The Daisy 35: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Daisy 35
Daisy 35 multi-pump pneumatic.

Part 1

This report covers:

  • Velocity per pump stroke
  • More than 10 pumps?
  • Loading
  • Consistency
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • Sig Match Ballistic Alloy
  • Velocity with BBs
  • Daisy Premium BB
  • Marksman Premium grade BBs
  • Smart Shot
  • Pump effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Summary

Today we look at the velocity of the Daisy 35 multi-pump pneumatic. Let’s get started.

Velocity per pump stroke

First I tested the velocity per pump stroke with RWS Hobby pellets. Daisy says in the manual that 2 pumps are the least that should be used, so that’s where I started. Ten pumps are the maximum, and I was concerned to see if there would be any air left in the gun after firing after the maximum pumps. 

Pumps……Vel.
2…………….359
3…………….429
4…………….483
5…………….518
6…………….548
7…………….567
8…………….585
9…………….606
10..………….622 no air remaining after the shot

We see that the velocity increases with each pump stroke. The early strokes add the most velocity and things level off after 6 pumps. Velocity still increases, but the amount of the increase diminishes significantly.

More than 10 pumps?

I know that people always wonder what happens with additional pump strokes. I used to test that and here is what I have learned over the past 30 years. If you don’t exceed the recommended maximum number of pump strokes your airgun will remain fresh for a long time. Eventually the atmosphere does harden the seals and the velocity starts decreasing. This is when the gun starts to respond to more pump strokes than the recommended maximum. However, it will seldom exceed the maximum velocity of the same airgun with fresh seals. If it does, it will only be by a small amount. If you read the report I did on my Sheridan Blue Streak in 2016, especially Parts 2 and 3, you will see exactly what I’m talking about.

Pumping more times than the recommended maximum puts a strain on the bearings of the pump linkage. Any repair center can tell you that when they overhaul an older multi-pump, the linkage bearings are often shot. So I don’t do that anymore.

Loading

I tried loading the airgun with the reverse tweezers I told you about in Part 1. It did work, but not a hundred percent. While doing it I discovered the real loading problem with the gun and also how best to address it.

Daisy 35 loading tweezers
Loading the Daisy 35 with reverse tweezers was easy, but not necessary.

Several times the pellet I was loading fell backwards into the BB loading hole and that turned out to be the loading problem. It even happened when I used the tweezers. To load reliably I have to hold the rifle with the muzzle pointed down and roll the pellet into the loading trough with my thumb. It almost always falls into the breech when loaded that way.

Daisy 35 BB hole
That hole in the left side wall of the pellet loading trough is for BBs to be attracted to the magnet on the tip of the bolt. Unfortunately the hole is large enough for the skirt of the pellet to fall in and get jammed, so it won’t load when the bolt slides forward.

Consistency

Next I tested the 35 on 7 pump strokes with the same RWS Hobby pellet. This time ten shots averaged 576 f.p.s. The spread went from a low of 571 to a high of 579 f.p.s. That’s an 8 f.p.s. difference, which is reasonably tight and very typical of a multi-pump in good condition. Now let’s see how the gun does on different pellets.

Air Arms Falcons

I decide to test all other pellets on 7 pumps. The Air Arms Falcon dome averaged 554 f.p.s. The low was 542 and the high was 565, so the spread was 23 f.p.s. That is very large for a multi-pump. It suggests the Falcon may not be right for the Daisy 35.

Sig Match Ballistic Alloy

The last pellet I tested was the 5.25-grain Sig Match Ballistic Alloy wadcutter. On 7 pumps they averaged 624 f.p.s. The low was 621 and the high was 631, so a 10 f.p.s. spread that is not bad.

Thus far we have seen that the Daisy 35 is just as powerful as advertised on the Pyramyd Air website. Just for fun I pumped it 10 times and shot a Sig Match Ballistic pellet. It went out at 681 f.p.s. Is that close enough to the 690 f.p.s. printed on the box? You decide.

Velocity with BBs

Now let’s look at the velocity with BBs. I’ll test a conventional steel BB, a frangible BB, a lead BB and an oversized BB. All will be with 7 pumps. Let’s go!

Daisy Premium BB

First I tested 10 Daisy Premium Grade BBs. On 7 pumps they averaged 582 f.p.s. The low was 570 and the high was 605 f.p.s. That’s a spread of 35 f.p.s., which is not terrible considering how much smaller these BBs are than the bore of the 35.

Marksman Premium grade BBs

We know from testing that Marksman BBs measure 0.176-inches in diameter and are therefore too large to fit in many BB guns. But this gun is also for pellets and it fed and shot these BBs fine. They averaged 572 f.p.s., with a 47 f.p.s. spread from 549 to 596 f.p.s.

Smart Shot

Next tested were 10 Smart Shot lead BBs. Since they are not ferrous I didn’t try to feed them through the BB magazine but loaded them singly, like pellets. Smart Shot averaged 478 f.p.s. with a low of 453 and a high of 512 f.p.s. That’s a spread of 59 f.p.s.

Dust Devils

The last BB I tried was the Air Venturi Dust Devil. It’s lighter than the Daisy BB but also smaller in diameter, so I wondered what that would do to the velocity. Dust Devils averaged 570 f.p.s. with a 28 f.p.s. spread from 554 to 582 f.p.s.

Well, BBs weren’t as consistent in the Daisy 35, nor were they as powerful as lead pellets. I guess their one advantage beside low cost is that the steel ones feed through the magazine.

Pump effort

I said in Part 1 that the Daisy 35 seems easy to pump. But is it? 

Pump…Effort lbs.
1……………….5
2..…………….12
3..…………….12
4..…………….15
5..…………….20
6..…………….21
7..…………….19
8..…………….20
9..…………….19
10…………….21

What is happening, here? Why are more pumps taking less effort? I think the reason has to do with the speed of the pump stroke. Slow down and it gets easier, but you don’t seem to lose any velocity. So the Daisy 35 is definitely an airgun for younger folks.

Trigger pull

The single-stage trigger breaks with 5 lbs. 5 oz. pressure. That is about ideal for young people and new shooters. The break is reasonably crisp, so it’s very pleasant.

Summary

The Daisy 35 is stacking up quite well so far. And with my previous experience back in 2011, I believe it will also be accurate. We will see.

14 thoughts on “The Daisy 35: Part 2

  1. BB,

    This is turning out to be a very good air rifle to start a kid with. Small, light and easy to pump. That it is a multi pump helps to slow them down, giving them time to think of each shot and you to give further instruction.

    Trigger pull

    That is about idea (ideal) for young people and new shooters.


  2. BB,

    Nice test. Looking forward to the accuracy test.

    “Well, BBs weren’t as consistent in the Daisy 35, nor were they as powerful as lead pellets. I guess their one advantage beside low cost is that the steel ones feed through the magazine.”

    ….. feed through the magazine. ???? Did you mean something else?

    Chris


  3. BB-
    Re: Loading pellets. Gravity is indeed your friend when placing the pellet in the chamber. I would add that, rather than grasping the pellet by the waist, grasp the skirt from the rear. Also, your tweezers look like they have a pretty blunt tip. I would file them to a sharper profile. Hope this helps.

    I bought one of these ‘smooth rifles’ the same day as Part 1 of this blog. So far I am very pleased with it. I am using the Winchester (made in Spain) round nose pellets. They seem like they are made for each other. The gun is lightweight but has a solid feel. Pumping IS easy. And smooooth. There- another reason to call it a smooth rifle.

    I don’t believe I will scope it at this time. It is a smooth bore after all. I am able to see the sights well enough for the time being. Without a scope it is well balanced. To add weight to the buttstock, it appears I’d have to drill an access hole. No, I think I’ll leave it light and just concentrate on my hold. For $40, seems like a bargain.


  4. “To load reliably I have to hold the rifle with the muzzle pointed down and roll the pellet into the loading trough with my thumb.’
    B.B.,
    That is the same method I use with the Daisy 880, and it works pretty well for that gun, too.
    I’m hoping this model 35 has some good accuracy, at least out to 10 meters; as RidgeRunner noted, it’s shaping up to be a nice starter gun for kids. =>
    Take care & God bless,
    dave


  5. I have been comparing this to the Crosman 2100B, Legacy and Remington Air Master but for the price there is none.
    I have a Remington Air Master but really wanted to improve the power so I bought a Legacy with the improved air valve and pumping ability. It apparently has a weak point in that the receiver screws pull the threaded parts off the opposite half and it did in fact do that during the parts swap but now I have an Air Master with more power and I installed the longer rifled barrel into my HellBoy and can now shoot single pellets through it at a higher FPS and accuracy as well as BB’s
    I could probably install the shorter HellBoy barrel in the Legacy or make it a ‘Cork Popgun’ after repairing it but I think it will remain spare parts for the new and improved RAM.
    Bob M
    Went through the blog on the RAM (2005) and there are over 10 years of entries on it. Boy the names do come and go over the years.


Leave a Reply