Diana’s model 5 air pistol: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana model 5
This Diana model 5 air pistol is marked as a Winchester model 353.

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Iconic air pistol
  • History
  • Winchester
  • Gun Broker
  • The gun
  • Grip
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Expected performance

Iconic air pistol

Today we begin looking at one of the most iconic air pistols of all time — Diana’s model 5. In all my years as an airgunner, I have never owned a model 5! I’ve seen them, handled them and shot them, but have never owned one. I have owned 2 Diana model 10 target pistols that are related to the model 5, if not that similar. The model 10 has the Giss anti-recoil mechanism and is the target version of the model 6, while the model 5 is a conventional recoiling air pistol. Models 5 and 6 look a lot alike, except for the round caps on either side of the model 6’s spring tube that house the Giss anchors.

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Odds and ends

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Blue Book of Airguns
  • Some recent acquisitions
  • Findlay airgun show
  • Texas airgun show
  • Pyramyd Air Cup
  • Student Air Rifle (SAR) program

Today I thought I would clean up some things and tell you about some exciting things that have been happening.

Blue Book of Airguns

First I’ll tell you about the new Blue Book of Airguns. It’s the 12th edition and contains 736 pages. No, it doesn’t have all the airguns in the world, and it never will. No publication will ever be able to do that. But this is the most comprehensive book about airguns that exists, and if you want to play in the airgun world, you really need one.

Many of you ask me how I know so much about airguns. The Blue Book is one of the reasons. Without it I would not be the Godfather of Airguns. Perhaps the favorite cousin, but definitely not the Godfather.

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Am I alone…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • The questions
  • Some answers
  • The risk
  • The good news
  • Sheridan Blue Streak
  • The point

I received this comment to an older blog yesterday.

The questions

“Am I alone in wanting a Single-Stroke Pneumatic with more authority than a 10 meter or Canada-friendly option [power/velocity]? The gun I want the most would be:

1. A side lever or forearm lever single stroke pneumatic, to eliminate the need for the artillery hold and the kick of a springer and the barrel alignment issues of a break barrel.

2. Powerful enough to hunt small game humanely. Since the current 10 meter offerings seem to top out at under 5 ft./lbs. I would probably buy anything over 2/3 the muzzle energy and of comparable quality and price to the Diana 350 Magnum or Gamo Whisper Fusion 1300 springers I currently own.

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Diana 240 Classic:Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Which pellets?
  • The test
  • First 5 shots
  • Second 5 shots
  • Artillery hold wins
  • Tune in a Tube
  • 10 JSB RS pellets
  • 10 RWS Hobbys
  • 10 Crosman Premier lites
  • Pellet skirt damage
  • Evaluation thus far

I love my job! Today, the kid gets to play with a youth air rifle that’s easy to cock, has a nice trigger and, according to the velocity figures we saw in Part 2 of this report, plus the pedigree of the maker (Diana), should turn out to be very accurate. It’s as if I was employed by Santa Claus to test all the new airguns before he carts them off to their new owners all over the world. And, every two hours I get a break for hot chocolate! I love my job!

My job today is to begin to discover how accurate the Diana 240 Classic air rifle is. Like always, I will start at 10 meters and shoot with open sights.

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El Gamo 68-XP .22 caliber: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

El Gamo XP-68
The El Gamo XP-68.

Part 1

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Preparing to shoot
  • Petroleum oil or silicone?
  • Velocity determines which oil you need
  • Velocity
  • Deep-seating
  • JSB Exact RS
  • H&N Baracuda Match 5.51mm head
  • RWS Meisterkugeln
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Evaluation so far

I said I would return to this report after I repaired the plastic clamshell halves of the buttstock. That job is now finished. I was able to epoxy the pieces of the broken post that receives the stock screw together and, although it wasn’t completely straight, it was straight enough for me to drill a new pilot hole for the wood screw that holds the two halves together. The butt is now complete, so today I will test the velocity.

Preparing to shoot

In preparation to shoot I oiled the piston seal with a lot of silicone chamber oil and let the rifle stand on its butt for a day. If it has a leather piston seal, and I am almost certain it does, the oil will be absorbed and make the leather pliable again. That should give the highest velocity.

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Diana K98 pellet rifle: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana K98
Diana’s K98 Mauser pellet rifle is very realistic.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • First scope
  • First scope failed!
  • 10X fixed power UTG scope
  • The test
  • JSB RS
  • My eye
  • JSB Exact 15.89-grain
  • RWS Superdomes
  • Conclusion

I last tested the Diana Mauser K98 air rifle on December 20 of last year. On that day my right eye was so bad that I couldn’t even see the sights when wearing my glasses, so I had to shoot that test left-handed. Even so, I managed to shoot a 10-shot group that was almost one-inch at 25 yards. And I did it with the rifle rested directly on a sandbag!

First scope

Today I mounted an old Leapers 3-12 SWAT mil dot scope that happened to be attached to high rings that were sitting on a prototype Leapers drooper base. This base will fit the new Diana scope bases on the rifles. The scope was so old it was from the pre-UTG days. It just says Leapers on the tube.

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Diana 240 Classic:Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.

This report covers:

  • Classic airgun alert!
  • Diana model 27
  • Where has the 240 been?
  • A youth airgun
  • Finish
  • Sights
  • Trigger
  • Shooting impression
  • HW30 substitute?

Classic airgun alert!

What a timely test! I received the Diana 240 Classic when the Diana Mauser K98 rifle arrived, many weeks ago. Naturally I was drawn to the larger, more military-looking airgun first. But as it turns out, the Diana 240 Classic is also a classic that I think many of you are going to enjoy. I say that because I believe I am going to enjoy testing it for you.

Diana model 27

If you have read this blog very long, you know that I cannot help from referring to the Diana model 27 rifle as often as I can. That’s because of all the airguns I have ever shot, it is the one I like the best. To me it embodies the essence of the reason I am an airgunner. It’s lightweight, easy to cock, quiet, accurate and has an adjustable trigger that can be set very fine.

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