Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 3

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1
Part 2

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • Big day!
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • Group 1
  • Group 2
  • Group 3
  • Group 4
  • Group 5
  • Strain of the test
  • Group 6
  • This is it!
  • Evaluation so far
  • Tuneup next!

Big day!

Today is the big day! Today I test Geo791’s .22-caliber Diana RWS 34P air rifle to discover how accurate it is. I have been thinking about this test for a long time and have come to the conclusion that there is just one thing I want to know — how accurate is this rifle and is it consistent? That sounds like two things, but it’s really two parts of the same thing. Is this air rifle accurate enough to kill pests?

We have had many conversations on this blog about the level of accuracy needed for that purpose, but I said I wanted to see the rifle put 10 shots into a group that’s under an inch at 25 yards, when open sights are used. I don’t need to see that accuracy with many different pellets, either. If I were to go that route, this test could turn out to be a lifetime affair! I’ll let Geo791 do that, as the owner should.

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Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 2

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Part 1

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • The breech
  • Velocity JSB Exact RS
  • RWS Superdome
  • RWS Hobby
  • Firing behavior
  • Cocking effort
  • Trigger pull
  • Next
  • Next
  • Evaluation

Today we are back with reader Geo791’s Diana 34P, and we’re looking at the velocity. This is a .22, and a fresh one should produce velocities and power in the same neighborhood as the Beeman R1, but not quite as powerful. George was never concerned about the power of his rifle — only the accuracy that he thought was sporadic. But I do plan to tune his rifle with a Vortek kit that was donated by Vortek for this series, so either way, he wins.

Power has little affect on accuracy. Sometimes if a shot cycle can be smoothed a lot you may see tighter groups, and other times if a weak powerplant is restored to new or better the airgun might shoot better. But typically I tell people that accuracy lies in the barrel and not in the tune. However, just because I say it doesn’t make it so. We shall see.

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How to make a spring-piston air rifle shoot smooth: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Benjamin Legacy SE
The Benjamin Legacy SE.

This report covers:

  • Strange report
  • The beginning
  • Over and out
  • Throttle brought it back
  • Lower velocity
  • Summary

Strange report

Today’s report is a bit strange. It could be considered one about an historic airgun, because the gun I will talk about is no longer made. I decided instead to put it into the modern section, for reasons I hope will become apparent.

It also could be considered as an open letter to airgun manufacturers, because it deals with an air rifle many shooters potentially want, though most of them don’t know it until they actually shoot the gun.

Finally, it could be considered as a chastisement of some airgunners who think that more power is the only path to happiness with an airgun. Why don’t I just tell the story and let you readers decide?

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Diana 240 Classic: Part 5

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 240 Classic
Diana 240 Classic.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

This report covers:

  • The scope
  • The test
  • Sight-in
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • RWS Superpoints
  • Summary

Today we examine the accuracy of the Diana 240 Classic at 25 yards when scoped. I think this will be interesting.

The scope

I mounted a nondescript Gamo 3-9X40 scope for two reasons. First, it was already in rings that would fit the rifle and second, it is the type of scope many shooters would mount on a rifle like the 240. This is the kind of scope that comes bundled in a combo, so I can’t give you a link, but we are talking about a $40 scope at the most. There is no parallax adjustment, so at 9 power the target was a little fuzzy, though I used a target with a one-inch red center that made centering the crosshairs easy.

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How do you know…?

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

This report covers:

  • August’s question
  • Experience
  • How do you tell…
  • Expected power
  • Piston stroke
  • Age of the gun
  • Chronograph or other means of power determination
  • How do you know? — case 1
  • Case 2
  • Last point
  • The last word

Today’s topic tries to address a question I am sure many newer airgunners have at some point. How do you know when a spring gun need repair? It was asked last week by reader August, who lives in Germany. Here is what he asked.

August’s question

”How do I recognize that an older gun piston seal is going bad? From reading the blog I gather that I can chrony it. But this gun delivered until right before the final breakdown. Only the last five shots it became slower. On opening the gun I saw that the outer part of the plastic seal was detached from the rest and had blocked the spring tube probably causing the older spring to break.

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Checking out a Diana RWS 34P: Part 1

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

Diana 34P
The Diana RWS 34P is a classic breakbarrel spring-piston air rifle.

This report covers:

  • George’s rifle
  • Are Diana 34s ever not accurate?
  • Examining George’s rifle
  • It it a scope problem?
  • Use open sights
  • Condition of the test rifle
  • What I plan doing
  • What if it’s not accurate?
  • What does accurate mean?

Today we start looking at the Diana RWS 34P rifle that reader Geo791 has had trouble with. If I understand his problem, the rifle will not group for him. I think he said the best he could do at 25 yards was 10-shots in a group measuring 1.5 inches between centers of the two widest shots. George, if that’s not accurate, please enlighten us, because we want to know exactly what we are testing here.

George’s rifle

George’s rifle is a .22. He bought it for pest elimination. As I recall, the garden was the primary area of concern and chipmunks were the principal target in the beginning, but squirrels are now on the list too. He bought a .22 because he read that is was better for taking game, which I would absolutely agree with. Not that a Diana 34P in .177 can’t do the job, but in .22 it’s a lot more positive. That’s assuming you can hit what you shoot at, which brings us to the problem I am evaluating.

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FWB 124 air rifle: Part 4

by Tom Gaylord
Writing as B.B. Pelletier

FWB 124
This FWB 124 Deluxe is not the exact gun I’m writing about, but it is the same model.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

A history of airguns

This report covers:

  • Sight-in
  • The test
  • Crosman Premier lites
  • RWS Hobbys
  • Trigger
  • JSB Exact RS
  • Air Arms Falcons
  • What’s next?

Today I back up to 25 yards and shoot the FWB 1`24 for accuracy again. I will still be using the open sights.

Sight-in

The nice thing about open sights is they are usually in the right general place. Except for guns like the BSA Meteor Mark 1 I recently tested, most guns with open sights will be on paper at 25 yards. Since this 124 was coming off a 10-meter session, I knew it had to be close.

The first shot hit high but in line with the center of the bull, so I slid the elevation slider back. Shot two landed very low, so I advanced the slider halfway and shot three was in the bull. After that I didn’t touch the sights again.

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