S&W 78G and 79G – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Today, we’ll look at velocity and power of the S&W 78G. I’m getting reacquainted with this pistol because I’d completely forgotten how it performs. For starters, I’d sent this gun to Dave Gunter in Oregon to reseal and soup it up. Dave and I decided that I wanted the maximum power I could get from the gun, so that’s what he gave me.

Dave also told me I’d get only a few shots from a CO2 cartridge at this power level. I accepted that because I seldom shoot CO2 guns, anyway, so gas conservation isn’t high on my list, but in this case performance was.

In Part 1, I neglected to tell you about the pistol’s other modifications. At some time in the past, the former owner had the trigger turned into an adjustable one. Though it’s only a single-stage regardless of where the trigger is set, the let-off can be adjusted down into the dangerous range. It was set that way when I bought it through the internet, and I asked Dave to adjust it to a safe level as long as he was working on the gun. read more


S&W 78G and 79G – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Nobody asked for this report, but after completing the report on the Crosman Mark I and starting the report on the Crosman 2240, I thought I’d complete the circle by reporting on this pistol, as well. Why this one, you ask? Because, back in the day, the 78G was a competitor of the Mark I in both power and accuracy.

I reported on the 78G as recently as last year, but that report was thin. Now, with both the Mark I and the 2240 getting a full three-part test, I feel I have to include this gun as well, to round out the field.


This is my S&W 78G in the box. Many of these guns have their original boxes because they were sold as new old-stock just 10 years ago. read more


The Crosman Mark I and Mark II – Part 3

by B.B. Pelletier

TheSeptember podcast went live yesterday. If you enjoy hunting, you’ll like this podcast! My voice still sounds a little weak, but I think that I also didn’t set up something properly in Garage Band, which is how I record the podcast. Now, on to today’s blog.

Part 1
Part 2

Today, we’ll look at accuracy. Several years ago, I wrote a feature article for Shotgun News in which I pitted the Mark I and a Smith & Wesson 78G against a modern Crosman 2240. I thought the vintage guns would run away with the contest when it came to accuracy, but the reverse happened. The 2240 beat both other guns for power and accuracy. So, tomorrow I’m starting a special three-part test of the 2240, just to keep the playing field level. Today, it’s the Mark I’s turn in the spotlight. read more


The Crosman Mark I and Mark II – Part 2

by B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Crosman’s Mark I Target is a beautiful single-shot air pistol. It resembles the Ruger Mark I.

Well, today I’ll test the velocity of my Crosman Mark I pistol. And you’ll recall that I’d planned to adjust the gun’s power for you as well. Well, I discovered that the pistol was already set as high as the adjustment will go, so that’s where I’ll start this report.

This buggered-up screw sticks out the front of the receiver, just beneath the barrel. Turn it out to slow the pellets and in to speed them up.

The gun has two power levels that are determined during cocking. The first click of the twin cocking knob selects low power and the second click is for high. On low power, the trigger is single-stage, and on high power it’s two-stage. It didn’t have as much creep on low power as I remembered, but there’s definitely a little bit. read more


The Crosman Mark I and Mark II – Part 1

by B.B. Pelletier

Crosman’s Mark I Target is a beautiful single-shot air pistol. It resembles the Ruger Mark I.

Ruger’s Mark I was a pistol worthy to be copied.

I am writing this report at the request of a reader, but also because I feel it’s worth telling the full story. I did a very brief report about it back in 2005, when I hadn’t yet developed my formula for airgun tests. As a result, that report is very thin and leaves a lot out. I also wrote another brief report about the LD modification that Mac 1 does to this platform; but, once again, that wasn’t too detailed.

For those readers who are new and might wonder where they can up look this sort of stuff, I use the excellent Blue Book of Airguns, eighth edition as a guide. If you want to be in the know regarding airguns past and present, you need a reference library, and this excellent resource should be the cornerstone. read more