This one is for Bob

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • Savings
  • Greater accuracy
  • Back to money
  • Odd ammo
  • Back to Bob
  • A gift
  • Does he like it?
  • The benefit
  • How does this relate to airgunners?

I’m writing today’s report for my brother-in-law, Bob. Bob has owned firearms all his adult life, but a little over a year ago he decided to find out about reloading. Reloading means making your own centerfire ammunition — rifle ammo in Bob’s case.

Savings

People reload for several reasons. Perhaps the most popular one is saving money. That’s the one most shooters think of when they contemplate getting into reloading. And it does save money on a per-shot basis. Instead of spending 72 cents a round for commercial ammo or 41 cents for military ammo, you can put the same cartridge together for 18-35 cents. That’s a huge savings! But is it? Or does it just prompt you to shoot more? Do you end up spending the same amount of money and even more because you manufacture the ammo yourself? I think you do — not that that’s such a bad thing!

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Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 1

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 Model 20 is a vintage BB gun.

This report covers:

  • Preparation
  • Daisy BBs
  • Air Venturi BBs
  • Hornady Black Diamond BBs
  • Shooting to the left?
  • Accuracy
  • No joy
  • 4.4 mm lead balls
  • Conclusion

Today we will look at both the accuracy and power of the Daisy Model 12 Number 29 BB gun you all seemed to enjoy. Let’s get to it

Preparation

This vintage BB gun has a leather plunger (piston seal), so I made sure it was well oiled before I started the velocity test. I had soaked the plunger in oil for several weeks before this test.

Daisy BBs

First up were Daisy Premium Grade BBs. They averaged 307 f.p.s. through the chronograph. The low was 299 f.p.s and the high was 327 f.p.s., so the total spread was 28 f.p.s. That’s pretty fast for a conventional spring-powered BB gun by today’s standards. I wasn’t expecting much over 250 f.p.s..

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Beeman R1 supertune: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Beeman R1
Beeman R1 Supermagnum air rifle.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

This report covers:

  • Twitchy
  • The tune helped!
  • Important changes
  • Sight-in
  • No luck
  • One last group
  • Conclusions
  • New R1 book next year

Today will be interesting, because today we will see the Beeman R1 in a new light. At least I now do.

Twitchy

In Part 3 I told you that my R1 has always been a twitchy rifle to shoot accurately. Even when I wrote the R1 book, I had problems getting this rifle to shoot at any distance. Ten meters was easy, but beyond 20 yards the rifle just didn’t like to put them all together. But in every group of 10, 4 or 5 would be in a single hole — indicating the airgun wants to shoot. When I encounter an air rifle like that I call it twitchy, because it really needs the right hold to do its best. The problem is — I hadn’t found that hold for this rifle yet.

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Feinwerkbau Model 2 target pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB model 2 pistol
FWB model 2 target air pistol.

This report covers:

  • Affordable target pistol
  • The importance of a grip
  • A huge price gap
  • FWB Model 2
  • How I got this gun
  • Back to the gun
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Dry-fire device
  • Grips
  • Accuracy
  • More to come

Affordable target pistol

Today we begin a report on an air pistol — the FWB Model 2. It’s a 10-meter pistol that was made back in the 1980s. I’ll tell you all about it, but first I want to tell you that this series is not really just about this one pistol. It’s really a response to reader, Mitch, who asked me about any 10-meter target pistol I knew of for under a thousand dollars. Like many shooters, Mitch wants to try his hand at 10-meter shooting. He plans to purchase a Gamo Compact now, but in case he finds that he likes 10-meter he wanted to know if there was a better target pistol that he could afford.

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Daisy Number 12, Model 29 BB gun: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

Daisy model 29
Daisy Number 12 Model 29 is a vintage BB gun.

This report covers:

  • For Reb
  • The gun
  • Welded tube
  • Hard to cock
  • Sights
  • Single shot?
  • No chrome
  • Shot tube

This is about a BB gun you fondly remember, but never heard of.

HUH?

Today’s BB gun looks like many others from the turn of the century, especially the model H that lasted from 1913 until 1922. The No. 12 Model 29, however, is a single shot that was produced from 1929 until 1942, when Daisy put BB guns aside for the war effort. Although it is a later gun, it retains many characteristics of much earlier BB guns.

The most notable feature is the cocking lever that has a small finger loop, as opposed to the levers on most Daisys with full sized loops. The lever is cast iron, a vestige of guns made decades earlier. Because it lacks a forearm you can clearly see the sheet metal weld that seals the compression tube. This is where the soldered patch used to be — before Daisy figured out how to weld the thin metal tube airtight.

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Soon comes the BB gage?: Part 6

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

Pelletgage
The Pelletgage comes in .177 and .22 caliber at the present. A gage to measure BBs is coming.

This report covers:

  • Why sort BBs?
  • They must be uniform — right?
  • Measure with calipers
  • Odd one out
  • Out of round
  • The results
  • What does this mean?
  • The test
  • Out of round
  • 4.38 mm
  • 4.39 mm
  • So — sort them or not?

This report was unplanned. I was getting my Beeman R1 prepared for a return to the 25-yard accuracy test for today when a shocking development popped up. At least it was shocking to me. I’ll let you decide for yourselves.

Jerry Cupples, the Pelletgage maker, is working on a BB gage that will do the same thing as the Pelletgage, except BBs don’t have heads. The BB gage will measure the outer circumference of the BB, allowing shooters to sort BBs by size. Think about that for a moment.

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Where does B.B. get all those marvelous toys?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

The history of airguns

This report covers:

    • Airgun shows
    • Lesson 1. Attend airgun shows
    • Lesson 2. Get a Blue Book
    • Lesson 3. Read this blog — and use it!
    • Lesson 4. Recognize when opportunity knocks
    • That’s how it’s done

    A tip of the hat to the Joker, who asked today’s title question about Batman. Reader Kevin Wilmeth asked this last week, “Incidentally, I’d love to see an article some day on exactly how you do get access to the guns you do. Somehow I think I’d find that illuminating.”

    Kevin — today is the day! I hope you find my report as interesting as you thought it would be.

    Airgun shows

    When I started out writing about airguns in 1993 — the year before we launched The Airgun Letter — I attended the second airgun show held at Winston Salem, North Carolina. I was an unknown who was trying to promote a newsletter about airguns. The big questions were — who is Tom Gaylord and what does he know about airguns? But that’s for another report. Today we are discussing where I get my airguns.

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