Weihrauch’s HW55SF: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

HW 55SF
HW 55SF.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • H&N Finale Match Light
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Qiang Yuan Olympic
  • RWS R10
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Next
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the HW 55SF target rifle. I will tell you now that I was surprised by the performance. This is an air rifle that lives for years in my gun closet and only occasionally gets shot, so I forget how it works. It’s like a brand new airgun every time.

I have owned several HW55s over the years. One was the Custom Match that was their final release of the 55 series. It came out several years after the World Cup matches had switched to FWB 150/300s and Walther LGRs, so it never had a chance to dominate, but it was still quite a target rifle.

read more


Hatsan Bullmaster PCP: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan Bullmaster
Hatsan Bullmaster semiautomatic bullpup PCP.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Comments
  • New Bug Buster
  • Power
  • H&N Baracuda 5.50mm head
  • H&N Sniper Light 5.50mm head
  • H&N Field Target Trophy with 5.53mm head
  • Shot count
  • Trigger
  • Sound
  • Summary
  • Next

Comments

I’ll start today’s report by listing some of the comments you readers made to Part 1. Several of you don’t care for the Hatsan BullMaster’s looks. That’s why I show a picture of the gun at the top of each report. You have to be satisfied with the appearance if you’re going to buy an airgun this expensive.

Next, several of you commented on the weight. At more than 10 pounds before the scope is mounted, this is not a lightweight airgun. Bullpups are small, but not necessarily light.

Then there is the size, itself. For a bullpup, the Bullmaster is on the large side. The overall length of just under 31 inches is very short compared to a conventional air rifle, but for a bullpup it’s on the long side. That length does give you a fully shrouded barrel that’s just under 20 inches, and you need the barrel length for power, but the point of a bullpup is its compact size.

read more


Crosman’s Town and Country multi pump

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Town and Country
The Crosman Town and Country I tested was a model 108 in .22 caliber.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Town and Country
  • Was the Supergrade the influence?
  • Description
  • Front sight was a marvel!
  • Short pump lever
  • Velocity
  • Accuracy
  • Summary

When I was in the hospital for three months in 2010, my wife Edith kept this blog alive by publishing reprints of articles I had written for Airgun Revue magazine. One of those articles was the one I’m publishing today, with the difference being I am here now to edit my remarks and to lighten the black and white pictures.

Town and Country

A glance in the Blue Book of Airguns reveals that the Crosman Town and Country multi pump air rifle was made in 1949. That’s correct — ONE YEAR! Collectors debate whether it was also produced for a while in 1950, but the point is — this is one scarce airgun. And, look at that date again. What else was happening in the world of airguns, here in the U.S., in the late 1940s? Sheridan was making their model A, Supergrade!

read more


Codeuce spinner targets: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

This report covers:

  • How to test?
  • Targets set for powerful airguns
  • Diana 27
  • What the pellets did to the paddles
  • Leveling
  • Evaluation so far

Today will be a short report, but there is a lot in it. I’m testing the spinner airgun targets reader Codeuce made, and many of you readers were interested ion them in Part 1. Today I will show you how they work.

How to test?

Codeuce made two different sets of paddles for these targets. I showed them to you in Part 1. I said at that time that, based on how freely I saw the targets spinning, I didn’t think the lightweight set for lower-powered airguns was necessary. So I went my own direction for today’s test.

Targets set for powerful airguns

I tested the targets set up the way Codeuce sent them — with the heavier paddles installed. Let me show you how easy they work. ALLOW TIME FOR THE VIDEOS TO UPLOAD TO YOUR DEVICE!

read more


Crosman 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle – Part 9

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This is Part 9 of an ongoing guest blog from reader HiveSeeker. He continues to research this subject that fascinates both him and many other readers.

This is about the air rifle he really enjoys. If you’d like to write a guest post for this blog, please email me. Now, over to you, HiveSeeker.

Crosman 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle – Part 9

By HiveSeeker

2400KT
The 2400KT CO2 Air Rifle is only available directly from the Crosman Custom Shop. The cost of this custom gun, the HiveSeeker II with 14.6-inch Lothar Walther .22 barrel and shoulder stock, was $128, not including the scope and rings. The scope is a Leapers 3-12X44 AO SWAT Compact.

read more


The Crosman 180: Part 2

By Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Crosman 180
My .22 caliber Crosman 180 is the second variation.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Testing the gun as it sits
  • Warmup
  • Low power
  • Why just 5 shots?
  • High power
  • Power adjusted higher
  • Low power 2
  • High power 2
  • Power increased again
  • High power 3
  • Low power 3
  • Shot count
  • The cooling effect
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

This old Crosman 180 is like an air rifle I have never seen before. Even though I have owned it for about 30 years, I have never really shot it that much. I certainly haven’t tested it like I’m about to!

I was faced with both adjustable power and two power settings, which makes the test infinitely complex. So, instead of testing three different pellets, I only used .22 caliber Crosman Premiers. When you see how complex this test is, you will appreciate why I did that.

Testing the gun as it sits

Initially I shot the gun as it was  already adjusted. As I recalled, it shot Premiers at around 525 f.p.s. on high power in the past. I really didn’t know what low power was doing, so that was where I started. The CO2 cartridge that was in the gun from Part 1 was still pretty full, so I started with it.

read more


Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana Stormrider
Diana Stormrider precharged pneumatic air rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Wow!
  • Good enough for the price
  • Trigger
  • How loud?
  • Shots per fill
  • Crosman Premiers
  • How powerful?
  • The discharge?
  • Tremendous tuning potential!
  • The trigger
  • More power?
  • Powerful lesson
  • Summary

Wow!

Before I do today’s velocity test of this .22-caliber precharged rifle, I will begin by addressing all the issues, questions and concerns you have about the pedigree of the new Diana Stormrider. Right off the bat someone tells us the rifle is Chinese and made by Snow Peak. I knew that last time but decided to leave it out. Guys, it’s a global economy today and companies do that. Some don’t, and keep everything in house, but more and more often companies either source their parts from the outside, or they buy fabricated parts built to their specifications or they even buy entire products like the Stormrider, and put their names on them. It’s a fact of life.

read more