’re also made from a nearly pure lead alloy, so they’re self-lubricating. Also, they have a thinner skirt, which helps seal the bore behind the pellet.

Beeman Kodiaks
The last pellet I tried was the tried-and-true Beeman Kodiak. If you’ve got a .22 caliber PCP, you’ve got to try it with Kodiaks. It’s a heavy pellet, but it’s made of pure lead and therefore a little faster than if it were harder, because there’s not quite as much resistance when it goes down the bore.

But with Kodiaks, I noticed two additional things. The Marauder made half as much noise with Kodiaks as it did with either of the other two pellets. And, perhaps because it was quieter, it seemed to whack the target harder than either of the other two pellets. The quiet pellet trap actually moved when hit by Kodiaks.

Kodiaks averaged 584 f.p.s., with a 9 foot-second velocity spread from 578 to 587 f.p.s. The average muzzle energy came out to 16.01 foot-pounds. So, the Marauder pistol I’m testing is a 16 foot-pound gun. Pretty impressive for an air pistol, don’t you think?

I have to tell you that I’m lovin’ this pistol so far. If it turns out to be accurate, as well, I might have to buy it, rather than send it back.

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