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Seneca Dragonfly Mark 2 .177: Part Six

Dragonfly 177
Seneca Dragonfly .177.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5

This report covers:

  • Scoping
  • The test
  • Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads
  • JSB Exact 8.44-grain
  • JSB Exact Heavy
  • Sniper Magnum
  • Still easy pumping
  • Compared to the .22?
  • Summary

Today we look at the accuracy of the scoped .177-caliber Seneca Dragonfly Mark 2. It’s been a minute since we last looked at this rifle, so let me remind you of something. I did an extra accuracy test with the open sights and all it showed was which pellets were accurate and which were not. I’m shooting several of those same pellets today so we have a basis for comparison.

Scoping

I mounted a UTG Bug Buster 3-12X32 in the rifle. That’s the same scope I used on the .22-caliber Dragonfly Mark 2 for many accuracy tests. It took me 90 minutes to mount the scope because I had forgotten so many details about the rifle. It actually should have taken about 15 minutes. Then sight in took a little more time. But finally I was ready to test the rifle.

The test

I shot the Dragonfly Mark 2 from a sandbag rest at 10 meters. I shot 5-shot groups because this is a multi-pump and I wanted to finish the test today. Let’s get started and see what she does.

Baracuda Match with 4.50mm heads

First up were H&N Baracuda Match pellets with 4.50mm heads. I sighted in with them as well, so I felt they were the right pellet to start with.

Five Baracuda Match domes went into 0.427-inches at 10 meters. The group is well centered and just below the center of the bull to preserve my aim point.

In the last test with open sights the same pellet made two groups measuring 0.912-inches and 0.508-inches between centers. Today’s group isn’t enough smaller to say much about the accuracy of the rifle  scoped versus unscoped.

Dragomfly Baracuda Match
The scoped Dragonfly Mark 2 put five Baracuda Match pellets with 4.50mm heads into a 0.427-inch group at 10 meters.

JSB Exact 8.44-grain

Next to be tested were five JSB 8.44-grain domes. The Dragonfly put them into a 0.421-inch group at 10 meters. In Part 5 with open sights the Dragonfly put the same pellet into 0.71-inches. So the scoped rifle is a bit more accurate when shooting this pellet.

Dragonfly JSB 844
Five JSB Exact 8.44-grain pellets made a 0.421-inch group at 10 meters.ย 

This group is very vertical, and the group made in Part 5 is vertical as well. It’s reassuring to see things repeating like that.

Find a Hawke Scope

JSB Exact Heavy

The JSB Exact Heavy is a 10.34-grain dome. In today’s test five of them went into 0.223-inches at 10 meters. In the test with open sights the same pellet grouped five in 0.48 inches. This is a pellet to consider.

Dragonfly JSB Heavy
The scoped Dragonfly put five JSB Exact Heavy pellets into a 0.223-inch group at 10 meters.

I will say this. Shooting one small group proves nothing beyond I did it. But I am looking for pellets to try at 25 yards in upcoming accuracy tests and I want to select the ones most likely to be accurate.

Sniper Magnum

The last pellet I tested today was the H&N Sniper Magnum. It grouped five into 0.503-inches between centers with four in 0.223-inches. In Part five with open sights I put five into 0.322-inches at 10 meters. This is a second pellet to shoot at 25 yards.

Dragonfly Sniper Magnum
The Dragonfly Mark 2 put five Sniper Magnums into 0.503 inches at 10 meters.

The one hole that’s not with the rest was shot number 4. There was no called pull; the pellet just went there.

Still easy pumping

The Dragonfly is still very easy to pump. That makes it quite convenient for a scope because you don’t have to hold it where the scope sits. You can hold it by the pistol grip and it still feels fine.

Compared to the .22?

This .177 has not yet equaled the accuracy of the .22-caliber Dragonfly, but I’m not giving up. The next test will be at 25 yards, now that the rifle is scoped. 

Summary

The Seneca Dragonfly Mark 2 is a revolutionary new multi-pump pneumatic that is revolutionizing the world of pumpers. It’s a landmark to what persistence can do when a good idea is on the table.

65 thoughts on “Seneca Dragonfly Mark 2 .177: Part Six”

  1. “The Seneca Dragonfly Mark 2 is a revolutionary new multi-pump pneumatic that is revolutionizing the world of pumpers.”
    B.B.,
    I concur with that 100%, and I thank “The Great Enabler,” who influenced me to buy mine. ๐Ÿ˜‰
    Take care & God bless,
    dave

    • Siraniko,
      The strength of the magnetic holder was not sufficient for me, and I would often find the single-shot tray out of place when I went to load the rifle; hence, I glued it in place, as I never used the magazine. Yet for those who wish to use it, even with regular medium-height mounts, there was just over an eighth inch of space (about 4 mm) between the top of the magazine and the bottom of my one-inch scope tube. It’s a little hard to see (with my fat hand in the way =>), but in the second pic, I am holding the magazine with the bottom of it aligned with the insertion slot. ๐Ÿ™‚
      Wishing God’s blessings on you,
      dave

      • thedavemyster,

        Thanks for the picture! Although I do agree that the single shot tray is more in line with a multi pump rifle it makes sense to have a magazine when in dimly lit places and manipulating a small .177 caliper pellet into the breech.

        Siraniko

        • “… it makes sense to have a magazine when in dimly lit places and manipulating a small .177 caliper pellet into the breech.”
          Siraniko,
          Yes, Sir, I concur with that, and that’s why I’ve kept the magazine in case I want to switch it out.
          Mine is the .22 caliber version; but some days, even those are hard to load, as in, my hands are not as steady as they were back in my 20s. ๐Ÿ˜‰
          Blessings to you,
          dave

  2. Kinda feel bad for people who get these Dragonfly airgun rifles because the stock has apparently been made just for me and I believe they even grew a special tree for me, so the wood grain follows every curve. Especially on the comb.
    Perhaps they did it for everybody? Everything is just right.
    Once you get it in your hand you just don’t want to put it down again. What a pleasure to shoot.

    Haven’t had the time to get serious with it. I need a scope mounted (Eyes). And this “Global warming” is killing me. Expecting winds up to 50mph and snow below 3000ft here in San Diego County. After a month of cold on and off rain, mud and wind.

    • Bob M,

      On this side of the country we have not had a winter. My crocus and daffodils are blooming already. My tulips and iris are sprouting and I expect will be blooming soon. I was going to prune my apple and dogwood trees, but with this warm weather they are already sprouting. With a winter like this, I could almost be convinced that “global warming” is real.

      With work, rain and wind, I have not had much time to get any shooting in though. Maybe it will calm down some this weekend.

      P.S. Get that new Bug Buster. They are awesome!

      • RidgeRunner, my friend,

        I know you to be an intelligent and thoughtful man. Your flowers and sprouting apple trees and dogwood are speaking to you. They are saying, “Climate Change is real.”

        If things do not slow down climate change-wise, your grandchildren will suffer, and your great-great grandchildren will see extinction on the horizon. I know you would not want that.

        Michael

        • Michael, many years ago, I had a poetry page, a list of pages; and I set up pages for budding poets. Most were young people (high school kids; they had the most time on their hands =>). They also sent me pics of themselves doing “small cutting” (I didn’t even know what that was at the time, 1999), and telling me about the things about which they were worried. I told my wife, “These kids need help! These kids need hope.” I shut down the poetry page, and started a blog (The Ever Encouraging Word) to lift their spirits; below is the entry for Christmas 2010.
          Blessings to you, man! ๐Ÿ™‚
          dave

          25 December 2010

          Subject: one eighth of a second

          well my dear ones,

          I watched a movie with my wife called “2012”
          about the end of days
          supposedly predicted by the Mayan calendar.

          Now I do like a good disaster movie as much as the next person,
          especially if it has excellent special effects
          (as this one does).
          Mostly I like to see how the characters will react,
          and who is willing to sacrifice what for whom.

          However, I have some friends who are actually worried about 2012.

          As for me, the whole Mayan end of days thing
          falls in the category of stuff about which
          I wouldn’t spend even one eighth of a second
          worrying about it.

          Actually, as far as I’m concerned,
          there’s a ton of stuff
          that falls in that category:
          nuclear disasters,
          global warming,
          hurricanes and tornados,
          economic disasters,
          a meteor striking the earth,
          or basically any disaster scenario…
          …none of those things
          are worth as much as an eighth of a second
          of my worrying about them.

          Years ago, my philosophy professor
          quoted Plato as saying that
          as long as people wish to live on planets,
          God will provide planets for them to live on.

          Flip the roles on the wishing
          and I’ll buy it. *lol* =)

          I know where I came from
          and where I’m going,
          so why worry about any disaster?

          Donโ€™t get me wrong;
          I think we have a duty
          to be good stewards of the earth
          (just as we have a duty
          to be good stewards of all things
          which are entrusted into our care).
          However, if you spend much of your time worrying
          about possible end-of-the-world scenarios
          you wonโ€™t have much time
          to be of effect in the lives of people you love,
          the people who care about you.

          Personally, I’d rather spend my time
          trying to help my loved ones
          and trust in God for everything else.
          Actually, I trust in God
          for helping my loved ones, too,
          since much of the help they need
          is totally beyond my control.

          May you find rest from your cares.
          May you have eyes to see all the miracles
          constantly going on all around you.
          May the grace of God shine into your life.
          And whatever you personally may believe,
          may you have a Merry Christmas,
          for when the Author of Creation
          stepped onto the stage to become one of us
          that was done for you.

          And God would have done that for you alone,
          so how can you ever think you are not important?

          You are loved by the One who spoke
          and the universe leapt into existence
          and that is no small thing.

          Have a great week!

          grace, peace, and love to you,

          dave

          “I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly.”

          — Jesus

          • thedavemyster, Michael, and everybody, I too have come across the terms “global warming” and the more modern “climate change”. I am one of those who does not believe in either! ๐Ÿ™‚

          • thedavemyster,

            Thank you Dave!
            As you know there are far too many UnBelievers in our time; they are Lucifers playthings. They are hard at play and moreso with every facet of the human condition with every passing day.
            Thank you for being a Believer.

            shootski

          • Dave,

            Wanna get religious? Take this:

            Thessalonians-1 4:13: But I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning them which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, even as others which have no hope.

            Leviticus 5:17: “If a person sins and does what is forbidden in any of the LORD’s commands, even though he does not know it, he is guilty and will be held responsible.”

            Genesis 2:15 The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to work it and keep it.

            Matthew 25:29 (The Parable of Talents) For to everyone who has more will be given, and he will have in abundance. But from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away.

            Psalm 24:1-2 A Psalm of David. The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein, for he has founded it upon the seas and established it upon the rivers.

            Revelation 11:18 โ€œThe nations raged, but your wrath came, and the time for the dead to be judged, and for rewarding your servants, the prophets and saints, and those who fear your name, both small and great, and for destroying the destroyers of the earth.โ€

            From K. Huffty, Christians are called to be good stewards of the earth, Nov. 13, 2018:

            “Scripture is permeated with examples of God commanding us to tend to his creation. Itโ€™s one of the first things God asked of us in Genesis 2:15, after the creation of mankind. Likewise, there are examples in Jeremiah 2:7 and Deuteronomy 11:12 of how God looks over his creation.”

            Feigning ignorance and imbracing ignorance is no defense against sin in the eyes of God. Read your parables.

            Michael

            • Michael,

              The Old Testament is certainly instructive as you pointed out above; but the teachings of Jesus Christ put pay to all of the punishment by bearing it all on the CROSS for us poor sinners who believe in the redemption he gives freely for the Believer.

              It is indeed a hugh step for some to take the leap of Faith in him!

              My Lord and The Savior Jesus Christ,
              Amen

              shootski

              • Shootski, I just crawled out of bed to go to the bathroom and my curiosity got the better of me for a moment. My eye (the less bad one) dropped on this comment of yours. โ€œThe Old Testament is certainly instructive as you pointed out above; but the teachings of Jesus Christ . . .โ€

                Shootski, last I checked Matthew 25:29 (The Parable of Talents), which I quote, is New Testament. :^)

                Back to bed to hug my pillow and wimper.
                Michael

                • Michael,
                  ..
                  Crawl back into bed if you need and continue you recuperation.
                  I don’t know if you are, or arent, a Kool Kat…but you know what they say about curiosity and the feline type!
                  I will say you did list some New Testament material. I was a student in an Old School Catechism Class run by our senior Pharrer (Pastor) who noted at the end of the second year and just before our public (entire congregation) verbal examination to remember that the teachings of Jesus Christ were to be considered paramount in our lives and during the Confirmation Examination.

                  shootski

            • Michael,
              Peace, brother, peace.
              I was only sharing a point-of-view.
              I concur we are to be good stewards of the earth,
              as well as of all things placed in our paths.
              Please see my post for tomorrow; thank you.

            • Michael,
              I made a Word document of your comment so that I can re-read it, pray over it, contemplate it, and meditate upon it.
              You are living out 2 Timothy 3:16-17,
              “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness:
              That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.”
              And I thank you for that.
              Peace and blessings to you,
              dave

        • Michael,

          And what are the canale in Venedig (Venice) Veneto: https://apnews.com/article/travel-allergies-italy-business-climate-and-environment-61a72d4a39067b38f6cb867e7535dbdf
          And the CLIMATE CRISIS (new terminology) you got to keep up: https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2023/02/22/us/margarita-tequila-agave-climate-crisis/index.html

          I depend on Meteorologists who specialize in Climate not “Climate Scientists” who could NOT pass the Math and Physics classes to get a degree.
          Lol!
          shootski

    • Bob,

      Try thinking โ€œClimate Changeโ€ rather than โ€œglobal warmingโ€ if it will help you understand what 97 percent of the worldโ€™s climate scientists say is happening to Earth (nasa.gov). You are experiencing weather, not climate.

      According to the United Statesโ€™ Geological Survey, โ€œWeather refers to short term atmospheric conditions while climate is the weather of a specific region averaged over a long period of time.โ€
      According to oceanservice.noaa.gov, โ€œWeather is what you see outside on any particular day. So, for example, it may be 75ยฐ degrees and sunny or it could be 20ยฐ degrees with heavy snow. That’s the weather. Climate is the average of that weather.โ€

      Have you lived in San Diego long? How hot have the last few summers been compared to 15, 20 years ago? How about just 10 years?

      Michael

      • You have striven to led folks to the real issues. Weather is friable, but climactic and atmospheric trends are long range. The things one should take heed are things like the increasing levels of CO2 in the oceans and the warming of them as they are the great heat sinks of the planet. The dying off of ocean reefs should give real concern.

        The planet will survive even if the species homo sapiens does not. We need to give our full attention to the carbon loading of the atmosphere that the biosphere took aeons to clear by photosynthesis. Plants and geological processes buried huge amounts of carbon in the earth and seas to provide a viable atmosphere. That we humans cavalierly release that stored and removed carbon BACK into the atmosphere is as concerning as it is stupid.

        We are on the cusp of what one can hope will be a new energy paradigm. My old professor, Dr. W. Fredrick Cottrell, Ph.D., wrote a landmark book in the late 50’s called, “Energy & Society.” The book points out that all energy sources and their converters arise, reach a climax and are replaced by the next energy source. We have seen the Age of Coal wither in our time (the ages don’t end abruptly, according to Dr. Cottrell, but taper off as the next age arises), and the Age of Petroleum is showing the signs of decline (even as usage increases).

        The scientist/engineer who developed the LiPoly battery is working on the Glass Battery that has four times the storage of current batteries, is fire resistant, and can be made with common elements as well as having a 60th of the recharge time. It appears that it can do 25K charge cycles. IF, and that is the word, “if,” that becomes a viable reality, it will likely spell the doom of the I/C engine in most vehicles. What other kinds of things can move from combustion to wind, solar, hydro and nuke energy harvesting?

        Imagine being a young, brilliant engineer student with boundless energy and capacity in chemistry, electricity, mechanical engineering with a flare for manufacturing? That person will be the Henry Ford of the next major change in culture. Remember, even the most die-hard livery stable owner eventually probably owned a loud, stinky fliver….

    • BOB: I’m just north of you at 2100 feet elevation in Aguanga. Up here in the High Desert, we’re supposed to get up to 3 inches of snow! Is that the fluffy wet stuff? I don’t think I even own any long pants, much less warm jacket! How am going to go shooting this week? I truly love shooting my Dragonfly MK2 . . . I just don’t think shooting in the snow is going to cut it. After all, I haven’t used any water-proof wax on the stock. Orv.

  3. Right now, I have too many other gals clamoring for some range time to have another move in. I just recently had an AirForce Texan LSS, an AirForce Talon SS, a Beeman 800 and just the other day a Diana 34 move into RidgeRunner’s Home For Wayward Airguns. As far as pumpers go, there is a Crosman 101 that still needs some attention. Just for giggles, I have a couple of CO2 pistols to fix for the kids.

    I am going to have to retire so I have time to dance with all of these ladies.

    • Sounds like a plan which should be implemented.

      Fear I am seeing symptoms of AADD – Airgun Attention-Deficit Disorder; so much enablement and choices out there…oh wait! I see a squirrel! And an iguana! And have you checked out the Diana XR200?

  4. B. B.
    I wouldn’t think of it as curious, just as I don’t believe so much in coincidence…
    I would first believe that it’s a matter of power changing. Reasons? Others, maybe you, could tell me. By the way I don’t think that a heavy pellet that performs well with five pumps at 10m will work equally well at longer ranges. It will need some more power (pumps).
    Just a thought (logic and experience are assisting here, but who knows?).

      • BB

        …That would be tuning the airgun to the pellet. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Thinking about how fine I make the adjustments while tuning a PCP, going from 5 pumps to 6 would represent a 20% change – which would be a pretty coarse adjustment.

        Still, by playing with the power and the pellet weight you could get close to an optimum balance.

        That would be a fun exercise with my Benjamin 392. Will add that to the project list for next summer.

        • Vana2,

          Hank do you think you could get it to 2 MOA at 10…what about 2 MOA at 25?
          I’m really looking forward to what B.B. can get out of the DragonFLYER Mk2 at 25!
          Willing to do a friendly wager?
          Will it be near 2 MOA, 3 MOA, 4 MOA or more?
          We should have a Contest!

          shootski

          • shootski,

            Other than checking/adjusting the sights I haven’t shot paper with the 392.

            I think of it as a casual plinker for offhand use and it does minute-of-a-pop-can easily. I suspect that its 1 inch MER would be 25 yards – iron sights, benched, unsorted and, maybe 35 yards scoped, benched and sorted.

            Spoke with my “pusher” this AM and the package is in motion, it’s looking like 2-3 weeks for hands on. ๐Ÿ™‚

            Hank

  5. The 10m accuracy is more than good enough for plinking. Yes, a tad bit behind the 22 cal version that was tested earlier, but does that mean every 177 and 22 cal unit of this rifle will exactly present the same results here? Still, the 177 has been performing wonderfully in the report.

    My only complaint would be the fiber optic front sight. Seneca should consider making a muzzle cap piece with squared black blade front sight avaliable for this rifle as accessory. It might sell like hot cakes and make profit worth the effort. Any plans for a cheaper synthetic stock version?

  6. Hello All,

    My wife and I are about to leave for one of my monthly opthamology appointments in my attempt to delay the darkness that gets a little worse for me everyday. Therefore, I have no time to fuss with you now. However, tomorrow, if I feel well enough after today’s treatment, and if I will be able to focus on my screen, I will be back with a lengthy lesson in climate science for you.

    Michael

    • Wow Michael, every month you travel to an ophthalmologist who makes you feel unwell? ๐Ÿ™

      Anyway, I’m interested to read your personal thoughts about, well, anything really, even what science discoveries you have made about the climate. ๐Ÿ™‚

  7. May the darkness be delayed for the rest of your life. Putting you on the prayer list which includes my good visually-challenged friend who nevertheless yet keeps fighting the darkness – and is still achieving fist-sized groups with his Ruger 10/22 and 9mm Kimber pistol at 10-12 yards. Granted, he must rely on visual aids such as scopes and laser sights but he keeps at it. Keep up the fight!

    • FawltyManual,

      I hope that for Michael and anyone else with eye problems too!
      Fortunately there are amazing medical interventions on the near horizon of Opthalmology that may finally banish most of these blinding conditions to the dustbin of history.

      shootski

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