Paper Shooters Zombie Slayer Kit: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Paper Shooter Zombie Slayer
Paper Shooter Zombie Slayer.

This report covers:

  • I started out as a kid…
  • Time to cowboy up
  • Today’s report
  • 138 pieces
  • Plastic parts and steel screws
  • Special tips
  • Parts go in one way, only
  • It worked!
  • Last tip

When Val Gamerman, president of Pyramyd Air, asked me if I wanted to put a Paper Shooters Zombie Slayer Kit together and report on it, I jumped at the chance! I think that surprised him, but he didn’t know my history.

I started out as a kid…

I have been interested in how things work all my life. When I was given a watch for my 10th birthday and told it was waterproof, I promptly held it under the faucet. It wasn’t waterproof, by the way. When I was told that the way to carve an elephant from a block of wood was to remove everything that doesn’t look like an elephant, I set about with a jack knife to find the pachyderm. Looked in lots of wood blocks — no elephant yet. Lots of stuff that doesn’t look like one, though.

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Hatsan 85 MOBU Sniper Combo: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Hatsan 85
Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up rifle.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Hatsan has potential
  • Hatsan is conservative
  • RWS Superdomes
  • H&N Baracuda Match
  • Crosman SSP pellets
  • Trigger pull
  • Cocking effort
  • Scope base
  • Summary

Man, did I ever bump the beehive with this report! Part 1 certainly got a rise out of a lot of you. And you said what was on your mind. I bet you are the kind of guys who would tell me that my dog is ugly, too.

Okay, I’m rooting for the Hatsan 85 Mossy Oak Break Up rifle that I’m testing. Why? Because according to the advertised specs, it puts out a little more power than an RWS 34 (remember — we aren’t calling them Dianas any longer), yet sells in this combo package for 50 dollars less than just an RWS 34P, by itself. If this rifle is accurate, we have a potential world-beater on our hands.

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Haenel 310 bolt action trainer: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Haenel 310
Haenel 310 is a different kind of trainer.

A history of airguns

Part 1

This report covers:

  • How does the magazine work?
  • Velocity
  • Oiled the leather piston seal
  • Re-test velocity
  • Smart Shot lead BBs
  • Conclusions

Today we look at the velocity of the Haenel 310 trainer. I was asked by one reader whether the Smart Shot lead BBs will work in the gun, so we will also look at that.

How does the magazine work?

Another thing I was asked by a reader is how the magazine works. You saw a picture of the mag in Part 1, but the angle was wrong for understanding how the balls feed. Here are three pictures that tell the whole story.

Haenel 310 mag with follower down
Here the steel ball follower is held down by the magazine feed pawl (arrow). This spring-loaded pawl is pushed down out of the way by the bolt as it passes.

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The Gat’s where it’s at!: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gat
The Gat is a timeless classic air pistol. Shown uncocked here.

A history of airguns

Part 1

  • Hard cocking!
  • Air Arms Falcon pellets
  • RWS Hobby pellets
  • H&N Finale Match Pistol pellets
  • RWS R10 Pistol pellets
  • RWS HyperMAX pellets
  • Darts
  • Took longer to shoot
  • 2016 Texas airgun show

Today we look at the Gat’s power. I was also going to combine an accuracy test with today’s report, but I spent so much time just determining the velocity that I will only report that.

Hard cocking!

I reported in part 1 that the Gat is hard to cock. To cock the gun the barrel is pushed straight back, like a Quackenbush or a Crosman M1 Carbine. By the time I had tested 5 pellets and a series of darts, my left palm was sore!

hand
After about 31 shots, my hand was sore! I had to stop shooting.

Air Arms Falcon pellets

First up were Falcon pellets from Air Arms. These fit the breech rather loosely, though I didn’t know that until I had tried other pellets. They averaged 186 f.p.s. The spread went from a low of 165 f.p.s. to a high of 197 f.p.s. I had guessed that the Gat was a 200 f.p.s. pistol, so this was very close.

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Hammerli trainer: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

Part 1
Part 2

This report covers:

  • Seemed simple
  • The back door
  • Use penetrating oil
  • Pop the end cap loose
  • Gun comes apart
  • The piston
  • Constriction cleared!
  • What’s next?

Today is the day we tear into the Hammerli trainer for the K31 Swiss rifle. Before I took on this project I studied the trainer carefully for several days. I wanted to know if there were any surprises in store when I tried to disassemble the mechanism. The Swiss have a saying, “Never use one part when five will do.” That’s my way of suggesting that the Swiss engineering can sometimes be overly complex.

I had already determined by running a cleaning rod down the muzzle that there was an obstruction of over an inch in the barrel at the breech. Experience told me it would be several BB jammed together, with perhaps some other things that shouldn’t be there. It had to be pushed out.

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Hakim — Egypt’s pellet rifle trainer was better than the firearm: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • History
  • Air rifle
  • A lead sled
  • Sights
  • We’ll get dirty!

Today we start looking at the famous Egyptian Hakim underlever spring-piston air rifle trainer. It is a pellet rifle trainer for the 8mm Hakim battle rifle the Egyptians used for several years in the ’50 and into the ’60s. Some Egyptian law enforcement units are reportedly still using them today.

History

At the end of WW II Egypt found themselves awash in German 8mm rifle ammo left behind when the Afrika Corps left the continent. There was so much ammo that it prompted Egyptian military planners to create a new rifle to use it. Of course they could have just snatched up several hundred thousand Mauser K98s that were already chambered for the round, but they wanted something better — something of their own. Their recent exposure to the U.S. Garand gave them a taste for a semiautomatic rifle, but the U.S. wasn’t turning loose of any of them at the time. That would probably have made an ideal rifle to convert, as the American 30-06 and German 7.92X57mm (8mm Mauser) cartridges are quite similar.

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The Gat’s where it’s at!: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Gat
The Gat is a timeless classic air pistol. Shown uncocked here.

A history of airguns

      • Description
      • Loading
      • Cocking
      • Trigger
      • Ammo
      • A classic!

      My late wife, Edith, once told me that my writing style should be called discovery writing. She said I didn’t have to know everything I wrote about, because I could just discover it as I went and then share what I discovered with my readers. That’s good, because I sure don’t know a lot of the things I write about. Does that make any sense?

      Today’s report is on an airgun about which I know very little — the Gat. Over the years I have read things about Gats and one of them is that, while there may be many Gat-like airguns, the true Gat only comes from T. J. Harrington & Son, Walton, Surrey, England. They made them from 1937 through the late 1980s.

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